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Worldwide Week at Harvard 2018

20-27 October, 2018

Worldwide Week at Harvard showcases the remarkable breadth of Harvard’s global engagement. During Worldwide Week, Harvard Schools, research centers, departments, and student organizations host academic and cultural events with global or international themes.

Thanks to all who hosted, attended and participated this year!

International Festival at Worldwide Week at Harvard 2017 | Photo by J. Graham Pearsall
Worldwide Week at Harvard logo
The Future of Cities panel discussion from Worldwide Week at Harvard 2017 | Photo by Rose Lincoln / Harvard staff photographer

Worldwide Week Events

Saturday 20th

Oct
20
Sat
Exhibit

The Rockefeller Beetles Exhibit | Opening Day

9:00AM
Harvard Museum of Natural History, 26 Oxford Street Cambridge, MA

Over the span of 90 years, banker and philanthropist David Rockefeller collected beetles from around the world, eventually building a personal collection of more than 150,000 specimens. In 2017, his longstanding support for the entomology department of the Harvard University Museum of Comparative Zoology culminated in a gift to the museum of this extraordinary collection. Learn more from the Harvard Museum of Natural History. 

Exhibit on view beginning Saturday, October 20, 2018. Museum is open to the public, admission rates apply: Free admission for HUID cardholders (+1 guest),  MA residents every Sunday morning 9AM-Noon and Wednesdays 3PM-5PM, Massachusetts K-12 teachers, MA residents who present Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) cards. General Admission: Adults $15, Non-Harvard students w/ ID: $10, Senior Citizens $13, Children ages 3-18: $10, Children under 3 years: free. 

Hosted by the Harvard Museum of Natural History. 

 

Oct
20
Sat
Exhibit

Gallery Discussion of Cecilia Vicuña: Disappeared Quipu

11:00AM to 12:00PM
Museum of Fine Arts, 465 Huntington Avenue Boston, MA 02115

On view in the Linde Family Wing for Contemporary Art at the MFA Boston, the exhibition includes a newly commissioned sculpture and video installation by Chilean-born, New York-based artist Cecilia Vicuña, in dialogue with five ancient quipus on loan from the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard University, and weavings from the MFA’s world renowned Andean textile collection. Vicuña has devoted much of her decades-long artistic practice to studying and interpreting quipu, an ancient form of record keeping through knot making. Her new work transforms these mysterious objects from an ancient mode of communication into an immersive, room-sized installation, using monumental strands of knotted wool and participatory performances that involve fiber, poetry, and song.

Presenters: 

Cecilia Vicuña, artist;
Liz Munsell, Lorraine and Alan Bressler Curator of Contemporary Art;
Dennis Carr, Carolyn and Peter Lynch Curator of American Decorative Arts and Sculpture;
David Guss, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Anthropology at Tufts University;
Tom Cummins, Dumbarton Oaks Professor of the History of Pre-Columbian and Colonial Art in the Department of the History of Art and Architecture at Harvard University;
Gary Urton, Dumbarton Oaks Professor of Pre-Columbian Studies in the Department of Anthropology at Harvard University. 

Hosted by the the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies.

Museum admission policies apply: free admission for HUID cardholders (students, faculty and staff) and discounted passes for guests through the Outings and Innings office. 

Oct
20
Sat
Other

"The Blonds (Los Rubios)" | The Cinema of Albertina Carri

7:00PM to 9:30PM
Harvard Film Archive, 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Directed by Albertina Carri.
With Albertina Carri, Santiago Giralt, Jesica Suarez.
Argentina/US 2003, 35mm, color & b/w, 89 min. Spanish with English subtitles.
 

Carri achieved a radical breakthrough with Los Rubios, her edgy and still-controversial shape-shifting meditation on memory, truth and the untold history of the desaparacidos... Learn more at Harvard Film Archives. 

Hosted by the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies and the Harvard Film Archive. Tickets required, admission rates apply: $9 regular admission, $7 non-Harvard students, HUID faculty & staff and senior citizens, free for Harvard students with valid HUID. 

 

Sunday 21st

Oct
21
Sun
Performance

"Fog x Macbeth" Performance with Actors' Shakespeare Project

5:00PM to 7:00PM
Hunnewell Building Lawn, Arnold Arboretum, 125 Arborway Boston, MA 02130

Witches, murder, intrigue--all will be revealed in the fog...or will it?

Fog x Macbeth brings Shakespeare's tragedy of political ambition, blood, and flawed humans into the landscape of the Arnold Arboretum, and the art and shifting atmosphere of Fujiko Nakaya's fog sculpture. The play's live and site-specific performance will resonate with Frederick Law Olmsted's landscape design and Fog x FLO, Nakaya's fog installation throughout Boston's Emerald Necklace park system. Actors' Shakespeare Project explores robust language, resonate stories, and the deeply human characters in Shakespeare's plays through productions, that like Macbeth in the Fog, are informed by the spaces in which they happen.

All seating is free and on the lawn. Bring a blanket, a low chair, a picnic. Dress accordingly for the weather. No registration required. 
Raindate, Monday, October 22 at 5:00pm.

Co-sponsored by Harvard University Committee on the Arts (HUCA) and the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University.  

Oct
21
Sun
Performance, Other

"Cuatreros" | The Cinema of Albertina Carri

7:00PM to 9:30PM
Harvard Film Archive Cinematheque, Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts, 24 Quincy Street Cambridge, MA

Directed by Albertina Carri.
Argentina 2016, DCP, color, 83 min.
Spanish with English subtitles
 

An unexpected follow-up to Los Rubios, Carri’s unclassifiable latest documentary began as a film portrait of the legendary Isidro Velázquez (1928-1967), a notorious agitator and popular hero celebrated as the “last of the gauchos.” Velázquez was also, however, the subject of an important book written by Carri’s father and finished before his assassination by the dictatorship. And so Cuatreros (an Argentine term for horse rustler) gave way to another personal and charged odyssey by Carri, whose own voiceover narration guides its willfully meandering path towards a broader meditation on violence and Argentina’s dark history, with Carri dispassionately explaining, digressing and often speaking in angry and ironic counterpoint to the images on screen. Cuatreros’ first finished form was a multichannel installation whose traces are vivid in the scenes of Carri juxtaposing one, two and up to five different images drawn from archival footage.

“What do I seek? I search for films, also for family, a family that is alive, and one that is dead; I seek a revolution, its dead, some kind of justice; I search for my mother and fathers, desaparacidos, their remains, their names, what they left me. I make a Western of my own life. I seek a voice, my own voice, through the noise and rage of those shattered by that same bourgeois justice.” – Albertina Carri

Hosted by the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies and the Harvard Film Archive. Tickets required, admission rates apply: $9 regular admission, $7 non-Harvard students, HUID faculty & staff and senior citizens, free for Harvard students with valid HUID. 

Monday 22nd

Oct
22
Mon
Lecture/Panel, Information Session/Networking

RCC Harvard WorldWide Week Open House

11:00AM to 12:30PM
RCC at Harvard Conference Room, 26 Trowbridge Street, Cambridge MA

This Open House is addressed to Harvard Community members and International Visitors who have an interest in the programs run by RCC to generate cooperation between Harvard and the Spanish Knowledge System; that provide resources for Spanish students that come to Harvard and Harvard students interested in going to Spain; as well as those interested in other possibilities such as collaboration for finding resources for European Union-focused projects.

During this open day, the RCC Director, staff and fellows will be available to welcome all faculty and students at Harvard University who may be interested in programs at Spanish universities to explain in detail all the queries regarding studying and carrying out research in Spain as well as other opportunities for exchange. RCC, as a Harvard affiliated center, actively encourages the support to the Worldwide Week at Harvard. During the week, RCC will host academic and cultural events with Spain as the common subject. This will be a great opportunity to get to know RCC programs, initiatives and study groups. For the past 28 years, RCC has received up to 5,000 Alumni and visitors, endorsing around 1,000 research projects, and programs through 500 fellowships for faculty and graduate students. It has hosted hundreds of courses, featuring professors from Harvard, and other prestigious universities worldwide. It has also organized more than 2,500 activities in cooperation with the various Schools at Harvard University.

Oct
22
Mon
Lecture/Panel

SHARIAsource Lunch Talk :: Book Talk on From Slaves to Prisoners of War: The Ottoman Empire, Russia, and International Law

12:00PM to 1:00PM
Austin Hall room 102, Harvard Law School. 1515 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA

Will Smiley will discuss the research underlying his new book (Oxford University Press, 2018), in which he charts the changing law and practice of captivity and slavery in the Ottoman Empire and Middle East, at the intersection of Islamic and international law. The Ottoman-Russian wars of the eighteenth century reshaped the map of Eurasia and the Middle East, but they also birthed a novel concept—the prisoner of war. In the eighteenth century, the Ottoman state and its Russian rival, through conflict and diplomacy, worked out a new system of regional international law – replacing systems of ransom and enslavement with new rules that delineated sovereignty, redefined individuals' relationships to states, and prioritized political identity over economic value. In the process, the Ottomans marked out a parallel, non-Western path toward elements of modern international law—not as a product of European imposition or imitation, but with maintained commitments to Islamic law. For a time even European empires played by these rules before the codified global law of war in the late nineteenth century. This story offers new perspectives on the histories of the Ottoman and Russian Empires, of slavery, and of international law. 

See full event description. RSVP to shariasource@law.harvard.edu.

Speakers:
Will Smiley, Assistant Professor of Humanities, Department of Classics, Humanities and Italian Studies, University of New Hampshire.

Moderator:
Intisar Rabb, Professor of Law, Harvard Law School; Director, Islamic Legal Studies Program (HLS); Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Professor, Harvard University Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study; Professor of History, Harvard University Faculty of Arts and Sciences.


Respondents:
Cemal Kafadar, Vehbi Koç Professor of Turkish Studies, Harvard University Faculty of Arts and Sciences. 
Mariam Sheibani, Visiting Fellow, Islamic Legal Studies Program: SHARIAsource, Harvard Law School. 

Hosted by the Islamic Legal Studies Program, Harvard Law School. 

Oct
22
Mon
Lecture/Panel, Other

The Informal Politics of Gender: Russia, Iceland and Twenty-first Century Male Dominance

12:00PM to 1:15PM
CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street, Room S354

This book argues that the primary political obstacle holding women back in the twenty-first century is a bait and switch promising but simultaneously undercutting gender equality. Through a comparison of Russia and Iceland, the book shows how this revised form of male dominance came about, how it constrains feminisms, and how activists are beginning to fight back.

Presenter: 
Janet Johnson, Professor of Political Science at Brooklyn College, City University of New York, USA, and Visiting Scholar, Center for European and Mediterranean Studies, New York University. Her books include Gender Violence in Russia (2009) and Living Gender after Communism (2006).

Hosted by the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies as part of the Gender, Socialism and Postsocialism Working Group. 
This event is free and open to all. 

Oct
22
Mon
Lecture/Panel

There Are No Dead Here: A Story of Murder and Denial in Colombia (Book Talk)

12:00PM to 1:00PM
Wasserstein Hall, Room 3007

Join the Human Rights Program (HRP) for a book talk with the writer, activist, and lawyer, Maria McFarland Sanchez-Moreno. As the executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance, Maria is at the helm of the leading U.S. organization fighting to end the war on drugs domestically and beyond. Her new book is a narrative non-fiction account of the rise of paramilitaries in Colombia in the late 1990s. With close ties to the cocaine business, the paramilitaries carried out a violent expansion campaign committing atrocities against thousands of people. The story is told through the perspective of three characters—a fearless activist, a dogged journalist, and relentless investigators—whose lives intersect in the midst of this drug-fueled cycle of terror. This talk will be moderated by Emily Nagisa Keehn, Associate Director of the Academic Program at HRP.

This talk is co-sponsored by the Criminal Justice Policy Program, the Harvard Human Rights Journal, and the HLS Advocates for Human Rights. Copies of There Are No Dead Here will be sold at the event. Lunch will be served.

Oct
22
Mon
Lecture/Panel

Using economic research to drive policy improvement: Learning outcomes in Pakistan's education system

12:00PM to 1:15PM
Rubenstein Building, Room 414 AB, Harvard Kennedy School, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Around the world, more and more children—especially girls—are going to school. But what are they learning once they get there? Unfortunately, in many countries, the answer is not much. How can we use economic methods to solve this and other development challenges? Asim Khwaja, Co-Director of Evidence for Policy Design (EPoD) at Harvard Kennedy School, will discuss how research on Pakistan’s educational ecosystem is identifying solutions in public and low-cost private schools—and how a data-driven, diagnostic approach can improve policy more broadly. EPoD staff and fellows will then lead a discussion about career paths in economic development research. Lunch will be served. 

Presenters: 
Asim I. Khwaja, Sumitomo-FASID Professor of International Finance and Development, Harvard Kennedy School and Co-Director, Evidence for Policy Design

This event is free and open to the public.

Hosted by Evidence for Policy Design, Harvard Kennedy School. 

 

Oct
22
Mon
Other

Solving Complex Problems in International Development: A DIY Guide

12:30PM to 1:30PM
Virtual (live link in description)

The Building State Capability (BSC) team at the Center for International Development will officially release the PDIAkit: A DIY Guide to Solving Complex Problems in International Development. BSC has developed a step-by-step approach called Problem Driven Iterative Adaptation (PDIA), which helps you diagnose your problem by breaking it down to its root causes, identify entry points, search for solutions, take action, reflect upon what you have learned, adapt and then act again. It is a dynamic process with tight feedback loops that allow you to build your own solution to your problem that fits your local context.

Presented by Matt Andrews, Edward S. Mason Senior Lecturer, Harvard Kennedy School and Salimah Samji, Director, Building State Capability.

Hosted by Building State Capacity, Center for International Development.

This event will be live-streamed. Watch the live release Oct 22nd, 12:30pm: https://www.facebook.com/HarvardCID

 

Oct
22
Mon
Lecture/Panel

Environmental Health Capacity Building in Latin America

1:00PM to 2:30PM
Harvard Chan School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Ave, Building 1, Room 1302, Boston, MA 02115

The largest health effects of environmental contamination are being experienced in developing countries. Harvard is partnering with institutions in Latin America to build local capacity to understand these local environmental exposures, quantify their health effects and develop effective prevention strategies. This panel will describe several ongoing environmental health capacity building projects in Mexico and Brazil including
• Assessing the health benefits of air pollution control policies in Mexico City over the past 25 years
• Strengthening community innovation and sustainability support systems in Mexico
• Harvard Chan – University of Sao Paulo collaborative laboratory exchange program

Presenters:

Douglas Dockery, John L. Loeb and Frances Lehman Loeb Research Professor of Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Rick Rogers, Principal Research Scientist, Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Ramon Sanchez, Director, Sustainable Technologies and Health Program, Center for Climate, Health and the Global Environment (C-CHANGE), Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

This event is free and open to the public.

Oct
22
Mon
Lecture/Panel

East Asian Spirit Writing: Tradition, Theory, and 21st Century Practice

3:00PM to 5:00PM
Conference Room, Center for the Study of World Religions, HDS, 42 Francis Ave., Cambridge

Anne Crosby, MTS '18, will lead a discussion on the symbolic origins of Chinese spirit writing and its continuing role in contemporary East and Southeast Asian religious practices. This discussion will be an overview of mediumship, varieties of spirit writing, and its use in divination. It will touch upon the relevance of the practice in the legitimization of new religions and religious institutions, its relationship to state authority, and significance to religious economies.

Hosted by the Center for the Study of World Religions at the Harvard Divinity School. 
This event is free and open to all. 

Oct
22
Mon
Seminar

How Do Political Dynasties Affect Economic Development? Theory and Evidence from India

3:00PM to 4:15PM
Harvard Hall 104, Harvard Yard Cambridge, MA

Speaker:
Siddharth George, PhD Candidate, Department of Economics, Harvard University.

Chairs:
Michael Kremer, Faculty Associate. Gates Professor of Developing Societies, Department of Economics, Harvard University.
Jie Bai, Assistant Professor of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School.
Anders Jensen, Assistant Professor of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School.
Melissa Dell, Faculty Associate. Assistant Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, Harvard University.
Asim Khwaja, Faculty Associate. Sumitomo-Foundation for Advanced Studies on International Development Professor of International Finance and Development, Harvard Kennedy School.
Gautam Rao, Faculty Associate. Assistant Professor of Economics, Harvard University.

This event is held by the Seminar in Development Economics, sponsored by the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs and co-sponsored by the Department of Economics, Harvard University, and the Department of Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Oct
22
Mon
Lecture/Panel, Information Session/Networking, Reception

Destination: World

4:00PM to 6:00PM
Belfer Case Study Room, CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street Cambridge, MA

Kicking off Worldwide Week at Harvard 2018, student tales from beyond the comfort zone. Harvard College undergraduates share their inspirational stories about global engagement, intellectual exploration and personal discovery made possible through experiences abroad.

Featuring welcome remarks from Dr. Margot Gill, University Marshal and Administrative Dean for International Affairs in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Reception to follow. 

Hosted by Harvard’s Asia Center, Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard China Fund, Korea Institute, Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Program on US-Japan Relations, Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, and Weatherhead Center for International Affairs.

This event is free and open to all. 

Oct
22
Mon
Lecture/Panel, Reception

Women and the Global Health Workforce: Driving Action for Health and Gender Equity

4:00PM to 7:00PM
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (Kresge Cafeteria) 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115

From Bamako to Bogota, Bangalore to Boston, women are the majority of healthcare providers worldwide, yet underrepresented in leadership in science and medicine. Join the Harvard Global Health Institute and the Women and Health Initiative of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health for a symposium to discuss women’s roles within the health system and the transformation possible – leading to gender equality on the path towards health for all. Register HERE

Keynote: 
Patricia Garcia, Former Minister of Health of Peru, Richaed L. and Ronay A. Menschel Senior Leadership Fellow, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Speakers: 
Lori Adelman, Director of Youth Engagement, Women Deliver
Jessica Cohen, Bruce A. Beal and Alexander S. Beal Associate Professor of Global Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health 
Ashish Jha, K.T. Li Professor of Global Health and Director, Harvard Global Health Institute
Ingrid Katz, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Associate Faculty Director, Harvard Global Health Institute
Ana Langer, Professor of the Practice of Public Health and Coordinator of the Dean's Special Initiative in Women and Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Kathryn Rexrode, Associate Physician, Department of Preventative Medicine & General Internal Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital
Nancy Street, Julia and Harold Plotnick Professor of Global Nursing, UMass Dartmouth College of Nursing

This event is hosted by the Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the Harvard Global Health Institute.  
This event is free and open to all, registration required.

Oct
22
Mon
Performance, Other

A Political Poetry: Reading and Conversation with Solmaz Sharif

4:15PM
Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge MA 02138

Award-winning poet and Radcliffe Institute visiting scholar Solmaz Sharif will read selected poems and participate in a moderated discussion.

Her work has been recognized with a “Discovery”/Boston Review Poetry Prize, a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award, and a National Endowment for the Arts Literature Fellowship. She has also received a 2016 Lannan Literary Fellowship, the 2017 Theodore H. Holmes ’51 and Bernice Holmes National Poetry Prize from the Lewis Center for the Arts at Princeton University, and the 2017 PEN Center USA Literary Award for Poetry.

This event is part of the Roosevelt Poetry Readings at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. The Roosevelt Poetry Readings are made possible by a donation to help bring poets of recognized stature to the Institute.

Hosted by the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University.

Open to the entire Harvard community. Register online by clicking the event title.

Oct
22
Mon
Lecture/Panel

Conceptualizing the Holodomor: Ukraine’s Great Famine from Lemkin to Applebaum

4:30PM to 6:15PM
Room S-050, CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA

Gennadi Pobereƶny will discuss the conceptual evolution of the notion of the Holodomor from its first public appearance in the early 1960s until present, and its juxtaposition with another relevant concept of genocide. The latter was conceived in the mid-1940s by Raphaël Lemkin, who referred to what would later become known as the Holodomor as one of his primary cases for conceptualizing genocide. Through the 1960s and 1970s the Ukrainian diaspora in Europe and North America had to effectively drop the genocide discourse in an attempt to convince the world that the Great Famine did indeed take place, facing paramount obstacles -- the vehement Soviet denials and lacking documentary evidence. The late 1980s and 1990s saw the re-emergence of the genocide claims and the re-invigoration of the scholarly pursuit of both subjects in relation to each other, while the 2000s and the 2010s were marked by the extreme politicization of the Holodomor-as-genocide discourse, on the one hand, and its increasing adoption by the public and its wider recognition world-wide, on the other. The recent seminal book by Anne Applebaum, who attempted to summarize and contextualize the academic discourse on the Holodomor, just happened to add more fuel to the flame of the Holodomor debates. Seminar presentation will be followed by a Q&A session.

Gennadi Pobereƶny, Visiting Professor of Political Science, Ukrainian Free University; Harvard Ukranian Research Institute Associate

Hosted by the Harvard Ukranian Research Institute (HURI) as part of its Seminar in Ukranian Studies. 
This event is free and open to all. 

 

Oct
22
Mon
Reception, Other

The Judge – film screening and discussion

5:00PM to 7:00PM
Wasserstein 1019, 1585 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA (HLS campus)

Palestinian Judge Kholoud Al-Faqih became the first woman to be appointed to a Shari'a bench in the Middle East in 2009. The Judge follows her journey, from defending victims of domestic violence as a young lawter, to her tenacious ability to maintain her position - showcasing the power of women's leadership both inside and outside of the courtroom. The screening will be followed by a discussion with the film's Director, Erika Cohn, and Palestine legal historian Professor Elizabeth Brownson (University of Wisconsin Parkside), moderated by Salma Waheedi, Lecturer on Law, Clinical Instructor at the International Human Rights Clinic, and Associate Director of the Islamic Legal Studies Program: Law and Social Change. 

Dinner will be served. 

Co-sponsored by the Human Rights Program at Harvard Law School, the Middle East Initiative at the Harvard Kennedy School, the Religious Literacy Project at the Harvard Divinity Schook, the Harvard Journal of Law and Gender, the Julis-Rabinowitz Program on Jewish and Israeli Law, and HLS Advocates for Human Rights
This event is free and open to all. 

 

Tuesday 23rd

Oct
23
Tue
Lecture/Panel

The Classical World and the Pilgrimage to Santiago in Comparative Perspective: Anthropology, Art and the Harvard Legacy

11:00AM to 12:30PM
RCC at Harvard Conference Room, 26 Trowbridge Street, Cambridge MA

The phenomenon of pilgrimage has had a fundamental role in the development of western and non-western civilisations, facilitating cultural and artistic exchange, and promoting economic growth and social mobility. Focusing on the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela, this workshop seeks to explore the impact of this phenomenon in the construction of Europe analysing, from a comparative perspective, its importance in Antiquity and in the Middle Ages. As it will emerge from this discussion, there exist numerous elements of connection between pilgrimage in the Greco-Roman world and in the Christian Middle Ages, with surprising modes of continuity in art, literature, and myth. It was precisely at Harvard, with the monumental work of A. Kingsley Porter (Romanesque Sculpture of the Pilgrimage Roads, 12 vols. [1923]) where these aspects of medieval pilgrimage began to be considered in their full implications emphasising their importance to understand contemporary society, by comparing them with the way movement and multi-culturalism contributed to the creation of the dynamism of the American melting-pot.

Speakers:
Francisco Prado-Vilar, Director of Cultural and Artistic Projects at RCC at Harvard, Scientific Director of the Andrew W. Mellon Program for the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela;
Diego Chapinal-Heras, RCC Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of the Classics at Harvard University

Hosted by Real Colegio Complutense (RCC) at Harvard; Cultural and Artistic Projects at RCC; Department of the Classics at Harvard University. 
This event is free and open to all. 

Oct
23
Tue
Lecture/Panel

From Eco-Aesthetics to Eco-Justice: The Ecological Discourses in Vietnamese Independent Art Cinema

12:00PM to 1:30PM
Common Room, 2 Divinity Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138

Speaker:
Hoang Cam Giang, Lecturer, University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Vietnam National University - Hanoi; Harvard-Yenching Institute Visiting Scholar 2018-19

Chair/Discussant:
Karen Thornber, Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations and of Comparative Literature, Harvard University; Victor and William Fung Director, Harvard Asia Center.

Hosted by Harvard-Yenching Institute Lunchtime Seminar; co-sponsored with the Harvard University Asia Center.
This event is free and open to all. 

Oct
23
Tue
Lecture/Panel

Human Rights and the Post-1945 International Order: A 70-Year Retrospective on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

12:00PM to 1:45PM
CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street, Room S354

A retrospective on the universal declaration of human rights.

Speaker:
Nadia Boyadjieva, Professor of International Law and International Relations, Balkan Studies Institute, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences; Visiting Scholar, Davis Center 

Hosted by the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies as part of the Sakharov Seminar on Human Rights. 
This event is free and open to all. 

Oct
23
Tue
Lecture/Panel

"Trump's Trade Policy: Can Theories of International Political Economy Explain It?"

12:30PM to 2:00PM
Bowie-Vernon Room (K262), CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street

Speaker:
Keisuke Iida, Academic Associate, Program on U.S.-Japan Relations, Harvard University; Professor, Graduate Schools for Law and Politics, The University of Tokyo

Moderator:
Christina Davis Professor of Government and Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University

Hosted by the Program on US-Japan Relations at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs. Co-sponsored by the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government, Harvard Kennedy School. 
This event is free and open to all. 

Oct
23
Tue
Lecture/Panel

The EU-US Battle for Global Markets: Reflections Facing Trump’s Taxation and Commercial Strategy

1:30PM to 3:00PM
Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies, Harvard University, 27 Kirkland Street, Adolphus Busch Hall at Cabot Way, Cambridge, MA 02138, Goldman Room

The event intends to analyze the impact of corporate taxation on European Union-United States relations in light of global competition. In particular, the focus is on the EU's reaction to Trump’s taxation and commercial strategy and on global competition in the digitalized economy. The seminar will also discuss the technical implications of US tax reform and current EU law developments (such as anti-avoidance, state aids and bilateral investment treaties), including those occurring at the level of EU member states.

Presenters:
Paolo Arginelli – IPBS MIM Master, Faculty, Catholic University, Italy;
Yariv Brauner – Professor, Alumni Research Scholar, Levin College of Law, University of Florida;
Ana Paula Dourado – Professor of Tax Law and European Tax Law, School of Law, University of Lisbon;
Pasquale Pistone – Academic Chairman; Jean Monnet Ad Personam Chair in European Tax Law, IBFD; WU Vienna;
Stephen Shay – Senior Lecturer, Harvard Law School.

Chair:
José Manuel Martinez Sierra – Jean Monnet ad Personam Professor in EU Law and Government, Real Colegio Complutense & CES Local Affiliate, Harvard University.

Hosted by the Minda de Gunzberg Center for European Studies. Sponsored by the EU Law and Government Study Group.

Oct
23
Tue
Lecture/Panel

Harvard beyond Harvard: Learn, teach, and engage abroad!

2:15PM to 3:00PM
Tsai Auditorium, 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA 02138

Every year, new program templates are developed, aiming to meet the increasing challenges that emerge from a globalized educational environment, the University’s expanding international presence, and the students’ increasing need for participation in creative activities that reflect their studies and intellectual interests. This event will offer the opportunity to listen to students talking about an innovative study abroad experience that connects different phases of students’ educational life: learning on campus, teaching abroad, and engaging with a different educational and cultural environment.

Presenters:

Salvatore DeFrancesco, Harvard College, Social Studies, HSSP TF 2018
Rohan Shah, Harvard College, Social Studies, HSSP TF 2018
Audrey Sheehy, Harvard College, Social Studies, HSSP TF 2018
Bonnie Talbert, Lecturer & Assistant Director of Studies, Committee on Degrees in Social Studies
Don Tontiplaphol, Social Studies 10 Course Director and Preceptor in the Philosophy and Methods of the Social Sciences, Social Studies

Moderator: Nicolas Prevelakis, Lecturer on Social Studies & Assistant Director of Curricular Development, Center for Hellenic Studies

Hosted by Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies, in collaboration with the Committee on Degrees in Social Studies.
This event is free and open to the public.

Oct
23
Tue
Lecture/Panel, Information Session/Networking

Global Mental Health Showcase & Film Screening

4:00PM to 8:00PM
Kresge Cafeteria 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

The GlobalMentalHealth@Harvard Initiative is excited to invite students, faculty, organizations, programs, and departments to share their work on global mental health in Boston, the US or abroad at our showcase event during Harvard Worldwide Week! Our goal is to introduce students and trainees to the diverse global work at Harvard on mental health; form new collaborations across the university, and showcase the incredible interdisciplinary work being done throughout our Boston community.

Participating groups include:

Following the showcase networking event we will be screening parts of the documentaries and hosting the filmmakers for a panel discussion:
• "Still We Rise" by Molly Knight Raskin
• “Sadness in Comedy: Unfounded Stereotype, or Something More?" by John Ball (FAS '20)

RSVP here. 

Hosted by GlobalMentalHealth@Harvard Initiative.

This event requires registration and is free to attend.

Oct
23
Tue
Lecture/Panel, Reception

Political Sociology and the People's Health: Book Launch Celebration with Author Harvard Sociology Professor Jason Beckfield

4:00PM to 6:00PM
Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies, 9 Bow Street, Harvard Square, Cambridge

Lisa Berkman will introduce Jason Beckfield, who will give a 15–30 minute talk about his new book—the first in an innovative series edited by Professor Nancy Krieger that is dedicated to exploring ecosocial approaches to topics across population health. The new book by Beckfield “advances the debate over social inequalities in health by offering a new set of provocative hypotheses around how health is distributed in and across populations.” A reception will follow the talk and refreshments will be served. The book will be sold at a discount ($20.00 if cash or check; 30% off if ordered online) and Professor Beckfield will be on hand to sign copies.

Presenters:

Lisa Berkman, Thomas D. Cabot Professor of Public Policy, Epidemiology, and Global Health and Population and Director of the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health;
Jason Beckfield, Chair and Professor of Sociology, Faculty of Arts and Sciences and Associate Director of the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Hosted by the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies.

This event is free and open to the public.

Oct
23
Tue
Lecture/Panel

Saud Alsanousi and Jonathan Wright on "The Bamboo Stalk"

4:30PM to 6:30PM
Center for Middle Eastern Studies, 38 Kirkland St, Cambridge, MA 02138

Kuwaiti novelist Saud Alsanousi and translator Jonathan Wright will discuss IPAF-Award winning novel "The Bamboo Stalk" and its translation to English. "The Bamboo Stalk" is a daring work which looks objectively at the phenomenon of foreign workers in Arab countries and deals with the problem of identity through the life of a young man of mixed race who returns to Kuwait, the ‘dream’ or ‘heaven’ which his mother had described to him since he was a child.

The International Prize for Arabic Fiction (IPAF) is the most prestigious and important literary prize in the Arab world. Its aim is to reward excellence in contemporary Arabic creative writing and to encourage the readership of high quality Arabic literature internationally through the translation and publication of winning and shortlisted novels in other major languages.

Hosted by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies as part of its Arabian Peninsula Studies Lecture Series. 
This event is free and open to all. 

Oct
23
Tue
Lecture/Panel

The Decline and Persistence of the ‘Old Boy’: Public Schools and Elite Recruitment 1897-2016

4:30PM to 6:00PM
Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies Goldman Room, Harvard University, 27 Kirkland Street, Adolphus Busch Hall at Cabot Way Cambridge, MA 02138

In this talk, the speaker draws on 120 years of biographical data (N = 120,764) contained within the Who’s Who — a unique catalogue of the British elite — to explore the changing relationship between elite schools and elite recruitment. The research suggests that the propulsive power of Britain’s private schools has diminished significantly over time. This is driven, in part, by the wane of military and religious elites, and the rise of women in the labor force. However, the most dramatic declines followed key educational reforms that increased access to the credentials needed to access elite trajectories, while also standardizing and differentiating them. Notwithstanding these changes, public schools remain extraordinarily powerful channels of elite formation. Even today, the alumni of the nine Clarendon schools are 94 times more likely to reach the British elite than are those, who attended any other school. Alumni of elite schools also retain a striking capacity to enter the elite even without passing through other prestigious institutions, such as Oxford, Cambridge, or private members clubs.The speaker's research not only points to the dogged persistence of the “old boy,” but also underlines the theoretical importance of reviving and refining the study of elite recruitment.

Presenter:

Sam Friedman, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, London School of Economics.

Hosted by the Minda de Gunzberg Center for European Studies as part of the Seminar on Social Exclusion and Inclusion event series.

This event is free and open to the public.

Oct
23
Tue
Other

Operation Wedding | Film Screening

7:00PM to 9:30PM
Tsai Auditorium, CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street, Room S010

(Israel-Latvia 2016, 62 minutes, English, Hebrew, Russian with English subtitles) Leningrad, 1970.

A group of young Soviet Jews who were denied exit visas, plots to hijack an empty plane and escape the USSR. It started as a fantasy; under the disguise of a trip to a local wedding, the "hijackers" would buy every ticket on a 12-seater plane, so there would be no passengers but them. Seized by the KGB just a few steps from boarding, they were subjected to a chilling show trial, while the whole world watched. Two of them were sentenced to death. 45 years later, filmmaker Anat Zalmanson-Kuznetsov reveals the compelling story of her parents, "heroes" in the West, "terrorists" in Russia, even today. Q&A after the screening with Director Anat Zalmanson-Kuznetsov. 

Open to the public. Limited space, RSVP required

Speakers:
Bob Gordon, Former Chairman, The Dniepro Kehillah Project (DKP), Combined Jewish Philanthropies
Mark Kramer, Program Director, Cold War Studies Program, Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies
Tatiana Yankelevich, Independent Scholar

Hosted by the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies. Co-sponsored by The Dniepro Kehillah Project (DKP), Combined Jewish Philanthropies. 

Oct
23
Tue
Lecture/Panel, Performance

Vampires, Ghouls, and Alexander the Two-Horned: An Otherworldly Evening of 17th-Century Myth and 21st-Century Music

8:00PM to 10:00PM
The Memorial Church of Harvard University, 1 Harvard Yard, Cambridge, MA 02138

Please join the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at Harvard Memorial Church to celebrate the season of vampires, ghouls and zombies with a talk on vampire trouble in the Ottoman world by Professor Cemal Kafadar and a performance of "A Gentleman of Istanbul", Symphony for Strings, Percussion, Piano, Oud, Ney & Tenor, inspired by the musings of Ottoman Traveler Evliya Çelebi, composed by Mehmet Ali Sanlıkol and performed by Grammy-nominated Boston string orchestra A Far Cry.

Note: This event is open to the public; no registration or tickets required. Seating is limited.

Hosted by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies. 

Wednesday 24th

Oct
24
Wed
Lecture/Panel, Performance

Taichi & Chan | Interactive Lecture and Demonstration

11:00AM to 1:00PM
Memorial Church Patio, Tercentenary Theatre, Harvard Yard

How do we unify nature and humanity? Can we use our own body to alleviate eye or back pain fatigue associated with long days of study and desk work? In what ways can we fuse the practice of Traditional Chinese Medicine with modern day living? 

This signature Event is part of a multi-day Eastern Wisdom Forum featuring lectures and demonstrations Sunday 21 - Thursday 25 October. Wednesday's event includes a Taichi performance and group practice led by Master Anlin Wang on the fusion of traditional Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism-based etiquette greeting gesture and its application on the balance of internal energy of a person , a short lecture (in Chinese with simultaneous English translation) on the relation between Taichi, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), and their implications for the wellness of modern people; a short lecture on the cultural and philosophical background of these etiquette and its relation with Yi Ching, the source of all ancient wisdom, and the ultimate pursuit of the unification of human and nature. Participants will be invited  to come up to the stage to learn simple Taichi self-defense trick, as well as simple acupressure tricks to alleviate eye fatigues, back pains, etc. from office work.

Additional opportunities to view and develop skill in this ancient practice on Tuesday 23 October and Thuesday 25 October, 11am-1pm at the Science Center Plaza. 

Hosted by Harvard GSAS Anlin Taichi Wudao Association. 
This event is free and open to all.

Oct
24
Wed
Lecture/Panel

Democratic Learning in Armenia: How Does it Compare to Color Revolutions?

12:00PM to 1:45PM
CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street, Room S354

Miriam Lanskoy is Senior Director for Russia and Eurasia at the National Endowment for Democracy. In 2003 she was awarded a PhD in international affairs from Boston University for her dissertation on the Russian presidency, the Chechen wars, and social and political problems of the North Caucasus. She has fourteen years of experience in political analysis and democracy promotion in post-Soviet Eurasia and in 2005 became a term member in the Council on Foreign Relations. She has published articles in Journal of Democracy, SAIS Review, and The Fletcher Forum of World Affairs and has appeared on numerous panels and conferences to discuss political developments in Russia and Eurasia, testified in Congress, and appeared on the PBS Newshour.

Hosted by the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies as part of the Sakharov Seminar on Human Rights. 
This event is free and open to all. 

Oct
24
Wed
Lecture/Panel

Intermittent Employment as a Source of Bias? An Experimental Approach Examining Types of Discrimination

12:00PM to 1:30PM
CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Bowie-Vernon Room (K262)

Speaker:
Kate Weisshaar, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

Chairs:
Mary Brinton, Faculty Associate; Chair, Weatherhead Initiative on Gender Inequality. Reischauer Institute Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology, Harvard University.
Jason Beckfield, Executive Committee; Faculty Associate; Chair, Weatherhead Initiative on Gender Inequality. Chair; Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology, Harvard University.

Light lunch will be served. This event is free and open to all. 

This seminar is sponsored by the Weatherhead Initiative on Gender Inequality, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs.

Oct
24
Wed
Lecture/Panel

Environmental Health Capacity Building in Asia

1:00PM to 2:30PM
Harvard Chan School, Landmark Center 4th floor West, Room 414a, 401 Park Drive, Boston, MA 02215

The largest health effects of environmental contamination are being experienced in developing countries. Harvard is partnering with institutions in Asia to build local capacity to understand these local environmental exposures, quantify their health effects and develop effective prevention strategies. This panel will describe several ongoing environmental health capacity building projects in South Asia and China including
• Building environmental health capacity in India
• Measuring the developmental health effects of metal exposure in Bangladesh
• Quantifying and mediating effects of arsenic exposures in Bangladesh
• Systematic measurement of sustainable farming practices in India
• Applying new sensors to study healthy buildings in China

Presenters: 
Nancy Long Sieber, PhD. Adjunct Lecturer on Physiology, Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Maitreyi Mazumdar, MD. Associate Professor of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Associate Professor in the Department Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
David Christiani, MD, MPH. Elkan Blout Professor of Environmental Genetics Departments of Environmental Health and Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Lindsay Jaacks, PhD. Assistant Professor of Global Health, Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Joseph  Allen, DSc, MPH. Assistant Professor of Exposure Assessment Science, Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Hosted by the Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. 
This event is free and open to all. 

Oct
24
Wed
Lecture/Panel

Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary Nigeria: A Personal Perspective

1:00PM to 2:00PM
651 Huntington Ave., 7th Fl, Boston MA 02115; Room: FXB 710

There is no safe space and Queer people are arrested, lynched and in some cases burnt to death. Those who are Queer are forced to hide their identity as even the law criminalizes LGBTQ+ people and imposes sentences of up to fourteen years imprisonment. Romeo Oriogun, a Nigerian poet whose poems have appeared on Prairie Schooner, Connotation Press, Brittle Paper, and others, will be talking about this from his personal experience and also from various studies that have been carried out about the Queer community in Nigeria. He is currently an Artist Protection Fellow, a Scholar-at-Risk Fellow at the Hutchins Center for African American and African Studies, and also a Visiting Poet in the English Department at Harvard University.

Hosted by the Harvard FXB Center for Health and Human Rights as part of its Work In Progress Series. 
This event is free and open to all. 

Oct
24
Wed
Lecture/Panel, Reception

Islam and Race

3:00PM to 5:00PM
Tsai Auditorium, CGIS South, Room 010, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA, 02138

From race issues in classical Islam to Islam’s life as an African religion, and from Muslims in the civil rights movement to the racialization of Muslims after 9/11 and the ensuing travel bans and registers. Please join the Alwaleed Islamic Studies Program for panel discussion on the intersections of race and Islam through history and around the world. Reception to follow. 

Panelists:
Khalil Abdur-Rashid, Muslim Chaplain to the University, Harvard University
Ahmed Ragab, Richard T. Watson Associate Professor of Science and Religion, Harvard Divinity School
Kimberly Wortmann, Assistant Professor of the Study of Religions, Wake Forest University

Hosted by the Prince Bin Talal Alwaleed Islamic Studies Program. 
This event is free and open to all. 

Oct
24
Wed
Lecture/Panel

Unelected Power: A Book Presentation and Discussion with Sir Paul Tucker

3:30PM to 5:00PM
Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies, Adolphus Busch Hall at Cabot Way, 27 Kirkland Street Cambridge, MA 02138

Pervasive reliance on technocratic government risks moving us all towards undemocratic liberalism, and a popular backlash. Among technocrats, few reach further than central bankers, who emerged from the financial crisis as a third great pillar of unelected power alongside the judiciary and the military. In his new book Unelected Power: The Quest for Legitimacy in Central Banking and the Regulatory State, Paul Tucker outlines principles of delegation that can bring independent agencies into line with the deep political values of democracy, the rule of law, and constitutionalism.

Presenter:
Sir Paul Tucker, Chair, The Systemic Risk Council; Senior Fellow, Center for European Studies, Harvard University; Deputy Governor, The Bank of England (2009-2013)

Chair and Discussant:
Lawrence H. Summers, Charles W. Eliot University Professor and President Emeritus, Harvard University

Discussants:
Daphna Renan, Assistant Professor of Law, Harvard Law School
Alberto Alesina, Nathaniel Ropes Professor of Political Economy, Harvard University; Faculty Associate, Center for European Studies, Harvard University;
Eric Beerbohm, Professor of Government, Harvard University; 
Kathleen McNamara, Professor of Government and Foreign Service, Georgetown University;

Hosted by the Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies as part of the European Economic Policy Forum. Co-sponsored by Center for American Polical Studies, Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government, Harvard Kennedy School, and Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Harvard University.

This event is free and open to the public.

Oct
24
Wed
Lecture/Panel, Social, Reception

International Book Blitz

4:00PM to 6:00PM
CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street

Listen to Harvard authors present their global books in a café-style setting. A panel of Weatherhead Center Faculty Associates will each give an eight-minute “speed talk” about their recent book, launching us into compelling issues from around the world, featuring stories and research from Kenya, Japan, India, the United Kingdom and Mexico, to name a few countries represented thematically in this two-hour event. Refreshments will be provided.

Hosted by the Weather Center for International Affairs.

This event is free and open to the public.

Oct
24
Wed
Lecture/Panel, Seminar

Why Would "We" Help "Them"? The Politics of Search and Rescue in the Mediterranean Sea

4:00PM
Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge MA 02138

Part of the 2018–2019 Fellows' Presentation Series

Lecture by Hernan del Valle RI '19

Hernan del Valle was involved in Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) operations in the Mediterranean Sea, which over the past three years rescued tens of thousands of refugees and migrants fleeing Libya toward Europe in fragile boats. As MSF’s head of humanitarian affairs and advocacy, del Valle was a privileged witness to the difficult political challenges that emerged for MSF throughout this operation, not only in its relation with European governments but also engaging with a civil society bitterly divided by debates on migration.

His work at Radcliffe reflects on the role of and challenges for MSF in assisting people marginalized by state policy in this context. It explores the fundamental questions that emerge around borders, exclusion, identity, nationalism, citizenship, and fundamental rights in contemporary Europe.

Hosted by Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University.

Open to the entire Harvard community.

Oct
24
Wed
Lecture/Panel

The Other Iran: Unintended Modernity in the Islamic Republic

4:15PM to 5:30PM
WAPPP Cason Seminar Room, Room 102, Taubman Building, Harvard Kennedy School

A seminar with Djavad Salehi-Isfahani, Professor of Economics at Virginia Tech, Non-Resident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, and Research Fellow at the Economic Research Forum in Cairo.

Hosted by the Middle East Initiative at Harvard Kennedy School. 
This event is free and open to the public. 

Oct
24
Wed
Lecture/Panel

Urban Innovation Hubs: a Strategy for Developed Countries to Boost Economic Prosperity and Strengthen Employment Resilience

5:00PM to 6:30PM
RCC at Harvard Conference Room, 26 Trowbridge St., Cambridge MA

The Urban Innovation Research group at Harvard SEAS addresses a major societal challenge in Developed Countries: how to envision economic eco-systems which unleash both the individual and communitarian potential, enabling the creation of high quality, stable employment within urban areas, thus providing a societal response to foreseen mass job destruction due to the emergence of automation, AI, and robotics. The Urban Innovation study group will share their research on how Complexity Science and Network Theory-driven Machine Learning mathematical models can be deployed to support Urban Design criteria, by liberating the potential non-linear benefits of strategic aggregation of talent and knowledge-intensive activities in Innovation Campuses, operating in synergy with high value-added export hubs within metropolitan areas.

Event Presenters: 
Ramon Gras, Urban Innovation Researcher at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences;
Jeremy Burke, Urban Innovation Researcher at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

Hosted by the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard.
This event is free and open to all.  

Thursday 25th

Oct
25
Thu
Exhibit

Seven Moments in Russian History: A Pop-up Exhibit

9:00AM
Edison and Newman Room, Houghton Library, Harvard Yard, Cambridge, MA

On view Thursday 25-Monday 29 October 2018 only! 

To celebrate the founding of the Russian Research Center at Harvard seven decades ago, Houghton Library has selected seven treasures from its rich collections of Russian material to share with visitors and alumni. See the original telegram sent by John Reed to the New York Call in the midst of the October Revolution, a silk embroidered book from Catherine the Great's library, and other Russian rarities.

Curated by Christine Jacobson, A.M. '16, Russian, Eastern Europe and Central Asia Program (REECA).

Hosted by the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies as part of its 70th Anniversary Celebration
This event is free and open to all. See Houghton Library hours to plan your visit. 

Oct
25
Thu
Social, Information Session/Networking

Harvard Global Support Services Open House for Students

11:00AM to 2:00PM
114 Mt. Auburn Street, Fifth Floor, Cambridge, MA

Are you a Harvard student planning to study, research, or work abroad? Join us for an open house to meet our staff, learn about international resources to plan your trip and keep you safe, get a free passport-like photo taken, and enjoy trivia, prizes, and food.

Hosted by Harvard Global Support Services. 
This event is open to students; please bring your Harvard ID. 

Oct
25
Thu
Lecture/Panel

From Missionary Cook to Counter-Revolutionary: Five Generations of a Chinese Christian Family

12:00PM to 2:00PM
Conference Room, Center for the Study of World Religions, HDS, 42 Francis Ave., Cambridge

Through the 150-year saga of a single family, painstakingly researched by award-winning journalist Jennifer Lin, Shanghai Faithful vividly dramatizes the nascent rise of Chinese Christians and the remarkable religious evolution of the world’s most populous nation. Lin will discuss why she wrote the book as well as how she pieced together the family saga using the techniques of an investigative reporter. The lives of two main characters—her grandfather, the Rev. Lin Pu-chi, and her great-uncle, Watchman Nee—personify the bifurcation of the church in China today.

Jennifer Lin is a former reporter for The Philadelphia Inquirer, where she worked for 31 years, including postings as a New York financial correspondent; Washington, D.C. foreign affairs reporter; and Asia bureau chief based in Beijing. Based in Doylestown, Pennsylvania, Lin is currently working on a documentary about the Philadelphia Orchestra's history and ongoing engagement in China.

Hosted by the Center for the Study of World Religions, Harvard Divinity School. 
This event is free and open to all. 

 

Oct
25
Thu
Lecture/Panel, Other

The Third Murder: A Film Screening and Discussion on Capital Punishment in Japan

12:00PM to 3:30PM
Wasserstein Hall, Third Floor Room 3019, 1585 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02138

A film screening of award-winning director Hirokazu Kore'eda's 2017 legal thriller "The Third Murder," winner of six Japan Academy Awards, including Best Picture. The film follows an attorney tasked with defending a confessed murderer facing the death penalty. The showing will be followed by a discussion of capital punishment in Japan, one of the few developed democracies which enforce the death penalty, and its future following the highly publicized executions of the 1995 Tokyo sarin gas attackers in July of 2018. Panelists will include Mark Ramseyer, Mitsubishi Professor of Japanese Legal Studies at Harvard Law School, and Carol Steiker, Henry J. Friendly Professor of Law and head of the capital punishment clinic at Harvard Law School. Lunch will be provided.

Hosted by the Harvard Asia Law Society.

Oct
25
Thu
Lecture/Panel

Press Freedoms in Asia: Perspectives from China, Myanmar and Thailand

12:15PM to 1:45PM
Belfer Case Study Room, S020 CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge Street Cambridge, MA

Panelists:
David Barboza, Business correspondent, The New York Times Former Shanghai Bureau Chief, The New York Times; winner of the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for international reporting
Esther Htusan, Associated Press reporter
Puangthong R. Pawakapan, Associate Professor, Faculty of Political Science, Chulalongkorn University Visiting Scholar, Harvard-Yenching Institute

Moderator:
Mable Chan, Fairbank Center Associate in Research Former ABC News producer and Hong Kong TVB news correspondent

Hosted by the Harvard University Asia Center and the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies. 
This event is free and open to all. 

Oct
25
Thu
Lecture/Panel

Environmental Health Capacity Building in Africa and the Middle East

1:00PM to 2:30PM
Harvard Chan School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Ave, Building 1, Room 1302

The largest health effects of environmental contamination are being experienced in developing countries. Harvard is partnering with institutions in Africa and the Middle East to build local capacity to understand these local environmental exposures, quantify their health effects and develop effective prevention strategies. This panel will describe several ongoing environmental health capacity building projects in Africa and the Middle East including
• Exploring the health effects of climate change in the Middle East
• Tourism and Environmental Health in a Changing Climate, Tunisia
• Examining the links between human health and the environment in Madagascar
• Measuring indoor air quality and respiratory morbidity in Uganda

Presenters:

Christopher Golden, Assistant Professor of Nutrition and Planetary Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Petros Koutrakis, Professor of Environmental Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Dr. Crystal North, Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital
John Spengler, Akira Yamaguchi Professor of Environmental Health and Human Habitation, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Hosted by the Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Harvard Chan-NEHS Center for Environmental Health.

This event is free and open to the public.

 

Oct
25
Thu
Lecture/Panel

How to Think About Democratic Dissatisfaction and Populism in the West

4:15PM to 5:30PM
Ash Center Foyer, 124 Mount Auburn St., Suite 200N, Cambridge, MA

Join Sheri Berman, Professor of Political Science at Barnard College, Columbia University, for a discussion analyzing various explanations for growing dissatisfaction with liberal democracy and rising populism in the West. The talk will cover some of the main causes put forward by scholars and pundits, assess the evidence for these various causes, and suggest some ways the research agenda and our understandings of these crucial phenomena can move forward. Tarek Masoud, Professor of Public Policy and Sultan of Oman Professor of International Relations, will moderate.

Hosted by the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation as part of the Democracy in Hard Places Initiative.

This event is free and open to the public.

Oct
25
Thu
Lecture/Panel, Information Session/Networking, Reception

Strengthening Rwanda’s Research Ethics Review Capacity

4:45PM to 6:30PM
Harvard School of Dental Medicine, 190 Longwood Avenue, REB Auditorium, Boston, MA 02115

Over the past few years Rwanda has made great strides in improving its health care, both clinically and in research. Faculty from Harvard, including Harvard School of Dental Medicine and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health have been involved in these efforts and will be discussed during an hour long panel. Dr. Hackley has been assisting in the establishment of Rwanda’s first dental school. She will discuss the challenges in starting a dental school in a lesser developed country, as well as the satisfaction of doing so. With the aid of an NIH (Fogarty) grant Drs. Eyal, Friedland and Wikler have been training 10 Rwandans from a variety of backgrounds in health care in research ethics. The aim is to increase the ability and capacity of Rwanda to oversee an anticipated increase in medical research. Following the panel will be a networking reception.

Presenters:
Nir Eyal, Associate Professor of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Bernard Friedland, Associate Professor of Oral Medicine, Infection, and Immunity, Harvard School of Dental Medicine
Donna Hackley, Instructor in Oral Health Policy and Epidemiology, Harvard School of Dental Medicine
Daniel Wikler, Mary B. Saltonstall Professor of Ethics and Population Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Hosted by the Harvard School of Dental Medicine. 
This event is free and open to all. 

Oct
25
Thu
Lecture/Panel, Other

An Evening of Spanish Poetry: Three Contemporary Poets in Conversation

5:00PM to 6:00PM
RCC at Harvard Conference Room, 26 Trowbridge St., Cambridge MA

This poetry evening aims at presenting a conversation between three contemporary Spanish poets: María Salvador (El origen de la simetría, Icaria Ediciones, 2007)), Berta García Faet, (Corazón tradicionalista: poesía 2008–2011, La Bella Varsovia, 2017, and The Eligible Age, Song Bridge Press, 2018), Laura de la Parra (La Tramontana, La Isla de Siltolá, 2016 and Regalar el exilio, Harpo, 2016), each from a different region in Spain, live and study in the US. They have published poetry collections in Spain and their work has appeared in different journals and anthologies. They will discuss how their poetry intersects with migration, the body, the literary canon and current affairs. What does it mean to live and write in another language? How does it affect their creation in their mother tongue? How do their academic disciplines impact their poetry? These and other questions will be debated throughout the evening. There will be a reading and an open discussion at the end of the session.

Speakers: 
María Salvador is a PhD candidate in Japanese History of Art and Architecture at Harvard University. 

Laura de la Parra is a PhD candidate in English at Complutense University of Madrid and is currently a visiting researcher at Harvard University.  Her research is funded by the Spanish Ministry of Education. She holds a BA in English from Complutense University and an MSc in Creative Writing from the University of Edinburgh.

Berta García Faet is a PhD candidate in Hispanic Studies at Brown University. She holds a BA in Political Science and a BA in Humanities from Valencia University, an MA in Political Science from Pompeu Fabra University, an MA in Spanish from The City College of New York. 

Hosted by Real Colegio Complutense. 
This event is free and open to all. 

 

Oct
25
Thu
Lecture/Panel

Generation MBS: Understanding Social and Political Change in Saudi Arabia

5:00PM to 6:30PM
Center for Middle Eastern Studies (CMES), Room 102, 38 Kirkland St, Cambridge, MA 02138

The Center for Middle Eastern Studies (CMES) Arabian Peninsula Studies Lecture Series and the CMES Middle East Forum present "Generation MBS: Understanding Social and Political Change in Saudi Arabia" with Kristin Smith Diwan, Senior resident scholar, Arab Gulf States Institute, Washington, DC. Dr. Diwan Smith works in both comparative politics and international relations and specializes in Arab and Islamist politics, especially under Mohammed Bin Salman (MBS), Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia. Her current projects concern generational change, and the evolution of Islamism in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC).

Hosted by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies.

This event is free and open to the public.

 

Oct
25
Thu
Social, Information Session/Networking

Studying Abroad as a Person of Color: a mix and mingle event

5:00PM to 6:30PM
Buttrick Room, Student Oasis, Memorial Church, Harvard Yard, Cambridge MA

Harvard College students, join us for a discussion on how race and ethnicity play a role in your study abroad experience. Get your questions answered and hear from fellow students who have experiences and insights to share.

Sushi and desserts will be served!

Co-sponsored by Harvard GSS, the Office of International Education, the Asian American Women's Association, the Association of Black Harvard Women, the Black Men's Forum, Fuerza Latina, The Harvard Foundation, the Latino Men's Collective, Latinas United, Native Americans at Harvard College, and the South Asian Association.

This event is free and open to students at Harvard College. 

Oct
25
Thu
Lecture/Panel, Reception

Humanitarian Action Summit: Shaping the Future of Humanitarian Protection

5:15PM to 8:30PM
Harvard Art Museum, 32 Quincy Street Cambridge, MA

The Harvard Humanitarian Action Summit aims to educate the Harvard community on critical issues facing the humanitarian sector.The summit will begin on October 25th with a keynote address by the Director General of the International Committee of the Red Cross, Yves Daccord. Mr. Daccord will announce a call for research papers, followed by expert “Ted Talk” style presentations and a dynamic networking reception at the Harvard Art Museum.

Keynote: Yves Daccord, Director General of the International Committee of the Red Cross.


Speakers:
Michael VanRooyen, Director, Harvard Humanitarian Initiative (HHI);
Erin Downey, Senior Fellow, HHI
Tim Erickson, Chief of Medical Toxicology, Brigham & Women's Hospital;
Adrienne Fricke, Senior Fellow, HHI;
Faine Greenwood, Researcher, HHI;
Patrick Vinck, Director of Research, HHI;Assistant Professor, Department of Global Health and Population, HSPH, Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, HMS. 

Hosted by the Harvard Humanitarian Initative.
This event is free and open to the public. 

Oct
25
Thu
Exhibit

Treading the Borders: Immigration and the American Stage

5:30PM to 6:15PM
Houghton Library, Harvard Yard, Cambridge

Exhibition Tour! Join Matthew Wittmann, Curator of the Harvard Theatre Collection for a tour of Houghton Library’s Fall exhibition Treading the Borders: Immigration and the American Stage. Much of the richness and vitality of the performing arts in the United States derives from creative talent originating elsewhere. This exhibition explores how successive waves of immigration transformed the American stage, highlighting the virtuosity and resilience of a diverse group of actors, artists, and entertainers from the colonial era to the present day.

Hosted by the Houghton Library for rare books, manuscripts, archives and other primary resources.

This event is free and open to the public.

Oct
25
Thu
Social, Information Session/Networking, Reception

All Harvard African Mixer

6:00PM to 8:00PM
CGIS South Concourse, 1730 Cambridge St. Cambridge, MA 02138

The All Harvard African Mixer brings together Harvard students and student groups to network with faculty, fellows, staff and friends of Harvard. Student groups introduce their new leadership and promote their activities and events for the semester.

Hosted by the Center for African Studies, Harvard University.

Open to the Harvard community.

Oct
25
Thu
Lecture/Panel, Reception

Gaetano Salvemini Colloquium in Italian History and Culture | A Mind Never at Rest: A Tribute to Franco Modigliani (1918-2003)

6:15PM to 7:30PM
Lower Level Conference Room, Adolphus Busch Hall, 27 Kirkland Street at Cabot WayCambridge, MA 02138

The 2018 Salvemini lecture will focus on the life of Italian-American economist Franco Modigliani, who was the recipient of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 1985. Modigliani was a professor at UIUC, Carnegie Mellon University, and MIT. This annual lecture series is named in honor of the Italian anti-fascist historian Gaetano Salvemini, who spent much of his career as a professor in the Harvard department of history. This event is co-sponsored with the Consulate General of Italy in Boston and The Center for European Studies and aims to foster a spirit of intellectual inquiry into Italian history within the Harvard community and beyond. A reception will follow at 7:30-8:30pm.

Speakers:

Federico Rampini, US Bureau Chief & La Repubblica;

Francesco Giavazzi, Professor of Economics, Bocconi University, Milan

Hosted by the Minda de Gunzberg Center for European Studies.

Oct
25
Thu
Seminar, Lecture/Panel

Peace Making by All Means

6:30PM to 8:30PM
Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street, Plimpton Room (133)

Inspired by a family tragedy in his childhood, Saliya Weerakoon learned that peace was something you cannot compromise. Throughout a professional career of two decades as a marketing practitioner, he found numerous ways to use art, sports and education to connect people. In his early years, having lived through a youth-driven insurrection, and a separate devastating war in Sri Lanka, he began a lifelong study on the role of the humanities to humanity. Saliya recalls his experience working with political and business leaders, brands and the public to reveal the importance of the humanities studies in making the world a better place. Saliya Weerakoon is a senior corporate executive, angel investor and an educator with over 23 years of professional experience, is currently pursuing post-graduate studies in public leadership. He is a passionate advocate of youth empowerment and equal opportunity in education. Saliya has experience in the Asia Pacific and Middle-Eastern regions with iconic organizations and continues to advise policymakers in strategic communications.

Speaker:
Saliya Weerakoon, Executive Education Student, Harvard Kennedy School.

Chairs:
Doris Sommer, Faculty Associate; Chair, Weatherhead Initiative on Afro-Latin American Studies.
ra Jewell Williams, Jr. Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures, Department of Romance Languages and Literatures; Professor of African and African American Studies, Department of African and African American Studies; Director, Cultural Agents Initiative, Harvard University.
Vincenzo Bollettino, Director, Resilient Communities Program, Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, Harvard University.

One-hour presentation will be followed by discussion. RSVP is optional via Eventbrite. Event is free and open to the public.

This event is co-hosted by the Mahindra Humanities Center and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs as part of the Cultural and Humanitarian Agents seminar.  

Oct
25
Thu
Performance

International Comedy Night with Hari Kondabolu

7:00PM to 9:00PM
Harvard Commons, Smith Campus Center, 1350 Massachusetts Avenue

Break down barriers and create common ground! Join us for a dose of international-themed humor with comedian Hari Kondabolu and the Harvard College Stand-Up Comic Society.
About Hari Kondabolu: Hari Kondabolu is a comedian, writer, and podcaster based in Brooklyn, NY. He has been described by the New York Times as “one of the most exciting political comics in stand-up today.” In 2018, his Netflix special Warn Your Relatives was released and he was named one of Variety’s Top 10 Comics to Watch. Hari has released two comedy albums, Waiting for 2042 and Mainstream American Comic with the legendary indie rock label Kill Rock Stars. He has performed on the Late Show with David Letterman, Conan, Jimmy Kimmel Live, John Oliver’s NY Stand-Up Show, @Midnight, and has his own half-hour special on Comedy Central. He's a former writer and correspondent on the Chris Rock-produced FX TV show Totally Biased with W. Kamau Bell. In 2017, he released his critically acclaimed documentary The Problem with Apu on truTV. Hari is a regular on the public radio game show Wait Wait... Don’t Tell Me. Hari has also appeared on such notable radio shows and podcasts as Fresh Air with Terry Gross, WTF with Marc Maron, 2 Dope Queens, Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Prairie Home Companion, Wits, Studio 360, and Bullseye. He co-hosted the popular Politically Reactive podcast with W. Kamau Bell and currently co-hosts The Kondabolu Brothers Podcast with his brother, Ashok, on Earwolf. In the UK, Hari has established himself with appearances on BBC 3’s Russell Howard’s Good News, Live at the Electric, and Channel 4’s 8 out of 10 Cats. He also performed at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival in 2011. Hari attended both Bowdoin College and Wesleyan University, graduating from the former institution with a BA in comparative politics in 2004. A former immigrant rights organizer in Seattle, Hari also earned a master's in human rights from the London School of Economics in 2008. He was the NYU’s APA Institute’s “Artist in Residence” for the 2014–2015 academic year. Hari was born and raised in Queens, NY. He went to Townsend Harris High School and the school’s mascot, “Hari the Hawk,” was named after him during his senior year. (He sometimes fears that his greatest achievement was accomplished at seventeen.) Read more about Hari at www.harikondabolu.com.
About the Harvard College Stand-Up Comic Society: Founded in 2007, the Harvard College Stand-Up Comic Society (“Harvard College SUCS”) has been entertaining audiences in Sanders Theatre, Queens Head Pub, the Science Center, Fong Auditorium, the Gotham Comedy Club, and one random Rotary Club ever since. During their time with the Society, members have been seen at Improv Boston, the Comedy Studio, the Laugh Factory, and Last Comic Standing, and alumni have gone on to appear on Late Night, America's Got Talent, Last Comic Standing, the Boston Comedy Festival, and many other festivals and showcases. They've also been called a "ragtag band of misfits" by Cosmopolitan Magazine.

Hosted by the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs. 

This event is free and open to the public. 

Friday 26th

Oct
26
Fri
Lecture/Panel

Good Practices and Mutual Learning in Higher Education: Learnings from a Transatlantic Perspective

8:00AM to 5:30PM
RCC at Harvard Conference Room, 26 Trowbridge St., Cambridge MA

This workshop's main objective is to put the best experiences and leading strategies in the field of Higher Education from Harvard, the Greater Boston Area and in Europe on display and to foster interaction among representatives from University Centers, Departments and Schools and with representatives of governmental institutions from Europe and Spain. The RCC´s mission at Harvard University is to connect Harvard's system of higher education with the Spanish system of higher education represented by RCC Member Universities and Government bodies that in turn represent the system as a whole at the European and International level. This is done through the RCC´s different programs and initiatives. In this context, this workshop will be a space for mutual learning through a series of presentations of the different realities and strategies for the future as told by leading voices in the field of Higher Education innovation and management. From within Harvard, strategies from its schools, centers and departments will be presented and these will be complemented by experiences from other institutions of Higher Education in the Greater Boston Area. At the same time, RCC Member Universities will present their own experiences and this will be combined with the knowledge drawn from global strategies such as the ones from the European Association for International Education, at the European Level, and the Spanish Federal Agency for the Internationalization of Universities at the national level. The workshop will also include the perspectives from Harvard Graduate Students and Postdocs which will provide a vision from the point of view of two of the main stakeholders in the University system: students and researchers.

Hosted by RCC, Complutense University of Madrid, Technical University of Madrid, Moncloa Campus of International Excellence, Spanish Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports. 
This event is free and open to all. 

Oct
26
Fri
Social, Information Session/Networking, Reception

Harvard Asian American Alumni Alliance Global Summit

Oct 26, 8:00AM to Oct 28, 9:00PM
Harvard University - various campus venues, Cambridge, MA

Innovators | Instigators | Inspirers

Friday 26 - Sunday 28 October! 

Please join hundreds of Asian and Asian American alumni, students, and faculty from seven decades of classes, every Harvard school, multiple continents, and many walks of life for an exciting weekend of exploration, connection, and inspiration! - Hear from prominent and fascinating alumni from a broad range of fields who have made a mark on their communities and society at large.

- Engage with key players on some of the most provocative issues of our era, from technological disruption to immigration to affirmative action.
- Reconnect with an invaluable network by catching up with old friends and making new ones in an interactive setting.

Registration is open to Harvard alumni, students, faculty and staff as space permits. Please email

.

Oct
26
Fri
Lecture/Panel, Social, Information Session/Networking, Reception

The Undiscovered

9:30AM to 5:45PM
Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge MA 02138

Many great discoveries in science are surprises. To paraphrase Louis Pasteur, sometimes luck favors the prepared mind, as when Alexander Fleming discovered penicillin by noticing that mold growing accidentally in his lab seemed to kill bacteria. At other times, new instruments offer unanticipated revelations: Galileo trained his telescope on Jupiter and found it to have moons. And, occasionally, methodical experiments find exactly the opposite of what they sought to prove. Scientists intending to measure the deceleration of the Universe’s expansion, for example, found acceleration instead. The 2018 Radcliffe Institute science symposium will focus on how scientists explore realities they cannot anticipate. Speakers from across the disciplines of modern science will present personal experiences and discuss how to train scientists, educators, and funders to foster the expertise and open-mindedness needed to reveal undiscovered aspects of the world around us.

Welcome remarks provided by Radcliffe Dean Tomiko Brown-Nagin. View the full program to learn more.

Free and open to the public, with registration required.

Oct
26
Fri
Lecture/Panel

Askwith Forums – Leading the Global Education Movement: Advancing Educational Opportunity Around the World

12:00PM to 1:30PM
Askwith Lecture Hall, Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge, MA 02138

Several HGSE graduates, who have taken on leadership roles in educational governmental and non-governmental organizations, will discuss strategies, challenges, and lessons learned that have allowed them to significantly advance educational opportunity, inclusion, and equity around the world.

Speakers:
• Wilson Aiwuyor, Ed.M.'12, operations analyst, Global Partnership for Education
• Luis Garcia de Brigard, Ed.M.’07, founder and managing partner, Appian Education Ventures; former deputy minister of education, Colombia; GEII advisory board, HGSE
• Myra Khan, Ed.M.'15, education specialist, World Bank Group
• LeAnna Marr, Ed.M.’03, international education specialist and acting director, USAID Morocco

Moderator: Fernando Reimers, Ed.M.’84, Ed.D.’88, Ford Foundation Professor of Practice in International Education and director of the International Education Policy Program and of the Global Education Innovation Initiative, HGSE

 This event is free and open to the public

Oct
26
Fri
Lecture/Panel

Hot Topics in Global Health Financing: Accountability, Transition, and the Universal Health Coverage Agenda

12:00PM to 1:00PM
Bell Hall - Belfer 5th Floor. Harvard Kennedy School - 79, JFK Street

Since 2000, a complex global infrastructure has emerged to help finance public health improvement in low- and middle-income countries. These institutions have driven improvements in child survival, HIV mortality, and access to modern contraception—yet questions have arisen about their long-term sustainability and their alignment with long-term public health impart. Rachel Silverman, Assistant Director of Global Health Policy and Senior Policy Analyst at the Center for Global Development, will discuss three “hot topics” in global health financing: fiscal and programmatic accountability; strategies to “transition” countries away from reliance on external financing; and the movement away from “vertical”, disease-focused financing streams.

Hosted by Center for International Development (CID) as part of the CID Speaker Series.

This event is free and open to the public.

Oct
26
Fri
Lecture/Panel

Shaking Up the Established Order: Reflections on Recent Changes in Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines

12:15PM to 2:00PM
CGIS South Room S153, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA

Speaker:
Elsa Clavé, Postdoctoral Fellow, Harvard University Asia Center; Assistant Professor of Southeast Asian Studies, Goethe University; Frankfurt Associate Researcher, Centre Asie du Sud-Est (EHESS-CNRS), Paris. 

Hosted by Harvard University Asia Center as part of its Asia Center Seminar Series. 
This event is free and open to all. 

Oct
26
Fri
Fair, Information Session/Networking

Engaging the World: International Opportunities at Harvard College

1:00PM to 4:00PM
Cabot Library, Science Center, 1 Oxford Street

"Engaging the World" will be a chance for Harvard international centers and offices, academic departments, and selected student groups to highlight their activities abroad throughout the year. This showcase of Harvard’s best international will create greater awareness among undergraduates and encourage them to travel abroad throughout their Harvard careers.

Hosted by the Office of International Education (OIE), the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), and the Office of FAS International Affairs

Oct
26
Fri
Lecture/Panel

Archaeological Exploration of Sardis

3:00PM to 4:30PM
Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA. The lecture will take place in Menschel Hall, Lower Level. Please enter the museums via the entrance on Broadway. Doors will open at 2:30pm.

Since its founding in 1958 by Harvard and Cornell Universities, the Archaeological Exploration of Sardis has excavated, conserved, and published on aspects of the ancient city of Sardis in western Turkey from prehistoric through Islamic periods. The expedition is one of the longest running international projects sponsored at Harvard and is one of the oldest classical archaeological projects in the Mediterranean. As part of Worldwide Week at Harvard 2018, this event brings together Harvard Art Museums staff and Harvard faculty and students involved in the project to discuss their experiences of working at the site.

Hosted by the Harvard Art Museums.

This event is free and open to the public.

Saturday 27th

Oct
27
Sat
Performance, Reception

"Songs in the Fog" Performance by Shinja Choi

4:00PM to 5:00PM
Hunnewell Building Lawn, Arnold Arboretum, 125 Arborway Boston, MA 02130

Join us at the Arnold Arboretum as we come to the close of the Emerald Necklace Conservancy's Fog x FLO installation by artist Fujiko Nakaya. Returning from her successful opening performance here at the Arboretum, lyric soprano, Shinja Choi, will sing a selection of songs for the Arboretum's Fog x Hill. Shinja has performed operas and oratorios with orchestras in Korea, Japan, the United States, Germany, and more. She has won competitions in the United States, Austria, and Japan. Born in Seoul, Shinja has a Masters of Music from the Manhattan School of Music, and has taught voice at universities in South Korea. She currently lives in the Boston area and performs sacred music. Photo by Lawrence Mullings.

Free; bring a blanket, a low chair, a picnic. Dress accordingly for the weather.

Hosted by the Armold Arboretum of Harvard University as part of the Emerald Necklace Conservancy's Fog x FLO project

Oct
27
Sat
Performance, Reception

"Songs in the Fog" Performance by Shinja Choi and Reception

5:00PM to 7:00PM
Hunnewell Building Lawn, Arnold Arboretum, 125 Arborway Boston, MA 02130

Join us at the Arnold Arboretum as we come to the close of the Emerald Necklace Conservancy's Fog x FLO installation by artist Fujiko Nakaya. Returning from her successful opening performance here at the Arboretum, lyric soprano, Shinja Choi, will sing a selection of songs for the Arboretum's Fog x Hill. Shinja has performed operas and oratorios with orchestras in Korea, Japan, the United States, Germany, and more. She has won competitions in the United States, Austria, and Japan. Reception with the artist to follow the performance. Born in Seoul, Shinja has a Masters of Music from the Manhattan School of Music, and has taught voice at universities in South Korea. She currently lives in the Boston area and performs sacred music. 

Free; bring a blanket, a low chair, a picnic. Dress accordingly for the weather.

Hosted by the Armold Arboretum of Harvard University as part of the Emerald Necklace Conservancy's Fog x FLO project