Worldwide Week at Harvard 2019

6-12 October 2019

Worldwide Week at Harvard showcases the remarkable breadth of Harvard’s global engagement. During Worldwide Week, Harvard Schools, research centers, departments, and student organizations host academic and cultural events with global or international themes.

The Office of the Vice Provost for International Affairs thanks all who hosted and participated in Worldwide Week 2019!

Event host information and FAQ

Submit an event

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Event hosted on the Future of Cities for Worldwide Week 2017
Worldwide Week at Harvard logo
Macbeth theatrical production at Arnold Arboretum during Worldwide Week 2018

Worldwide Week Events

Friday 4th

Oct
4
Fri
Social, Information Session/Networking, Reception

Engaging the World : Harvard College International Opportunities Fair

1:00PM to 4:00PM
Cabot Science Library, Science Center; 1 Oxford Street Cambridge, MA

*Worldwide Week KICK OFF EVENT*

Join FAS Centers, programs and departments to learn about opportunities to travel, study and work abroad during J-term, spring break and summer. Talk with fellow students, gather information from campus-based offices and explore ways to elevate your time at Harvard through international experiences. Attendees are encouraged to join and participate in other events hosted across the University (information sessions, networking opportunities, and more!) throughout the rest of Worldwide Week. 

Hosted by FAS Office of International Affairs and Office of International Education.

Oct
4
Fri
Social, Exhibit

From the Atomic Bomb to the Nobel Peace Prize | Photo Exhibition

Oct 4, 4:00PM to Oct 8, 10:00PM
Wasserstein Campus Center (WCC) South Lobby, Harvard Law School; 1585 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge MA

This photo exhibition will look at the impact of nuclear weapons and recent progress toward their elimination from a humanitarian point of view. It will focus on the devastation caused by early use and testing of these weapons and civil society’s role in producing the 2017 treaty that bans them. The exhibition accompanies “A Survivor’s Story", an October 8 event featuring Setsuko Thurlow, who lived through the Hiroshima bombing and accepted the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons.

The exhibit is free and open to the public daily from Friday 4 - Tuesday 8 October, 8:00am - 10:00pm. 

Organized by the Armed Conflict and Civilian Protection Initiative, Hibakusha Stories/Youth Arts New York, and HLS Advocates for Human Rights.

Saturday 5th

Oct
5
Sat
Social, Exhibit

From the Atomic Bomb to the Nobel Peace Prize | Photo Exhibition

Oct 5, 8:00AM to Oct 8, 10:00PM
Wasserstein Campus Center (WCC) South Lobby, Harvard Law School; 1585 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge MA

This photo exhibition will look at the impact of nuclear weapons and recent progress toward their elimination from a humanitarian point of view. It will focus on the devastation caused by early use and testing of these weapons and civil society’s role in producing the 2017 treaty that bans them. The exhibition accompanies “A Survivor’s Story”, an October 8 event featuring Setsuko Thurlow, who lived through the Hiroshima bombing and accepted the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons.

Organized by the Armed Conflict and Civilian Protection Initiative, Hibakusha Stories/Youth Arts New York, and HLS Advocates for Human Rights. 

Sunday 6th

Oct
6
Sun
Social, Exhibit

From the Atomic Bomb to the Nobel Peace Prize | Photo Exhibition

8:00AM to 10:00PM
Wasserstein Campus Center (WCC) South Lobby, Harvard Law School; 1585 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge MA

This photo exhibition will look at the impact of nuclear weapons and recent progress toward their elimination from a humanitarian point of view. It will focus on the devastation caused by early use and testing of these weapons and civil society’s role in producing the 2017 treaty that bans them. The exhibition accompanies “A Survivor’s Story”, an October 8 event featuring Setsuko Thurlow, who lived through the Hiroshima bombing and accepted the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons.

Organized by the Armed Conflict and Civilian Protection Initiative, Hibakusha Stories/Youth Arts New York, and HLS Advocates for Human Rights. 

Monday 7th

Oct
7
Mon
Social, Exhibit

From the Atomic Bomb to the Nobel Peace Prize | Photo Exhibition

8:00AM to 10:00PM
Wasserstein Campus Center (WCC) South Lobby, Harvard Law School; 1585 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge MA

This photo exhibition will look at the impact of nuclear weapons and recent progress toward their elimination from a humanitarian point of view. It will focus on the devastation caused by early use and testing of these weapons and civil society’s role in producing the 2017 treaty that bans them. The exhibition accompanies “A Survivor’s Story”, an October 8 event featuring Setsuko Thurlow, who lived through the Hiroshima bombing and accepted the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons.

Organized by the Armed Conflict and Civilian Protection Initiative, Hibakusha Stories/Youth Arts New York, and HLS Advocates for Human Rights.

Oct
7
Mon
Lecture/Panel

15+ Years of PEPFAR: How US Action on HIV/AIDS Has Changed Global Health

9:00AM to 6:00PM
Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East, Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge

Join us for a one-day symposium to explore what enabled the President’s Emergency Plan For Aids Relief, a visionary program that has transformed not just the worldwide HIV/AIDS response but global health delivery more broadly. We will take a historically informed look at what it will take to stop global transmission of HIV, and share tools useful for others hoping to move the needle on vexing problems in global health. Speakers include Ambassador Deborah L. Birx, NIAID Director Anthony Fauci, Harvard University Professor Paul Farmer, and many others.

Register Here

This event is cosponsored by the Harvard Global Health Institute, the Harvard University Center for AIDS Research, the Center for Health Law Policy and Innovation at Harvard Law School, and the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School.

Oct
7
Mon
Lecture/Panel

Book Talk: Human Rights & Participatory Politics in Southeast Asia

12:00PM to 1:00PM
Wasserstein Hall, WCC 3016; 1585 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA USA

In this book, Dr. Catherine Renshaw recounts an extraordinary period of human rights institution-building in Southeast Asia. Dr. Catherine Renshaw is Deputy Head of the Thomas More Law School, based at the North Sydney campus. Her research focuses on international law, international human rights law, particularly in Southeast Asia, and regional systems for the promotion and protection of human rights. 

Lunch will be served. Co-sponsored by the Program on Law and Society in the Muslim World, HLS Advocates for Human Rights, and the Harvard Human Rights Journal.

Oct
7
Mon
Social, Performance, Other, Seminar

Music Programming AFRICA | WHRB 95.3

1:00PM to 3:00PM
streaming online and 95.3FM

From October 6-12, our Worldwide Week programming will showcase musicians, artists, and speakers from all around the world. In this week, you can look forward to live recordings, exclusive interviews, student performances, and more. Further details about this week's programming will be posted to our website.

Oct
7
Mon
Lecture/Panel, Performance, Reception

Bending the Arc: Film Screening and Panel Discussion

3:30PM to 6:00PM
Askwith Hall (inside Longfellow Hall), 13 Appian Way, Cambridge, MA 02138

Join us for a documentary film screening of Bending the Arc, the story of Partners in Health, followed by a discussion on global health equity, research, and resilience with Dr. Paul Farmer, Dr. Salmaan Keshavjee, and Dr. Mercedes Becerra from Harvard Medical School’s Department of Global Health & Social Medicine. After the 45-minute movie clip and panel discussion, enjoy light refreshments and an opportunity to connect with colleagues and celebrate Harvard’s international activities.

RSVP Requested! Learn more and register for the event.

Hosted by Harvard Global Support Services (GSS). 

Oct
7
Mon
Lecture/Panel

"The Atlantic Slave-Sugar Complex in the Genoese Cycle of Accumulation: Origins of the Capitalist World-Economy"

4:00PM to 6:00PM
Robinson Hall, Conference Room 125, 35 Quincy Street Cambridge, MA

Presenter: Dale Tomich, History and Sociology, Binghamton University

Faculty Commentator: Orlando Patterson, John Cowles Professor of Sociology, Harvard University.
Graduate Student Commentator: Marcelo Ferraro, WIGH Global Fellow; Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil

Hosted as part of the History of Global Capitalism seminar at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs. A precirculated paper is available by request to wigh@wcfia.harvard.edu

About the seminar: This graduate-faculty research seminar is designed to bring together interested faculty and students on a continuing basis to cover topics on global history. It is part of History 2950A/B, History of Global Capitalism, and includes both reading sessions designed for graduate students and research sessions open to the interested public during which students and faculty participants will present current research. Faculty participants will be drawn from a number of schools, and, most especially, from the group of fellows in global history who are spending the academic year 2019-2020 at the Weatherhead Initiative on Global History. Discussions will be moderated by Professors Sven Beckert and Sophus Reinert.

 

 

Oct
7
Mon
Lecture/Panel

Losing the Way in the City: Cities and Intellectual Crisis in Eleventh-Century China

4:00PM to 6:00PM
Common Room, 2 Divinity Avenue Camrbridge, MA

Literati of previous centuries had written the city in the past tense, in tales of dissolute youth and in memoirs about capitals destroyed, but had otherwise hidden urban streets behind a generic blur of dust and traffic. Literati in the eleventh century, in contrast, deemed the living streetscape a topic suitable for literary composition, and they changed the topography of literary genres in order to make a place for the city in writing. As a new literary subject, the urban streetscape afforded scope for original effects, but literati also wrote the city for ideological reasons...

Hosted by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, as part of its China Humanities Seminar. 

Oct
7
Mon
Lecture/Panel

Thinking with Technology from the History of Korea

4:15PM to 5:45PM
S250, Porté Seminar Room, 2nd Floor, CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge St., Cambridge

Speakers:
Professor Jung Lee, Ewha Womans University, “Tacit Politics of Practical Studies: The Exclusion of Rooted Practice in Late Chosŏn Studies of Papermaking”
Professor Hyungsub Choi, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, "'So Far, and Yet So Close’: South Korea, Japan, and the Challenges of Technological Self-Reliance”

Chair: 
Professor Victor Seow, Department of History of Science, Harvard University

Abstracts and speaker biographies available on Asia Center calendar listing. Co-hosted by Harvard University Asia Center and Korea Institute. 

Oct
7
Mon
Lecture/Panel

Challenges to Democracy in the European Union: An Address by Sergey Lagodinsky, Member of the European Parliament

4:30PM to 6:00PM
Adolphus Busch Hall, 27 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (entrance at Cabot Way)

Don’t miss the opportunity to hear from newly elected Member of the European Parliament and Harvard Kennedy School alumnus (2003) Sergey Lagodinsky. Learn from his insights and expertise on climate change, transatlantic relations as well as the law and politics of diversity and integration. Lagodinsky serves as Vice Chair of the Legal Affairs Committee of the European Parliament, which on September 25, 2019 took the unprecedented measure of rejecting two EU Commissioner-designates over concerns of conflict of interest.

Hosted by the Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies as part of its Guido Goldman Lecture on Germany. 

Oct
7
Mon
Social, Information Session/Networking

Student Info Session: January Programs in Latin America

4:30PM to 6:00PM
CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge Street, Room S216

Interested in spending January in Latin America? Come to the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies (DRCLAS) Info Session to learn how you can get involved in the region over casual refreshments. Gain internship experience, study, or participate in experiential learning through immersive programs offered this January.

Oct
7
Mon
Lecture/Panel

A Flawed Giant: Zhou Enlai and China's Prolonged Rise

6:00PM to 7:15PM
JFK Jr Forum, Littauer Building, Harvard Kennedy School, 79 John F. Kennedy St., Cambridge, MA

Join us for the S.T. Lee Lecture featuring Chen Jian, a leading scholar in modern Chinese history, the history of Chinese-American relations, and Cold War international history.

Speaker: Chen Jian, Distinguished Global Network Professor of History, NYU and NYU-Shanghai; Hu Shih Professor of History Emeritus, Cornell University.
Professor Chen is Distinguished Global Network Professor of History at NYU and NYU-Shanghai, Hu Shih Professor of History Emeritus and, from 2005 to 2015, inaugural holder of the Michael J. Zak Chair of History for US-China Relations, at Cornell University, and Global Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center. He is a leading scholar in modern Chinese history, history of Chinese-American relations, and Cold War international history. Among his many publications are China's Road to the Korean War, The China Challenge in the 21st Century: Implications for U.S. Foreign Policy, and Mao's China and the Cold War. He is now completing a major biography of Zhou Enlai. Hu Shih Professor of History Emeritus, Cornell University

Moderator: Fredrik Logevall, Laurence D. Belfer Professor of International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School; Professor of History in the Faculty of Arts & Sciences, Harvard University. 

Co-Sponsors: Ash Center for Democratic Governance & Innovation, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. This event is free and open to the public. 

Tuesday 8th

Oct
8
Tue
Social, Exhibit

From the Atomic Bomb to the Nobel Peace Prize | Photo Exhibition

8:00AM to 10:00PM
Wasserstein Campus Center (WCC) South Lobby, Harvard Law School; 1585 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge MA

This photo exhibition will look at the impact of nuclear weapons and recent progress toward their elimination from a humanitarian point of view. It will focus on the devastation caused by early use and testing of these weapons and civil society’s role in producing the 2017 treaty that bans them. The exhibition accompanies “A Survivor’s Story”, an October 8 event featuring Setsuko Thurlow, who lived through the Hiroshima bombing and accepted the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons.

Organized by the Armed Conflict and Civilian Protection Initiative, Hibakusha Stories/Youth Arts New York, and HLS Advocates for Human Rights. 

Oct
8
Tue
Lecture/Panel

A Survivor's Story: From the Atomic Bomb to the Nobel Peace Prize

12:00PM to 1:30PM
Wasserstein Hall WCC B015, 1585 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA USA

Setsuko Thurlow, a native of Hiroshima, will describe her journey from atomic bomb survivor to nuclear disarmament advocate. In 2017, she accepted the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), which had spearheaded efforts to achieve a treaty banning nuclear weapons. Food will be served at the event.

This event is accompanied by a photo exhibition, "From the Atomic Bomb to the Nobel Peace Prize", on display in the South Lobby of the HLS Wasserstein Campus Center. 

Introductory Remarks by Bonnie Docherty, Associate Director of Armed Conflict and Civilian Protection.

Organized by the Armed Conflict and Civilian Protection Initiative. Co-sponsored by the Human Rights Program and HLS Advocates for Human Rights.

Oct
8
Tue
Lecture/Panel

Building Bridges - Our Global Health Community at Work

12:00PM to 1:00PM
190 Longwood Avenue, Room: REB 109 Boston, MA 02115

This lecture by two members of HSDM faculty will focus on drawing a thread between noting the importance of providing global oral health education so that health professionals can understand the interconnections of oral health and health as manifested by research.

Speakers:
Brittany Seymour, DDS, MPH, Assistant Professor of Oral Health Policy and Epidemiology, Director, Global Health Discipline , HSDM

Mary Tavares, DMD, MPH, Program Director of the Advanced Graduate Education Program in Dental Public Health, HSDM, Senior Clinical Investigator, The Forsyth Institute

Hosted by the Harvard School of Dental Medicine.  

Oct
8
Tue
Lecture/Panel

Population Pressures: Migration, Repression, and Agrarian Reform in Latin America

12:00PM to 1:00PM
CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge Street, Room S250

The Tuesday Seminar Series is a bring your own brown bag lunch series. Please feel free to enjoy your lunch at the lecture, drinks will be provided.

Emily Sellars, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Yale University

Hosted by David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies

Oct
8
Tue
Lecture/Panel, Other

Voters, Candidates, and Gender Representation in Japan

12:30PM to 2:00PM
CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Bowie-Vernon Room (K262)

Daniel Smith, Associate Professor of Government, Harvard University;
Moderator: Susan Pharr, Edwin O. Reischauer Professor of Japanese Studies; Director, WCFIA Program on U.S.-Japan Relations, Harvard University.   

This seminar is part of the Program on U.S.-Japan Relations' Special Series on the Future of Democracy in Japan and Asia, supported by the Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership (CGP).

Co-sponsored by the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs Program on U.S.-Japan Relations, FAS Department of Government and the Women and Public Policy Program, Harvard Kennedy School. 

Oct
8
Tue
Lecture/Panel

Big Health Data: When Consent is Not Enough

1:00PM to 2:00PM
Kresge 502, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA-02115

In 2018, India launched the National Digital Health Mission to ready India’s health data ecosystem for the technologies of the future. Recognizing the urgent need for making health data portable, without comprising security and privacy, Satchit Balsari and Rahul Matthan discuss the implications of global and regional jurisprudence on generation, exchange, and application of health data in India. Is Consent enough? Does anyone own health data? How representative are health data in India? Who benefits? Who is harmed?

Speakers: 

Rahul Matthan, Partner, Trilegal;
Satchit Balsari, Assistant Professor, Global Health and Population

Hosted by Department of Global Health and Population and FXB Center for Health and Human Rights. 

Oct
8
Tue
Social, Performance, Other

Music Programming EUROPE | WHRB 95.3

1:00PM to 3:00PM
streaming online and 95.3FM

From October 6-12, our Worldwide Week programming will showcase musicians, artists, and speakers from all around the world. In this week, you can look forward to live recordings, exclusive interviews, student performances, and more. Further details about this week's programming will be posted to our website.

Oct
8
Tue
Lecture/Panel

Future of Cities: Water

3:30PM to 5:30PM
Askwith Lecture Hall, Longfellow Hall, Harvard Graduate School of Education; 13 Appian Way Cambridge, MA.

The future of cities is impacted by water in two main manifestations: too much water (notably flooding and sea rise) or not enough water (leading to drought, extreme heat, and increased fire risk). Mature cities in developed economies cope with these stressors one way, while fast growing cities in emerging economies have quite different tools to anticipate and deal with perils. For example, sea rise issues in Jakarta and Lagos are considered differently than in Miami or Amsterdam; drought and heat is experienced one way in Beijing or Mexico City than in Los Angeles, subject to terrifying wildfires.

All of these world cities, home to hundreds of millions of people, face water issues in the next decades. The world is seeing increasing migration as people move to cities for economic, political, or climate reasons. Will there also be necessary migration away from the coastal cities that, paradoxically, also provide so much economic opportunity? How will the research of Harvard scientists, the education of students, and the career and location choices of graduates be impacted? Join us to learn the foundational issues and to discuss the path forward.

Experts:
Loreta Castro Reguera Professor, UNAM Mexico; Design Director, Taller Capital, Mexico; Visiting Scholar in Landscape Architecture, Harvard Graduate School of Design
John Fernandez Professor, MIT; Director, MIT Environmental Solutions Initiative; Director, Urban Metabolism Group
Jim Matheson Founder and principal, Flybridge Ventures; Chairman and CEO, Oasys Water; Senior Lecturer in Entrepreneurship, Harvard Business School Joyce Coffee Founder and President, Climate Resilience Consulting
Efosa Ojomo Global Prosperity Lead, Clayton Christen Institute for Disruptive Innovation
John Macomber, Moderator Senior Lecturer in Finance, Harvard Business School; Faculty Chair, HBS Africa Research Center.

Hosted by HBS Global Initiative, Harvard Graduate School of Design, David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, and Office of the Vice Provost for International Affairs

Oct
8
Tue
Lecture/Panel

A Point-CounterPoint Discussion: Malaria Eradication Within a Generation?

3:45PM to 5:15PM
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Kresge, G-2

Malaria is one of the oldest and deadliest afflictions of humankind. The Lancet Commission on Malaria Eradication posits malaria eradication can be done by 2050 or sooner with specific measures in the areas of software, hardware, finance, and leadership/accountability. The report findings are in contrast to the recently released Executive Summary of the WHO’s Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Malaria Eradication, which did not call for an eradication goal or timeline.

Join us for a point-counterpoint discussion regarding the difference in these two malaria eradication strategies, specifically the pros and cons of setting a formal eradication goal and timeline.

Event Presenters:
Nicholas Arisco, PhD Candidate Population Health Sciences, Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences;

Esias Bedingar, SM Candidate Global Health & Population;

Richard Cash, PhD, Senior Lecturer on Global Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health;

Marcia Castro, PhD, Andelot Professor of Demography and Chair, Department of Global Health & Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. 

 

Hosted by Harvard's Defeating Malaria: From the Genes to the Globe Initiative and the Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. 

Oct
8
Tue
Lecture/Panel

Designing the South: Emerging Accounts of Technology, Entrepreneurship, and Collaboration between Africa and China

4:00PM to 6:00PM
Center for African Studies, 1280 Massachusetts Ave., 3rd Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138

From the height of the copy-cat manufacturing years to the current era of big tech represented by the likes of Alibaba, Huawei, Tencent, etc., Chinese technology has contributed to much of the ambivalence around the country’s perceived global ascendancy. Particularly in the global south where China’s economic activity favors infrastructure building, Chinese tech firms have come to represent both innovation and expediency, even as they are perceived as security threats and agents of neocolonial enterprise. In Africa, firms such as the Shenzhen based Transsion also exemplify what is best described as a tenacious pursuit of markets at the so-called bottom of the pyramid, showcasing what the south of China has come to be known for: agile design and manufacturing that offers a wide range of price and quality to suit different customers.

Event Presenter:
Seyram Avle, PhD (Assistant Professor, Department of Communication, University of Massachusetts, Amherst) 

Hosted by Harvard Center for African Studies, Harvard Asia Center, Harvard Fairbank Center, Harvard Yenching Institute

Oct
8
Tue
Lecture/Panel

Atlas of Innovation Districts: Cerdà in the XXI Century

4:30PM to 6:00PM
RCC Conference Room, 26 Trowbridge Street, Cambridge MA

Harvard Researcher and Aretian Co-Founder Jeremy Burke will present the first-ever Atlas of Innovation Districts, developed with fellow Researcher and Co-Founder Ramon Gras Alomà. The Atlas of Innovation Districts represents the first-of-its-kind systematic study of 50 notable Innovation Districts in the United States: their collective knowhow, specialization, innovation and economic impact, as well as the urban design and social characteristics of the social ecosystems that welcome and enhance them. The report identifies the key ingredients and dynamics behind the success of thriving innovation districts across the US territory.

Speaker: Jeremy Burke,  Urban Innovation Researcher at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences; Aretian Co-Founder.

Hosted by the Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard University. 

Oct
8
Tue
Lecture/Panel

Data Privacy 3.0: Are We Ready for AI in South Asia?

5:00PM to 6:30PM
CGIS South, S020, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

How can India take advantage of data to achieve its developmental objectives while balancing the need for personal privacy? The recently implemented Account Aggregator framework tries to establish a digital consent architecture to allow post-collection transfers of data. This will unlock a number of financial models to serve those who are not currently part of the formal banking systems. But at the same time, this can have a serious impact on personal privacy. A similar model is being attempted in the health system, and that too has similar repercussions. The speakers on this panel will delve into the interplay between data transfer and personal privacy in both the financial and healthcare systems.

Panelists:
Rahul Matthan, Partner, Trilegal, India;
I. Glenn Cohen, James A. Attwood and Leslie Williams Professor of Law, Harvard Law School; Director, Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School;
Tarun Khanna, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School; Director, the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute. 

Hosted by The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute

 

Oct
8
Tue
Lecture/Panel

Ten years of health-care reform in China – Progress and gaps in Universal Health Coverage

6:00PM to 8:00PM
Kresge Building, Room G3; 677 Huntington Avenue Boston MA 02115

In 2009, China launched a major health-care reform and pledged to provide all citizens with equal access to basic health care with reasonable quality and financial risk protection. The Government quadrupled its funding for health, expanded social insurance for all, and encouraged local governments to conduct pilots to reform their health delivery system. Professor Yip’s team has shown that China has made substantial progress in improving equal access to care and enhancing financial protection, especially for people of lower socioeconomic status. However, gaps remain in quality of care, control of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), efficiency in delivery, control of health expenditures, and public satisfaction. Professor Yip will be joined by a panel of speakers who will comment on future prospects for China’s health care system and will engage with the audience on lessons to be drawn for other countries aspiring to achieve universal health coverage.

Featuring introductory presentation by Professor Winnie Yip, Professor of the Practice of International Health Policy and Economics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, followed by panel discussion. 

Discussants: 

Barry Bloom, Joan L. and Julius H. Jacobson Research Professor of Public Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. 
William Hsiao, K.T. Li Research Professor of Economics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. 
Hong Wang, Senior Program Office, Gates Foundation. 

RSVP requested. Dinner will be served at the event. If you are not able to participant in person, live streaming of the event is available @ https://hsph.me/eminarct8livewebcastlink.

Hosted by Harvard China Health Partnership, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. 

 

Oct
8
Tue
Lecture/Panel, Other

Fall 2019 Matos Lecture: El Códice Florentino y la creación del Nuevo Mundo

8:00PM to 10:00PM
Auditorio Jaime Torres Bodet, Museo Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Av. Paseo de la Reforma s/n, Polanco Ciudad de México

*International Event* in Mexico City

Speaker: Diana Magaloni, Deputy Director, Los Angeles County Museum of Art

Diana Magaloni will present El Códice Florentino y la Creación del Nuevo Mundo (The Florentine Codex and the Creation of the New World) Tuesday, October 8th, at 7 p.m. local time (8 p.m. EST) at the Jaime Torres Bodet Auditorium at Mexico’s Museo Nacional de Antropología in Mexico City. The event is free and open to the public and will be live-streamed for those unable to attend in person.

Diana Magaloni is a renowned art historian, author, curator, and conservator. She holds a PhD in Art History from Yale University, an MA in Art History from the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), and a BA in Conservation from the Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia (INAH). She was formerly the Director of the Museo Nacional de Antropología in Mexico City (2009-13) and has served as researcher and professor at the Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas at UNAM since 1991. Her research has focused on developing methodologies to understand the originality of the artistic and aesthetic processes of ancient indigenous cultures in the Americas. She has published extensively, including the books Colors of the New World: Materials, Artists, and the Creation of the Florentine Codex (2014) and Albores de la Conquista (2017), which won the INAH’s Antonio García Cubas award for outstanding publications in anthropology and history. She has curated numerous exhibitions, including Picasso & Rivera: Conversations Across Time (LACMA and Museo del Palacio de Bellas Artes, 2017), which received the 2018 Award for Excellence from the Association of Art Museum Curators.

Presented by the Harvard University David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies in collaboration with Harvard Divinity School and the Moses Mesoamerican Archive.

Wednesday 9th

Oct
9
Wed
Lecture/Panel

Occupying Schools, Occupying Land: How the Landless Workers Movement Transformed Brazilian Education

12:00PM to 2:00PM
CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge Street, Room S050

Rebecca Tarlau will present on her recently published book, Occupying Schools, Occupying Land (2019 Oxford University Press), which explores how activists from the Brazilian Landless Workers Movement (MST) have pressured municipalities, states, and the federal government to implement pedagogical practices fostering activism, direct democracy, and collective forms of work in public schools and universities, affecting hundreds of thousands of students.

Event presenter: Rebecca Tarlau, Assistant Professor of Education and of Labor and Employment Relations, Pennsylvania State University.

Oct
9
Wed
Lecture/Panel

John Holden - Critical Issues Confronting China Series

12:30PM to 1:30PM
CGIS South S020, Belfer Case Study Room; 1730 Cambridge Street Cambridge MA USA

Holden’s China career spans more than four decades, twenty-eight years of which he spent on the ground in Beijing, Hong Kong, and Taipei.  He most recently served as President and CEO of the US-China Strong Foundation after a decade in Beijing as Managing Director and Senior Counselor for Hill+Knowlton Strategies; Founding Chairman of Shaklee (China) Ltd.; Associate Dean at Peking University’s Yenching Academy and Professor of Practice at its Guanghua School of Management. While at Peking University, Holden received the Friendship Award, the most prestigious honor granted by China to foreigners.

Hosted by Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies as part of its Critical Issues Confronting China Series. 

Oct
9
Wed
Social, Performance, Other

Music Programming AUSTRALIA | WHRB 95.3

1:00PM to 3:00PM
streaming online and 95.3FM

From October 6-12, our Worldwide Week programming will showcase musicians, artists, and speakers from all around the world. In this week, you can look forward to live recordings, exclusive interviews, student performances, and more. Further details about this week's programming will be posted to our website.

Oct
9
Wed
Lecture/Panel

Women in the Global Health Workforce

2:00PM to 3:30PM
Kresge G3 Auditorium 677 Huntington AveBoston, MA 02115

Four courageous female leaders. Four unique career trajectories. Four ways to make a difference in global health. Join us for a panel discussion featuring the 2019 Jane Jie Sun Women in Global Health LEAD Fellows.

Speakers: 

Sai Subhasree Raghavan, PhD | India

Stela Bivol, MD MPH | Moldova

Shabnum Sarfraz, MBBS MBA | Pakistan

Maureen Luba, B.S. | Malawi

 

Hosted by The Harvard Global Health Institute and Women in Health Initiative

Oct
9
Wed
Lecture/Panel, Social, Information Session/Networking, Reception

Climate Change, the Environment and Oral Health

4:00PM to 6:30PM
Harvard School of Dental Medicine, REB Auditorium & Lobby, 190 Longwood Avenue Boston, MA 02115

The panel will showcase some of HSDM’s work around the globe. We will convene our faculty to share their research in the "one health" concept and how the environment, veterinary medicine and craniofacial disease are linked; how the environment is impacting pediatric health globally; and how dental care and disease management are impacting the environment and climate.

Event Presenters:
Donna Hackley, DMD, MA, Instructor, Oral Health Policy & Epidemiology, Harvard School of Dental Medicine;
Philip J. Landrigan, MD, Professor, Biology, Director, Global Public Health Program and Global Pollution Observatory, Boston College;
Bjorn Olsen, MD, PhD, Professor, Developmental Biology, Hersey Professor of Cell Biology, Harvard School of Dental Medicine;
Renee Salas, MD (Moderator), Instructor in Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital   

Harvard School of Dental Medicine Office of Global and Community Health

Oct
9
Wed
Social, Information Session/Networking, Reception

Harvard International Community Meet-and-Greet!

4:00PM to 6:00PM
Winthrop Junior Common Room - 32 Mill Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

The Woodbridge International Society is proud to be part of World Wide Week to help connect the wider Harvard international community! Whether you are a current student, an alumnus, faculty, or with any other affiliation to any of the Harvard schools, join us at the Winthrop Junior Common Room from 4-6 PM on October 9 for a meet-and-greet with the international community. Come make new friends, reminisce with old ones and connect with members of the international community you might never meet otherwise.

Pastries and non-alcoholic beverages will be provided!

Hosted by Woodbridge International Society

Oct
9
Wed
Lecture/Panel

Book Talk: From Kargil to the Coup: Events that Shook Pakistan

4:15PM to 6:00PM
S250, Porté Seminar Room, 2nd Floor, CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge St., Cambridge

Nasim Zehra, Author; Columnist; Analyst for Channel 24, Islamabad, Pakistan will discuss her book "From Kargil to the Coup: Events that Shook Pakistan."

Chair: Sugata Bose, Gardiner Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs, Harvard University. 

Hosted by the Harvard University Asia Center. 

Oct
9
Wed
Lecture/Panel

Harvard Worldwide Week: RCC Postdoctoral Researchers Showcase

5:30PM to 7:00PM
RCC at Harvard, 26 Trowbridge Street, Cambridge MA 02138

RCC postdoctoral fellows at Harvard University will give short scientific and pedagogic talks about their research topics at Harvard University or their home Universities. These multidisciplinary, 10 minutes-long talks will be adapted for a general audience and will be followed by fruitful discussion. The goals are to disseminate knowledge, highlight the work of international scholars from Spain doing work at Harvard University as well as the generation and consolidation of new connections between members of the Harvard community and international visitors who have interest in the RCC community.

Event Presenters:
Alba Carrillo Vega, Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital; 
Diego Chapinal, Postdoctoral Researcher at Department of the Classics at Harvard University; 
Eva Gil González, Postdoctoral Fellow at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences; 
Maria Luisa Gil, Postdoctoral Researcher at Massachusetts General Hospital (Harvard Medical School);
Briseida Sofia Jiménez, Visiting Researcher at the Institute of Global Law & Policy at Harvard Law School;
Irene Lebrusán, Postdoctoral Researcher at Institute for Global Law and Policy at Harvard Law School;
Alejandro Llanos Garrido, Postdoctoral Researcher at Bioinformatics for the FAS Informatics Group at Harvard University;
Marta Pérez, Postdoctoral fellow at the MassGeneral Institute of Neurodegenerative Disease (MIND) and affiliate of Harvard Medical School;
Alfonso Sánchez Moya, Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Department of Government (FAS), Harvard University.

Hosted by Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard (RCC). 

Oct
9
Wed
Social, Information Session/Networking, Reception

All-Harvard Africa Mixer

6:00PM to 8:00PM
CGIS South Concourse - 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

The Harvard Center for African Studies invites you to join us for our annual All-Harvard Africa Mixer with African Food and Music! Learn about Africa-related activities and events planned for the Fall semester from students, faculty affiliates, and guests from across the university.

Oct
9
Wed
Lecture/Panel

ERRE: A conversation with Mexican artist Marcos Ramírez

6:30PM to 8:00PM
Senior Common Room (Standish Hall), Winthrop House

Artist Marcos Ramírez (ERRE) in conversation with Professor Doris Sommer, Ira and Jewell Williams Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures and of African and African American Studies and José Falconi (Lecturer in Fine Arts, Brandeis University)

Marcos Ramírez, known as ERRE, was born in Tijuana in 1961. He studied at the Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, graduating with a law degree, and later worked in the construction industry for many years to support his visual art practice. He has been the subject of a number of solo exhibitions at institutions including the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, CA (2016), Museum of Latin American Art, Long Beach, CA (2014), MACLA/Movimiento de Arte y Cultura Latino Americana, San Jose, CA (2012), Museo de Arte Carrillo Gil, Mexico City (2010), and Centro Cultural Tijuana, Mexico (1996).

Hosted by David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies. Presented in collaboration with the Cultural Agents, the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, and the Committee on Immigration at Harvard

 

Oct
9
Wed
Performance

International Comedy Night with Cristela Alonzo

7:00PM to 9:00PM
Smith Campus Center, 1350 Massachusetts Avenue, Harvard Commons, 1st Floor

Get a fresh new perspective on the world. Join us for a dose of international-themed humor with Netflix comedian Cristela Alonzo and the Harvard College Stand-Up Comic Society.

About Cristela Alonzo Described as a “comedian and truth-teller,” Cristela Alonzo made history in 2014 when she became the first Latina to create, produce, and star in her own network sitcom Cristela for ABC. During that same year, she split her time between LA and NYC to serve as one of ABC’s favorite guest hosts on their hit daytime talk show, The View. In 2017, Cristela made history again when she became the first Latina lead in a Disney Pixar film when she voiced the part of Cruz Ramirez in Cars 3. Her first stand-up special, Lower Classy, is currently streaming on Netflix. Cristela’s memoir, Music to My Years, will be released on October 8, 2019, by Atria Books, an imprint of Simon & Schuster. Cristela grew up in challenging circumstances, in an undocumented family at the Texas border. Her hilarious stories unmask the realities and absurdities of being an immigrant kid, and grown-up, in America. Read more about Cristela at http://cristelaalonzo.com.

About the Harvard College Stand-Up Comic Society Founded in 2007, the Harvard College Stand-Up Comic Society (“Harvard College SUCS”) has been entertaining audiences in Sanders Theatre, Queens Head Pub, the Science Center, Fong Auditorium, the Gotham Comedy Club, and one random Rotary Club ever since. During their time with the Society, members have been seen at Improv Boston, the Comedy Studio, the Laugh Factory, and Last Comic Standing, and alumni have gone on to appear on Late Night, America's Got Talent, Last Comic Standing, the Boston Comedy Festival, and many other festivals and showcases. They've also been called a "ragtag band of misfits" by Cosmopolitan magazine.

No tickets are required. This event is FREE and open to the public—at the newly renovated Smith Campus Center in the heart of Harvard Square. 

Hosted by the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs. 

Thursday 10th

Oct
10
Thu
Social, Information Session/Networking

Info Session: Culture Lab Innovation Fund

12:00PM to 1:30PM
Cabot Science Library, Science Center; 1 Oxford Street Cambridge MA

The Culture Lab Innovation Fund awards grants to Harvard students, staff, faculty, postdoctoral researchers, and academic personnel to pursue ideas that seek to strengthen Harvard’s capacity to advance a culture of belonging. Proposals should aim to focus on having a direct connection to the Harvard community and influence the University's trajectory towards sustainable inclusive excellence guided by the framework recommended by the Presidential Task Force on Inclusion and Belonging. Members of the Harvard community are invited to an information session to learn how you can win a grant of up to $15,000 or more for your idea.

The priority theme for the 2019-2020 funding cycle of the Culture Lab Innovation Fund is “Advancing Diversity, Inclusion, and Belonging through Technology Driven Solutions." These are innovative ideas that leverage technology and data to address challenges around diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging at Harvard.

An additional info session will be hosted at the Longwood Campus on Thursday, Oct. 17 at the Modell Center, 10:30am - Noon.

Hosted by the Harvard University Office for Diversity, Inclusion and Belonging. 

Oct
10
Thu
Social, Performance, Other, Seminar

Music Programming ASIA | WHRB 95.3

1:00PM to 3:00PM
streaming online and 95.3FM

From October 6-12, our Worldwide Week programming will showcase musicians, artists, and speakers from all around the world. In this week, you can look forward to live recordings, exclusive interviews, student performances, and more. Further details about this week's programming will be posted to our website.

Oct
10
Thu
Lecture/Panel

Re-Drawing the Rules of the Game? Iran, Israel, and the Geopolitics of the Levant

2:30PM to 4:00PM
Cgis Knafel, K262, 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA 02138

The 2006 war between Israel and Lebanon forged a new political dynamic in the Middle East. Israel and Hezbollah established unofficial rules of engagement that secured peace through the logic of deterrence. These rules are now under question as decision-makers grapple with new regional dynamics and we are witness to military escalation across the Levant and the Middle East. Join us for a round table conversation for what these dynamics portend for Iran, Israel, and the region with Daniel Sobelman, Assistant Professor at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and Hussein Kalout, Associate Research Scholar at the Center of Middle Eastern Studies, Harvard University. Moderated by Dr. Payam Mohseni, Director of the Project on Shi'ism and Global Affairs. 

Hosted by the Project on Shi'ism and Global Affairs at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs. 

Oct
10
Thu
Lecture/Panel, Social

Molinillos and Chocolate in Contemporary Mexico

3:00PM to 4:30PM
Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA

In this special event, Juan Alonso Rodriguez will explain how to make a molinillo, the whisk-like wooden tool that is traditionally used in Mexico to make froth in chocolate beverages. Together with Ana Rita García-Lascuráin, he will discuss the history of chocolate production in Mexico and its current renaissance. Using molinillos, members of the Cambridge-based Fine Cacao and Chocolate Institute will make three different chocolate beverages that participants can taste during the program. Advance registration required. Participants must be 18+. $8 members/$10 nonmembers

Presented by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology in collaboration with the Fine Cacao and Chocolate Institute, the Mexican Consulate General in Boston, Fundación MUCHO Mexico City, and MassMex, as part of the 2019 New England Chocolate Festival, Harvard Museums of Science & Culture

Oct
10
Thu
Lecture/Panel, Performance, Reception

2nd Annual Destination: World Powered by PechaKucha

4:15PM to 6:30PM
Tsai Auditorium, CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street

From Hong Kong to Cape Town, come learn how international experiences shape the lives of Harvard undergraduates. Nine students take to the stage to share their inspirational stories about global engagement, intellectual exploration and personal discovery made possible through experiences abroad. The event will be followed by an international food buffet and a chance for students to learn more about crafting their own international experiences while at Harvard.  

Co-sponsored by Harvard's Asia Center, Center for African Studies, Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, Edwin O. Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard China Fund, John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Korea Institute, Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies, Office of FAS International Affairs, Office of the Vice Provost for International Affairs, Office of International Education, Program on US-Japan Relations, and Weatherhead Center for International Affairs.

Oct
10
Thu
Lecture/Panel

Italy in Europe: Economic Problems and Political Prospects

4:30PM to 6:00PM
Adolphus Busch Hall, 27 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (entrance at Cabot Way)

Carlo Bastasin will address the Italian economy and the resurgence of populism and nationalism in Europe while Philippe Le Corre will serve as discussant focusing on China's investment strategy in Italy and Southern Europe. Vivien Schmidt will chair the discussion.

Hosted by the Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies as part of its European Union Seminar

Oct
10
Thu
Performance, Other

Adiós America Poetry Performance & Writing Workshop

5:30PM to 7:00PM
Harvard Chan School of a Public Health, Kresge G3, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115

For Hispanic Heritage Month, we invite you to the Adiós America Performance & Writing Workshop, led by National Poetry Slam Finalists and poets Angélica Maria and Melania-Luisa Marte. RSVP for dinner headcount. This workshop focuses on reconstructing our stories, cultures and identities, allowing us to strip away the barriers that prevent us from speaking and writing from our most grounded lens. Attendees will learn to reclaim the power of their names. 

Open to all Harvard students, post-docs, staff, and faculty with dinner provided. RSVP required for dinner head count.

Harvard Chan Office of Diversity & Inclusion (ODI),
Latinx Students in Public Health Association (LSPHA), and Harvard Dominican
Student Association (DSA), Black Student Health Organization (BSHO)

Oct
10
Thu
Lecture/Panel

Caracterización lingüística y sociolingüística del español de Venezuela

5:30PM to 7:00PM
2 Arrow Street 4th Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138

Este panel presentará un panorama de la diversidad lingüística y sociolingüística del español de Venezuela, ilustrada a partir de la fonología, la gramática y las características discursivas: las actitudes hacia las variantes vernáculas de una variable sociolingüística, a menudo asociadas con atributos como la inteligencia, preparación profesional, simpatía y atractivo, o con determinados niveles socioeconómicos; rasgos dialectales gramáticales del español venezolano en comparación con otras variedades; y desarrollo del discurso narrativo en niños de edad escolar de niveles socioeconómicos bajos y altos, con las implicaciones pedagógicas derivadas de las diferentes habilidades orales que presentan los niños al comienzo de su escolaridad formal.
Martha Shiro, profesora titular de la Universidad Central de Venezuela, es experta en el desarrollo del lenguaje oral y escrito, bilingüismo, y discurso narrativo y argumentativo de niños y adultos.
Irania Malaver, profesora titular de la Universidad Central de Venezuela, es antropóloga y experta en lingüística de corpus, dialectología y sociolingüística.
Manuel Díaz‐Campos, profesor catedrático de lingüística hispánica en la Universidad de Indiana, se especializa en las áreas de sociolingüística, variación fonológica y morfosintáctica.

This panel discussion will present an overview of the linguistic and sociolinguistic diversity of Venezuelan Spanish, exemplified by phonological, grammatical, and discursive characteristics: the attitudes towards vernacular sociolinguistic variables, often associated with attributes like intelligence, professionalism, charm, and personal appeal, or with a certain socioeconomic status; certain dialectal Venezuelan grammar features, compared to other dialectal varieties; the development of narrative discourse in Venezuelan school-aged children from upper and lower socioeconomic backgrounds, and the educational implications of the differing oral abilities children show at the start of their formal education.
Martha Shiro, professor at Universidad Central de Venezuela, is an expert in the development of oral and written language, bilingualism, and narrative and argumentative discourse in children and adults.
Irania Malaver, anthropologist and professor at Universidad Central de Venezuela, is an expert in corpus linguistics, dialectology and sociolinguistics.
Manuel Díaz‐Campos, full professor of Hispanic linguistics at University of Indiana, is an expert in sociolinguistics, phonological and morphosyntactic variation.

RSVP requested online or by email to info-observatory@fas.harvard.edu. Hosted by Instituto Cervantes at Harvard. 

Oct
10
Thu
Reception, Social

Harvard Chan CultureFest

5:30PM to 7:00PM
Kresge Cafeteria, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue Boston MA 02115

The Office for Student Affairs at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health invites you to participate in our annual CultureFest event on Thursday October 10th from 5:30-7:00 PM. Celebrate our diverse community with cultural snacks, music, activities, and more! All Harvard affiliates are welcome to attend this fun, social, and community-centered event. Contact studentaffairs@hsph.harvard.edu with any questions. 

Hosted by Harvard T.H. Chan Office for Student Affairs. 

 

Oct
10
Thu
Lecture/Panel

Plants Go to War: A Botanical History of World War II

6:30PM to 8:00PM
Arnold Arboretum, Hunnewell Building, 125 Arborway, Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

As the first botanical history of World War II, Plants Go to War examines military history from the perspective of plant science. From victory gardens to drugs, timber, rubber, and fibers, plants supplied materials with key roles in victory. Author and botanist Judith Sumner will speak of the many plants that were incorporated into wartime safety materials, diet and rations, and even bombers. Free admission, registration requested.

Hosted by The Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University.

Oct
10
Thu
Social

Harvard Spanish Undergraduate Association Fall 2019 Welcome

7:00PM to 9:00PM
RCC Conference Room, 26 Trowbridge St. Cambridge MA 02138

The Harvard Spanish Undergraduate Association wishes to invite all Spanish undergraduates and RCC Undergraduate Fellows to an afternoon at the RCC and for an opportunity to get to know and become a member of our Association and to learn about the Spanish Higher Education System.

The Harvard Spanish Undergraduate Association is a Harvard Club committed to fostering a community where Spanish students can support each other in their transition into the US in general and into Harvard in particular. We strive to continue to partake in Spanish culture as well as being the ambassadors for Spain at Harvard. As the academic year and the club itself progresses, we will also attempt to bring successful Spanish individuals (businessmen, athletes, politicians...) to Harvard to help spread awareness on the Spanish culture as well as the knowledge imparted by these speakers.

Hosted by Real Collegio Complutense at Harvard University and Harvard Spanish Undergraduate Association. 

Friday 11th

Oct
11
Fri
Exhibit

Art Exhibit - Remember Yugoslavia? Photographs by Martin Karplus

10:00AM to 4:00PM
Adolphus Busch Hall, 27 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (entrance at Cabot Way)

The exhibition displays a selection of photographs, taken by Martin Karplus, Theodore William Richards Professor of Chemistry Emeritus at Harvard and Nobel Laureate, during his travels in the former Yugoslavia in 1955. 
The exhibition features photographs taken by Martin Karplus during his travels in Europe in 1955. The images are the testimony of a personal journey into cultures, customs and landscapes near and far in time and place. They show the inquiring mind and profoundly humanistic vision of the photographer. They were taken during a point in Yugoslavia’s history when “the Balkans turned into a laboratory for the competition between the Free World and Soviet communism to lead traditional agrarian societies toward modernity,” as Mark Mazower observed in his book The Balkans: A Short History.

Exhibit will be on display through 13 January 2020. Hosted by the Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies. 

Oct
11
Fri
Social, Performance, Other, Seminar

Music Programming SOUTH AMERICA | WHRB 95.3

1:00PM to 3:00PM
streaming online and 95.3FM

From October 6-12, our Worldwide Week programming will showcase musicians, artists, and speakers from all around the world. In this week, you can look forward to live recordings, exclusive interviews, student performances, and more. Further details about this week's programming will be posted to our website.

Oct
11
Fri
Lecture/Panel

By Force of Power: Social-Science Knowledge, Political Power, and the Economics Profession in Communist-Era Hungary

2:00PM to 3:30PM
CGIS South Building, Room S153 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA, 02138

The seminar will discuss how expertise in the social sciences was affected by political power during the Cold War, using the specific case of Hungary.

Oct
11
Fri
Lecture/Panel

Troubling Times for Gender Equality Politics: German and European Experiences

2:00PM to 5:00PM
Adolphus Busch Hall, 27 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (entrance at Cabot Way)

The workshop will feature two panels with well-known, prominent and junior scholars on gender equality politics in Germany and Europe, to discuss contemporary challenges in gender politics, especially with the politicization of immigration, as well as with the rise of populist right parties. In unsettled times, gender relations become a favorite target for social repression, but the openings created by changing political alignments are also opportunities for women politicians and for feminist and gender-queer mobilizations. Thus, the workshop will draw attention to the changes in women’s status that have occurred and are sometimes seen as precipitating “backlash.”

The workshop will examine narratives of progress as well as of reaction, and the opportunities opening for social movements as once secure political parties falter. It will focus on gender equity politics, LGBTQ+I issues, motherhood, and gender studies in Germany and draw connections to developments across Europe and offer comparisons to experiences in the United States. It will try to account for the specificities of German history, parties and policies, in the context of challenges that are coursing throughout Europe and sometimes echoed in developments in the US. 

Panel 1: Family, Gender Binaries, and Knowledge Production

Chair and Discussant: Mary Brinton, Harvard University

Caitlyn Collins, Washington University in St. Louis: Making Motherhood Work: How Women Manage Careers and Care-giving

Angelika von den Wahl, Lafayette University: From Object to Subject: Intersex Activism and the Rise and Fall of the Gender Binary in Germany

Kathrin Zippel, Northeastern University: Gender Studies under Attack

 

Panel 2: Gender Politics Inside and Outside of the Right

Chair and Discussant: Laura Frader, Northeastern University

Louise Davidson-Schmidt, University of Miami: German Gender Politics in the Age of the AfD

Sarah Wiliarty, Wesleyan University: Gender Politics in German Conservative Parties

Myra Marx Ferree, University of Wisconsin-Madison: Demography and Democracy: Masculinity Threat and the Politics of Reproduction

 

Hosted by Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies 50th Anniversary Event Series and its Seminar on Social Exclusion and Inclusion, and the American Friends of Alexander Humboldt Foundation. 

Oct
11
Fri
Lecture/Panel

The Fragility of Connection: Roads, State, and Religion in Ancient Japan

4:30PM to 6:00PM
Porte Room (S250), 2nd level, CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge St., Cambridge, MA

Event Presenters:
Speaker: Bryan D. Lowe, Assistant Professor of Religion, Princeton University
Moderator: Ryuichi Abe, Reischauer Institute Professor of Japanese Religions,
Harvard University

Hosted by Edwin O. Reischauer Japan Forum Lecture Series, co-sponsored by the Harvard Buddhist Studies Forum

Oct
11
Fri
Lecture/Panel, Information Session/Networking

Life, Work and Legacy of Spanish Nobel Prize Winners

5:00PM to 6:30PM
RCC Conference Room, 26 Trowbridge Street, Cambridge MA

Spain has given birth to many notable scientists and writers, including some of the most relevant Nobel laureates in history. On this session, expert Harvard postdoctoral fellows will present brief talks summarizing the life and achievements of every Spanish Nobel prize winner, followed by a round of questions and a discussion. Come and join us to learn and discuss the life, work and legacy of these remarkable Spanish Nobel laureates.

1904 José Echegaray Literature
1906 Santiago Ramón y Cajal Medicine
1922 Jacinto Benavente Literature
1956 Juan Ramón Jiménez Literature
1959 Severo Ochoa Medicine
1977 Vicente Aleixandre Literature
1989 Camilo José Cela Literature

Speakers:
Pilar Baldominos Flores, PhD Student in Dana-Farber Cancer Institute;  
Alba Carrillo Vega, Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital;
Diego Chapinal, Postdoctoral Researcher at Department of the Classics at Harvard University;
Irene Lebrusán, Postdoctoral Researcher at Institute for Global Law and Policy at Harvard Law School;
Manuel J. Martínez López, Ph.D. Candidate in law at the Complutense University of Madrid;
Marta Pérez, Postdoctoral fellow at the MassGeneral Institute of Neurodegenerative Disease (MIND) and affiliate of Harvard Medical School;
Alfonso Sánchez Moya, Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Department of Government (FAS), Harvard University.

Hosted by Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard University. 

Oct
11
Fri
Lecture/Panel

Paradoxes of Green: Color, Space and Environmental Movement

5:30PM to 7:30PM
Immeuble Slim, Rue de l’Euro, Les jardins du Lac II, Tunis

*INTERNATIONAL EVENT* Hosted in Tunis, Tunisia by Center for Middle Eastern Studies Tunisia Office. 

Speaker:
Gareth Doherty, Director of the Master in Landscape Architecture Program, Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture at Harvard University's Graduate School of Design. 

Based on long-term ethnographic fieldwork, Gareth Doherty explores the landscapes of Bahrain, where green represents a plethora of implicit human values and exists in dialectical tension with other culturally and environmentally significant colors and hues. Explicit in his book is the argument that concepts of color and object are mutually defining and thus a discussion about green becomes a discussion about the creation of space and place. Gareth Doherty’s innovative multidisciplinary study considers the concept of green from multiple perspectives—aesthetic, architectural, environmental, political, and social—in the Kingdom of Bahrain, where green has a long and deep history of appearing cooling, productive, and prosperous—a radical contrast to the hot and hostile desert. Although green is often celebrated in cities as a counter to gray urban environments, green has not always been good for cities. Similarly, manifestation of the color green in arid urban environments is often in direct conflict with the practice of green from an environmental point of view. This paradox is at the heart of the book. In arid environments such as Bahrain, the contradiction becomes extreme and even unsustainable.

Admission is free to all who attend. Hosted by Harvard University Center of Middle Eastern Studies as part of its CMES Tunisia Lectures Series 2019. 

Saturday 12th

Oct
12
Sat
Social, Performance, Other

Music Programming NORTH AMERICA | WHRB 95.3

4:00PM to 6:00PM
streaming online and 95.3FM

From October 6-12, our Worldwide Week programming will showcase musicians, artists, and speakers from all around the world. In this week, you can look forward to live recordings, exclusive interviews, student performances, and more. Further details about this week's programming will be posted to our website.

Oct
12
Sat
Social, Performance

Raunak: An Adventure of a Lifetime

7:00PM to 9:00PM
Lowell Lecture Hall, 17 Kirkland Street Cambridge, MA 02138

Harvard Raftaar and Harvard Bhangra present Raunak 2019! Join a celebration of South Asian dance and culture at Harvard as we welcome dance teams from Harvard and other colleges on the East Coast to the largest intercollegiate dance showcase in the Northeast, Raunak! Tickets are $10 pre-sale and $12 at the door, purchase available online. Tickets are SEF eligible. Proceeds from ticket sales will be going to Ekal Vidyalaya, a movement to support youth education in rural and tribal India and Nepal.

There will be a FREE after party at 10pm in Cambridge Queen's Head for Harvard students (HUID required) and all performers.

The show is brought to you by the Harvard Office for the Arts and the Harvard Undergraduate Council.

The Office of the Vice Provost for International Affairs is currently accepting event proposals and suggestions for the Fall 2019 program. Please contact Bailey Payne to begin a conversation about hosting an event or for more information.

Event host information and FAQ

Submit an event

Request funding

Archive of events from Worldwide Week 2018

Archive of events from the 2017 inaugural Worldwide Week