Worldwide Week at Harvard 2019

6-12 October 2019

Worldwide Week at Harvard showcases the remarkable breadth of Harvard’s global engagement. During Worldwide Week, Harvard Schools, research centers, departments, and student organizations host academic and cultural events with global or international themes.

The Office of the Vice Provost for International Affairs is currently accepting event proposals and suggestions for the Fall 2019 program. Please contact Bailey Payne to begin a conversation about hosting an event or for more information.

Event host information and FAQ

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Event hosted on the Future of Cities for Worldwide Week 2017
Worldwide Week at Harvard logo
Macbeth theatrical production at Arnold Arboretum during Worldwide Week 2018

Worldwide Week Events

Friday 4th

Oct
4
Fri
Social, Information Session/Networking, Reception

Engaging the World : Harvard College International Opportunities Fair

1:00PM to 4:00PM
Cabot Science Library, Science Center; 1 Oxford Street Cambridge, MA

*Worldwide Week KICK OFF EVENT*

Join FAS Centers, programs and departments to learn about opportunities to travel, study and work abroad during J-term, spring break and summer. Talk with fellow students, gather information from campus-based offices and explore ways to elevate your time at Harvard through international experiences. Attendees are encouraged to join and participate in other events hosted across the University (information sessions, networking opportunities, and more!) throughout the rest of Worldwide Week. 

Hosted by FAS Office of International Affairs and Office of International Education.

Oct
4
Fri
Social, Exhibit

From the Atomic Bomb to the Nobel Peace Prize | Photo Exhibition

Oct 4, 4:00PM to Oct 8, 10:00PM
Wasserstein Campus Center (WCC) South Lobby, Harvard Law School; 1585 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge MA

This photo exhibition will look at the impact of nuclear weapons and recent progress toward their elimination from a humanitarian point of view. It will focus on the devastation caused by early use and testing of these weapons and civil society’s role in producing the 2017 treaty that bans them. The exhibition accompanies “A Survivor’s Story", an October 8 event featuring Setsuko Thurlow, who lived through the Hiroshima bombing and accepted the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons.

The exhibit is free and open to the public daily from Friday 4 - Tuesday 8 October, 8:00am - 10:00pm. 

Organized by the Armed Conflict and Civilian Protection Initiative, Hibakusha Stories/Youth Arts New York, and HLS Advocates for Human Rights.

Saturday 5th

Oct
5
Sat
Social, Exhibit

From the Atomic Bomb to the Nobel Peace Prize | Photo Exhibition

Oct 5, 8:00AM to Oct 8, 10:00PM
Wasserstein Campus Center (WCC) South Lobby, Harvard Law School; 1585 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge MA

This photo exhibition will look at the impact of nuclear weapons and recent progress toward their elimination from a humanitarian point of view. It will focus on the devastation caused by early use and testing of these weapons and civil society’s role in producing the 2017 treaty that bans them. The exhibition accompanies “A Survivor’s Story”, an October 8 event featuring Setsuko Thurlow, who lived through the Hiroshima bombing and accepted the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons.

Organized by the Armed Conflict and Civilian Protection Initiative, Hibakusha Stories/Youth Arts New York, and HLS Advocates for Human Rights. 

Sunday 6th

Oct
6
Sun
Social, Exhibit

From the Atomic Bomb to the Nobel Peace Prize | Photo Exhibition

8:00AM to 10:00PM
Wasserstein Campus Center (WCC) South Lobby, Harvard Law School; 1585 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge MA

This photo exhibition will look at the impact of nuclear weapons and recent progress toward their elimination from a humanitarian point of view. It will focus on the devastation caused by early use and testing of these weapons and civil society’s role in producing the 2017 treaty that bans them. The exhibition accompanies “A Survivor’s Story”, an October 8 event featuring Setsuko Thurlow, who lived through the Hiroshima bombing and accepted the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons.

Organized by the Armed Conflict and Civilian Protection Initiative, Hibakusha Stories/Youth Arts New York, and HLS Advocates for Human Rights. 

Monday 7th

Oct
7
Mon
Social, Exhibit

From the Atomic Bomb to the Nobel Peace Prize | Photo Exhibition

8:00AM to 10:00PM
Wasserstein Campus Center (WCC) South Lobby, Harvard Law School; 1585 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge MA

This photo exhibition will look at the impact of nuclear weapons and recent progress toward their elimination from a humanitarian point of view. It will focus on the devastation caused by early use and testing of these weapons and civil society’s role in producing the 2017 treaty that bans them. The exhibition accompanies “A Survivor’s Story”, an October 8 event featuring Setsuko Thurlow, who lived through the Hiroshima bombing and accepted the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons.

Organized by the Armed Conflict and Civilian Protection Initiative, Hibakusha Stories/Youth Arts New York, and HLS Advocates for Human Rights.

Oct
7
Mon
Lecture/Panel

15+ Years of PEPFAR: How US Action on HIV/AIDS Has Changed Global Health

9:00AM to 6:00PM
Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East, Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge

Join us for a one-day symposium to explore what enabled the President’s Emergency Plan For Aids Relief, a visionary program that has transformed not just the worldwide HIV/AIDS response but global health delivery more broadly. We will take a historically informed look at what it will take to stop global transmission of HIV, and share tools useful for others hoping to move the needle on vexing problems in global health. Speakers include Ambassador Deborah L. Birx, NIAID Director Anthony Fauci, Harvard University Professor Paul Farmer, and many others.

Register Here

This event is cosponsored by the Harvard Global Health Institute, the Harvard University Center for AIDS Research, the Center for Health Law Policy and Innovation at Harvard Law School, and the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School.

Oct
7
Mon
Lecture/Panel

Book Talk: Human Rights & Participatory Politics in Southeast Asia

12:00PM to 1:00PM
Wasserstein Hall, WCC 3016; 1585 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA USA

In this book, Dr. Catherine Renshaw recounts an extraordinary period of human rights institution-building in Southeast Asia. Dr. Catherine Renshaw is Deputy Head of the Thomas More Law School, based at the North Sydney campus. Her research focuses on international law, international human rights law, particularly in Southeast Asia, and regional systems for the promotion and protection of human rights. 

Lunch will be served. Co-sponsored by the Program on Law and Society in the Muslim World, HLS Advocates for Human Rights, and the Harvard Human Rights Journal.

Oct
7
Mon
Lecture/Panel, Performance, Reception

Bending the Arc: Film Screening and Panel Discussion

3:30PM to 6:00PM
Askwith Hall (inside Longfellow Hall), 13 Appian Way, Cambridge, MA 02138

Join us for a documentary film screening of Bending the Arc, the story of Partners in Health, followed by a discussion on global health equity, research, and resilience with Dr. Paul Farmer, Dr. Salmaan Keshavjee, and Dr. Mercedes Becerra from Harvard Medical School’s Department of Global Health & Social Medicine. After the 45-minute movie clip and panel discussion, enjoy light refreshments and an opportunity to connect with colleagues and celebrate Harvard’s international activities. Learn more and register for the event.

Hosted by Harvard Global Support Services (GSS). 

Oct
7
Mon
Lecture/Panel

Losing the Way in the City: Cities and Intellectual Crisis in Eleventh-Century China

4:00PM to 6:00PM
Common Room, 2 Divinity Avenue Camrbridge, MA

Literati of previous centuries had written the city in the past tense, in tales of dissolute youth and in memoirs about capitals destroyed, but had otherwise hidden urban streets behind a generic blur of dust and traffic. Literati in the eleventh century, in contrast, deemed the living streetscape a topic suitable for literary composition, and they changed the topography of literary genres in order to make a place for the city in writing. As a new literary subject, the urban streetscape afforded scope for original effects, but literati also wrote the city for ideological reasons...

Hosted by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, as part of its China Humanities Seminar. 

Oct
7
Mon
Social, Information Session/Networking

Student Info Session: January Programs in Latin America

4:30PM to 6:00PM
CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge Street, Room S216

Interested in spending January in Latin America? Come to the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies (DRCLAS) Info Session to learn how you can get involved in the region over casual refreshments. Gain internship experience, study, or participate in experiential learning through immersive programs offered this January.

Tuesday 8th

Oct
8
Tue
Social, Exhibit

From the Atomic Bomb to the Nobel Peace Prize | Photo Exhibition

8:00AM to 10:00PM
Wasserstein Campus Center (WCC) South Lobby, Harvard Law School; 1585 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge MA

This photo exhibition will look at the impact of nuclear weapons and recent progress toward their elimination from a humanitarian point of view. It will focus on the devastation caused by early use and testing of these weapons and civil society’s role in producing the 2017 treaty that bans them. The exhibition accompanies “A Survivor’s Story”, an October 8 event featuring Setsuko Thurlow, who lived through the Hiroshima bombing and accepted the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons.

Organized by the Armed Conflict and Civilian Protection Initiative, Hibakusha Stories/Youth Arts New York, and HLS Advocates for Human Rights. 

Oct
8
Tue
Lecture/Panel

A Survivor's Story: From the Atomic Bomb to the Nobel Peace Prize

12:00PM to 1:30PM
Wasserstein Hall WCC B015, 1585 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA USA

Setsuko Thurlow, a native of Hiroshima, will describe her journey from atomic bomb survivor to nuclear disarmament advocate. In 2017, she accepted the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), which had spearheaded efforts to achieve a treaty banning nuclear weapons. Food will be served at the event.

This event is accompanied by a photo exhibition, "From the Atomic Bomb to the Nobel Peace Prize", on display in the South Lobby of the HLS Wasserstein Campus Center. 

Introductory Remarks by Bonnie Docherty, Associate Director of Armed Conflict and Civilian Protection.

Organized by the Armed Conflict and Civilian Protection Initiative. Co-sponsored by the Human Rights Program and HLS Advocates for Human Rights.

Oct
8
Tue
Lecture/Panel

Population Pressures: Migration, Repression, and Agrarian Reform in Latin America

12:00PM to 1:00PM
CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge Street, Room S250

The Tuesday Seminar Series is a bring your own brown bag lunch series. Please feel free to enjoy your lunch at the lecture, drinks will be provided.

Emily Sellars, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Yale University

Hosted by David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies

Oct
8
Tue
Lecture/Panel

Designing the South: Emerging Accounts of Technology, Entrepreneurship, and Collaboration between Africa and China

4:00PM to 6:00PM
Center for African Studies, 1280 Massachusetts Ave., 3rd Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138

From the height of the copy-cat manufacturing years to the current era of big tech represented by the likes of Alibaba, Huawei, Tencent, etc., Chinese technology has contributed to much of the ambivalence around the country’s perceived global ascendancy. Particularly in the global south where China’s economic activity favors infrastructure building, Chinese tech firms have come to represent both innovation and expediency, even as they are perceived as security threats and agents of neocolonial enterprise. In Africa, firms such as the Shenzhen based Transsion also exemplify what is best described as a tenacious pursuit of markets at the so-called bottom of the pyramid, showcasing what the south of China has come to be known for: agile design and manufacturing that offers a wide range of price and quality to suit different customers.

Event Presenter:
Seyram Avle, PhD (Assistant Professor, Department of Communication, University of Massachusetts, Amherst) 

Hosted by Harvard Center for African Studies, Harvard Asia Center, Harvard Fairbank Center, Harvard Yenching Institute

Oct
8
Tue
Lecture/Panel

Harvard China Health Partnership Seminar: Ten years of health-care reform in China – Progress and gaps in Universal Health Cover

6:00PM to 8:00PM
Kresge Building, Room G3; 677 Huntington Avenue Boston MA 02115

In 2009, China launched a major health-care reform and pledged to provide all citizens with equal access to basic health care with reasonable quality and financial risk protection. The Government quadrupled its funding for health, expanded social insurance for all, and encouraged local governments to conduct pilots to reform their health delivery system. Professor Yip’s team has shown that China has made substantial progress in improving equal access to care and enhancing financial protection, especially for people of lower socioeconomic status. However, gaps remain in quality of care, control of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), efficiency in delivery, control of health expenditures, and public satisfaction. Professor Yip will be joined by a panel of speakers who will comment on future prospects for China’s health care system and will engage with the audience on lessons to be drawn for other countries aspiring to achieve universal health coverage.

Featuring Professor Winnie Yip, Professor of the Practice of International Health Policy and Economics, Harvard Chan School. 

Discussants: Barry Bloom, William Hsiao, and Hong Wang. 

Hosted by Harvard China Health Partnership. 

 

Wednesday 9th

Oct
9
Wed
Lecture/Panel

Occupying Schools, Occupying Land: How the Landless Workers Movement Transformed Brazilian Education

12:00PM to 2:00PM
CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge Street, Room S050

Rebecca Tarlau will present on her recently published book, Occupying Schools, Occupying Land (2019 Oxford University Press), which explores how activists from the Brazilian Landless Workers Movement (MST) have pressured municipalities, states, and the federal government to implement pedagogical practices fostering activism, direct democracy, and collective forms of work in public schools and universities, affecting hundreds of thousands of students.

Event presenter: Rebecca Tarlau, Assistant Professor of Education and of Labor and Employment Relations, Pennsylvania State University.

Oct
9
Wed
Lecture/Panel

John Holden - Critical Issues Confronting China Series

12:30PM to 1:30PM
CGIS South S020, Belfer Case Study Room; 1730 Cambridge Street Cambridge MA USA

Holden’s China career spans more than four decades, twenty-eight years of which he spent on the ground in Beijing, Hong Kong, and Taipei.  He most recently served as President and CEO of the US-China Strong Foundation after a decade in Beijing as Managing Director and Senior Counselor for Hill+Knowlton Strategies; Founding Chairman of Shaklee (China) Ltd.; Associate Dean at Peking University’s Yenching Academy and Professor of Practice at its Guanghua School of Management. While at Peking University, Holden received the Friendship Award, the most prestigious honor granted by China to foreigners.

Hosted by Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies as part of its Critical Issues Confronting China Series. 

Oct
9
Wed
Lecture/Panel, Social, Information Session/Networking, Reception

Climate Change, the Environment and Oral Health

4:00PM to 6:30PM
Harvard School of Dental Medicine, REB Auditorium & Lobby, 190 Longwood Avenue Boston, MA 02115

The panel will showcase some of HSDM’s work around the globe. We will convene our faculty to share their research in the "one health" concept and how the environment, veterinary medicine and craniofacial disease are linked; how the environment is impacting pediatric health globally; and how dental care and disease management are impacting the environment and climate.

Event Presenters:
Donna Hackley, DMD, MA, Instructor, Oral Health Policy & Epidemiology, Harvard School of Dental Medicine;
Philip J. Landrigan, MD, Professor, Biology, Director, Global Public Health Program and Global Pollution Observatory, Boston College;
Bjorn Olsen, MD, PhD, Professor, Developmental Biology, Hersey Professor of Cell Biology, Harvard School of Dental Medicine;
Renee Salas, MD (Moderator), Instructor in Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital   

Harvard School of Dental Medicine Office of Global and Community Health

Oct
9
Wed
Lecture/Panel

Harvard Worldwide Week: RCC Postdoctoral Researchers Showcase

5:30PM to 7:00PM
RCC at Harvard, 26 Trowbridge Street, Cambridge MA 02138

RCC postdoctoral fellows at Harvard University will give short scientific and pedagogic talks about their research topics at Harvard University or their home Universities. These multidisciplinary, 10 minutes-long talks will be adapted for a general audience and will be followed by fruitful discussion. The goals are to disseminate knowledge, highlight the work of international scholars from Spain doing work at Harvard University as well as the generation and consolidation of new connections between members of the Harvard community and international visitors who have interest in the RCC community.

Event Presenters:
Alba Carrillo Vega, Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital; 
Diego Chapinal, Postdoctoral Researcher at Department of the Classics at Harvard University; 
Eva Gil González, Postdoctoral Fellow at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences; 
Maria Luisa Gil, Postdoctoral Researcher at Massachusetts General Hospital (Harvard Medical School);
Briseida Sofia Jiménez, Visiting Researcher at the Institute of Global Law & Policy at Harvard Law School;
Irene Lebrusán, Postdoctoral Researcher at Institute for Global Law and Policy at Harvard Law School;
Alejandro Llanos Garrido, Postdoctoral Researcher at Bioinformatics for the FAS Informatics Group at Harvard University;
Marta Pérez, Postdoctoral fellow at the MassGeneral Institute of Neurodegenerative Disease (MIND) and affiliate of Harvard Medical School;
Alfonso Sánchez Moya, Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Department of Government (FAS), Harvard University.

Hosted by Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard (RCC). 

Oct
9
Wed
Social, Information Session/Networking, Reception

All-Harvard Africa Mixer

6:00PM to 8:00PM
CGIS South Concourse - 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

The Harvard Center for African Studies invites you to join us for our annual All-Harvard Africa Mixer with African Food and Music! Learn about Africa-related activities and events planned for the Fall semester from students, faculty affiliates, and guests from across the university.

Oct
9
Wed
Lecture/Panel

ERRE: A conversation with Mexican artist Marcos Ramírez

6:30PM to 8:00PM
Senior Common Room (Standish Hall), Winthrop House

Artist Marcos Ramírez (ERRE) in conversation with Professor Doris Sommer, Ira and Jewell Williams Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures and of African and African American Studies and José Falconi (Lecturer in Fine Arts, Brandeis University)

Marcos Ramírez, known as ERRE, was born in Tijuana in 1961. He studied at the Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, graduating with a law degree, and later worked in the construction industry for many years to support his visual art practice. He has been the subject of a number of solo exhibitions at institutions including the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, CA (2016), Museum of Latin American Art, Long Beach, CA (2014), MACLA/Movimiento de Arte y Cultura Latino Americana, San Jose, CA (2012), Museo de Arte Carrillo Gil, Mexico City (2010), and Centro Cultural Tijuana, Mexico (1996).

Hosted by David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies. Presented in collaboration with the Cultural Agents, the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, and the Committee on Immigration at Harvard

 

Oct
9
Wed
Performance

International Comedy Night with Cristela Alonzo

7:00PM to 9:00PM
Smith Campus Center, 1350 Massachusetts Avenue, Harvard Commons, 1st Floor

Get a fresh new perspective on the world. Join us for a dose of international-themed humor with Netflix comedian Cristela Alonzo and the Harvard College Stand-Up Comic Society.

About Cristela Alonzo Described as a “comedian and truth-teller,” Cristela Alonzo made history in 2014 when she became the first Latina to create, produce, and star in her own network sitcom Cristela for ABC. During that same year, she split her time between LA and NYC to serve as one of ABC’s favorite guest hosts on their hit daytime talk show, The View. In 2017, Cristela made history again when she became the first Latina lead in a Disney Pixar film when she voiced the part of Cruz Ramirez in Cars 3. Her first stand-up special, Lower Classy, is currently streaming on Netflix. Cristela’s memoir, Music to My Years, will be released on October 8, 2019, by Atria Books, an imprint of Simon & Schuster. Cristela grew up in challenging circumstances, in an undocumented family at the Texas border. Her hilarious stories unmask the realities and absurdities of being an immigrant kid, and grown-up, in America. Read more about Cristela at http://cristelaalonzo.com.

About the Harvard College Stand-Up Comic Society Founded in 2007, the Harvard College Stand-Up Comic Society (“Harvard College SUCS”) has been entertaining audiences in Sanders Theatre, Queens Head Pub, the Science Center, Fong Auditorium, the Gotham Comedy Club, and one random Rotary Club ever since. During their time with the Society, members have been seen at Improv Boston, the Comedy Studio, the Laugh Factory, and Last Comic Standing, and alumni have gone on to appear on Late Night, America's Got Talent, Last Comic Standing, the Boston Comedy Festival, and many other festivals and showcases. They've also been called a "ragtag band of misfits" by Cosmopolitan magazine.

No tickets are required. This event is FREE and open to the public—at the newly renovated Smith Campus Center in the heart of Harvard Square. 

Hosted by the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs. 

Thursday 10th

Oct
10
Thu
Lecture/Panel, Social

Molinillos and Chocolate in Contemporary Mexico

3:00PM to 4:30PM
Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA

In this special event, Juan Alonso Rodriguez will explain how to make a molinillo, the whisk-like wooden tool that is traditionally used in Mexico to make froth in chocolate beverages. Together with Ana Rita García-Lascuráin, he will discuss the history of chocolate production in Mexico and its current renaissance. Using molinillos, members of the Cambridge-based Fine Cacao and Chocolate Institute will make three different chocolate beverages that participants can taste during the program. Advance registration required. Participants must be 18+. $8 members/$10 nonmembers

Presented by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology in collaboration with the Fine Cacao and Chocolate Institute, the Mexican Consulate General in Boston, Fundación MUCHO Mexico City, and MassMex, as part of the 2019 New England Chocolate Festival, Harvard Museums of Science & Culture

Oct
10
Thu
Reception, Social

Harvard Chan CultureFest

5:30PM to 7:00PM
Kresge Cafeteria, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue Boston MA 02115

The Office for Student Affairs at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health invites you to participate in our annual CultureFest event on Thursday October 10th from 5:30-7:00 PM. Celebrate our diverse community with cultural snacks, music, activities, and more! All Harvard affiliates are welcome to attend this fun, social, and community-centered event. Contact studentaffairs@hsph.harvard.edu with any questions. 

Hosted by Harvard T.H. Chan Office for Student Affairs. 

 

Oct
10
Thu
Lecture/Panel

Plants Go to War: A Botanical History of World War II

6:30PM to 8:00PM
Arnold Arboretum, Hunnewell Building, 125 Arborway, Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

Judith Sumner, PhD, Author and Botanist 1 Session: Thursday, October 10, 6:30–8:00pm [HB] Location: Hunnewell Building As the first botanical history of World War II, Plants Go to War examines military history from the perspective of plant science. From victory gardens to drugs, timber, rubber, and fibers, plants supplied materials with key roles in victory. Author and botanist Judith Sumner will speak of the many plants that were incorporated into wartime safety materials, diet and rations, and even bombers. Free, registration requested.

Hosted by The Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University.

Friday 11th

Oct
11
Fri
Lecture/Panel

By Force of Power: Social-Science Knowledge, Political Power, and the Economics Profession in Communist-Era Hungary

2:00PM to 3:30PM
CGIS South Building, Room S153 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA, 02138

The seminar will discuss how expertise in the social sciences was affected by political power during the Cold War, using the specific case of Hungary.

Oct
11
Fri
Lecture/Panel

The Fragility of Connection: Roads, State, and Religion in Ancient Japan

4:30PM to 6:00PM
Porte Room (S250), 2nd level, CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge St., Cambridge, MA

Event Presenters:
Speaker: Bryan D. Lowe, Assistant Professor of Religion, Princeton University
Moderator: Ryuichi Abe, Reischauer Institute Professor of Japanese Religions,
Harvard University

Hosted by Edwin O. Reischauer Japan Forum Lecture Series, co-sponsored by the Harvard Buddhist Studies Forum