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Worldwide Week at Harvard 2017

Scroll below for events that took place 22-28 October 2017

More about the next Worldwide Week, taking place 20-27 October, 2018

Worldwide Week at Harvard showcases the remarkable breadth of Harvard’s global engagement. During Worldwide Week, Harvard Schools, research centers, departments, and student organizations hosted academic and cultural events with global or international themes.

Travel Fellowship Contest:  Students were invited to visit photo exhibits across campus and tell us where the photos were taken! Prizes include summer travel fellowships, and generous gift certificates to Harvard Square restaurants, the Coop, and JP Licks. Winners were notified in December 2017.

Jump to: Large venue events

Jump to: Sunday  ~  Monday  ~  Tuesday  ~  Wednesday  ~  Thursday  ~  Friday  ~  Saturday

Worldwide Week at Harvard Logo

Worldwide Week Events

Sunday 22nd

Oct
22
Sun
Other

International Music Programming

Oct 22 to Oct 28
On air at WHRB 95.3 FM,or stream live at https://www.whrb.org/

Harvard Radio WHRB 95.3FM

 

Oct
22
Sun
Festival

International Festival

2:00PM to 6:00PM
Science Center Plaza

~~LARGE VENUE EVENT~~

The Harvard Graduate Council, in collaboration with student organizations from across the University, will host the kick-off event to Worldwide Week. Join the celebration!! Student musicians and singers will provide the soundtrack for an afternoon of global fare, dance and acitivities. 

Hosted by the Harvard Graduate Council

Free and open to the public

Monday 23rd

Oct
23
Mon
Seminar

Science, Technology and Society Seminar: STS Circle at Harvard

12:15PM to 2:00PM
Pierce Hall Room 100F, 29 Oxford Street Cambridge, MA

 

"Remapping Knowledge Exchange: Scientific Agriculture in Sonora, Mexico and Punjab, India"

Speaker: 
Gabriela Soto Laveaga, Professor, Department of the History of Science, Harvard University

Chair: 
Sheila Jasanoff, Pforzheimer Professor of Science and Technology Studies, Harvard Kennedy School

View seminar details and RSVP

Hosted by the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, co-sponsored by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

Open to the Harvard community. Registration is required. 

Oct
23
Mon
Lecture/Panel

China's Future Leadership: An Instant Analysis of China's 19th Party Congress

12:30PM to 2:00PM
Belfer Case Study Room, CGIS South S020, 1730 Cambridge Street Cambridge MA

Moderator:
Mark Elliott, Mark Schwartz Professor of Chinese and Inner Asian History and Vice Provost for International Affairs, featuring expert panelists with questions from the audience. 

Panelists:
Anthony Saich, Director of the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation and Daewoo Professor of International Affairs
Joseph Fewsmith, Professor of International Relations and Political Science at the BU Pardee School
Elizabeth Perry, Henry Rosovsky Professor of Government and Director of the Harvard-Yenching Institute
Edward Wong, journalist and a foreign correspondent for The New York Times
Huang Yasheng, International Program Professor in Chinese Economy and Business and a Professor of Global Economics and Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management

Join the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies and the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation for a panel discussion where experts weigh in with exclusive insight and opinions on China’s 19th Party Congress.

Hosted by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies and the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation. 

Open to the Harvard community. 

Oct
23
Mon
Lecture/Panel

The Effect of Shifting Global Health & Climate Change Policies on Malaria Eradication

1:00PM to 2:30PM
Kresge Building Room G1, 665 Huntington Ave. Boston, MA; Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

 

Speakers:
Aaron Bernstein, MD, MPH, Associate Director, Center for Health and the Global Environment, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Hospitalist, Division of General Pediatrics, Boston Children’s Hospital
Marcia Castro, PhD, Associate Professor of Demography, Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Alan Court, Senior Advisor, UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Health in Agenda 2030 and for Malaria
Elfatih Eltahir, PhD, Breene M. Kerr Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Associate Department Head, Civil and Environmental Engineering, MIT

The US government has been engaged in global health activities for more than a century. Today, the US is the largest funder and implementer of global health programs worldwide with multi-pronged, multi-billion dollar investments that target a myriad of global health challenges, countries, and stakeholders. As global health and climate change priorities shift within the US government — from withdrawing from the landmark Paris Climate Agreement to severe decreases in global health funding — what is the impact on major public health threats like malaria? Join us for a discussion about the future of disease control and eradication in the context of political instability and climate change.

Hosted by Harvard's Defeating Malaria: From the Genes to the Globe Initiative.

Open to the Harvard community. RSVP to

to register for the event. 

Oct
23
Mon
Lecture/Panel

Women & the Global Health Workforce

2:00PM to 5:00PM
Radcliffe Gymnasium, Knafel Center 18 Mason Street Cambridge, MA

~~LARGE VENUE EVENT~~

Speakers:

Anne Becker, PhD, MD | Maude and Lillian Presley Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School
Ana Langer, MD | Director, Women and Health Initiative; Professor of the Practice of Public Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Ashish Jha, MD, MPH | Director, Harvard Global Health Institute; K.T. Li Professor of International Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Sania Nishtar, SI, FRCP, PhD | Founder and President, Heartfile; Former Federal Minister, Government of Pakistan
Julia M. Reilly, MD | Resident in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Harvard Medical School
Nazneen Damji, MSc | United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women

Women all over the world are a driving force powering the production of health in their homes, in their communities, and as part of the health workforce. Harvard faculty, staff and students are developing innovative solutions to eliminate the persistent social and gender inequalities that hold women back, unleashing their full potential for the betterment of health and well-being. This symposium will explore the gender dimensions of the production of health and wellness, including the recruitment, training and retention of the health workforce; differences in the quality of services and patient experience of care; gender transformative policies including parental leave and pay equity; and women’s leadership and decision-making within global health.

Hosted by Harvard Global Health Institute and the Women and Health Initiative at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Open to the Harvard community. RSVP at globalhealth.harvard.edu/event/womenGH

Oct
23
Mon
Seminar

Book Talk: Unsettling the Occupation: Where Do We Go From Here?

4:00PM to 5:00PM
Littauer Building, Fainsod Room 324, 79 JFK Street Cambridge, MA

A seminar with Gershon Shafir, Professor of Sociology, University of California - San Diego, on his recent book A Half Century of Occupation: Israel, Palestine, and the World's Most Intractable Conflict

About the book: 
The Israel-Palestine conflict is one of the world’s most polarizing confrontations. Its current phase, Israel’s “temporary” occupation of the West Bank, Gaza, and East Jerusalem, turned a half century old in June 2017. In these timely and provocative essays, Gershon Shafir asks three questions—What is the occupation, why has it lasted so long, and how has it transformed the Israeli-Palestinian conflict? His cogent answers illuminate how we got here, what here is, and where we are likely to go. Shafir expertly demonstrates that at its fiftieth year, the occupation is riven with paradoxes, legal inconsistencies, and conflicting interests that weaken the occupiers’ hold and leave the occupation itself vulnerable to challenge.

About the author: 
Gershon Shafir is Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of California, San Diego, and the founding director of its Human Rights Program. He has served as President of the Association for Israel Studies and is the author or editor of ten books, among them Land, Labor, and the Origins of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, 1882–1914. He is also the coauthor, with Yoav Peled, of Being Israeli: The Dynamics of Multiple Citizenship, which won the Middle Eastern Studies Association’s Albert Hourani Award in 2002, and the coeditor, with Mark Levine, of Struggle and Survival in Palestine/Israel.

Hosted by the Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center and Middle East Initiative Speaker Series. 

Free and open to the public.

Oct
23
Mon
Lecture/Panel

China Humanities Seminar - Tina Lu

4:00PM to 6:00PM
CGIS Knafel K262, 1737 Cambridge Street Cambridge MA

Moderators:
Wai-yee Li, Professor of Chinese Literature, Harvard University
Xiaofei Tian, Professor of Chinese Literature, Harvard University

Speaker:
Tina Lu, Yale University

At Yale she has served as EALL’s Director of Graduate Studies and Director of Undergraduate Studies and is currently Chair.  Her research and teaching focuses on the literature of the late imperial period, from around 1550 to around 1750.  Major publications include Persons, Roles and Minds (Stanford, 2001), Accidental Incest, Filial Cannibalism, and Other Peculiar Encounters in Late Imperial Chinese Literature (Harvard East Asian Monographs, 2009), a book-length chapter on late Ming literary culture in The Cambridge History of Chinese Literature, v.2, and a co-edited volume on Approaches to Teaching The Story of the Stone (MLA).

Hosted by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies.

Open to the Harvard community.

Oct
23
Mon
Lecture/Panel

The Bolshevik Revolution and the Ukrainian Famine

4:15PM to 6:00PM
Belfer Case Study Room (S-020), CGIS-South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA

    Anne Applebaum will present research from her latest book, RED FAMINE:
    STALIN’S WAR ON UKRAINE, as part of the Ukrainian Research Institute's
    series "Ukraine in the Flames of the 1917 Revolution." The talk, “Holodomor
    Reconsidered: The Bolshevik Revolution and the Ukrainian Famine,” will
    reveal what motivated Josef Stalin to use a man-made famine to exterminate
    millions of Ukrainians in the 1930s. This event is co-sponsored by the Nieman
    Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University.

    In RED FAMINE, Applebaum uses newly available archival material to
    demonstrate that the Ukrainian Famine of 1932-33 (commonly known at the
    Holodomor) was not caused purely by natural climate conditions or failures of
    collectivization, but was intentionally exacerbated and used by Stalin to
    destroy the Ukrainian peasantry. More than three million Ukrainians perished
    as a result of the famine, making it the most lethal in European history.

    Qualifying as genocide under the original definition of that term, Applebaum
    argues, the Holodomor was fueled by the state’s decision to close off the
    Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic’s borders and to seize all available
    food, not just the already exorbitant grain quotas. At the October 23 event,
    Applebaum will focus on why Stalin sought to exterminate Ukrainians,
    motivations that can be traced to revolutionary events starting in 1917.

    Given Russia’s 2014 annexation of Crimea, the ongoing Russian-Ukrainian
    war, and the rise of the “Cult of Stalin” in Russia (which is supported
    by President Vladimir Putin, who, in turn, has received the praise of
    President Donald Trump), these timely revelations have implications for the
    present day, as well.

    There will be time for questions and an opportunity to purchase copies of the
    book.

Oct
23
Mon
Lecture/Panel

Science in Spain

4:30PM to 6:00PM
26 Trowbridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

RCC Harvard will host a series of events dedicated to a wide variety of topics. Our first event of this series will be Science in Spain, organized through the initiative Science@RCC. The event will consist of a round table discussion regarding recent achievements of the Spanish science, possible improvements, as well as challenges and future developments. We will also discuss the Spanish entrepreneurial and innovation ecosystems, understanding its strengths and weaknesses in comparison to other important global poles of innovation and entrepreneurship as Silicon Valley or Cambridge. We will emphasize how the presence of international researchers and teams strengthens Harvard’s position within the scientific community. The speakers will share their experience in several research institutions both in Spain and the US: Harvard University, MIT, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain's National Research Council (CSIC) and Universidad Complutense de Madrid.

This is an open event and we welcome the participation of the audience. We especially encourage fellows from Science@RCC to share their ideas and participate in the debate.

We will host an informal reception after the event.

Oct
23
Mon
Reception

"The Harvard Cubans" Film Screening and Q&A with Director

6:00PM to 8:00PM
Tsai Auditorium S010, CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts

The Harvard Cubans (Los cubanos de Harvard) is a documentary film produced by the Cuba Studies Program and directed by Danny González Lucena. Following this premiere screening of the film, a question-and-answer session will be held with the director. Please note the 58-minute film is in Spanish with English subtitles. Reception to follow.

About the film: In the year 1900, more than half of all Cuban public school teachers from across the island boarded five American military ships to travel to Cambridge to participate in a Summer School organized by Harvard, the largest such endeavor ever undertaken by the University. The purpose of the trip was to expose the teachers to modern methods in pedagogy and to the great advances of American society. In spring 2016, Cuban journalist and documentarian Danny González Lucena conducted archival research, interviews and filming at Harvard, culminating in the production of the documentary Los cubanos de Harvard (The Harvard Cubans).

Hosted by the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies (DRCLAS). 

Open to the Harvard community. 

Oct
23
Mon
Seminar

African Studies Workshop featuring Nanna Schneiderman

6:00PM to 8:00PM
Robinson Hall, Lower Library, 35 Quincy Street Cambridge, MA

Speaker:
Dr. Nanna Schneiderman, postdoc at Oslo and Akershus University College, Norway

"Who cooks and who eats? Artists as cultural brokers in Ugandan election campaigns."

Nanna Schneidermann is a social anthropologist born, raised and educated in Aarhus, Denmark. She now works as a postdoc at Oslo and Akershus University College in Norway as part of MediAfrica, a research project investigating the role of new media in social change in Africa.

A week in advance, the presenter’s paper will be circulated through the Harvard African Studies Workshop listserv. It is assumed that everyone has read the paper before the workshop.  After presentation and commentary, Workshop attendees are invited to engage in critique and discussion, under the moderation of the Workshop Chairs.

Convened by Professors Jean and John Comaroff, and hosted by the Center for African Studies.

Oct
23
Mon
Lecture/Panel

Are You a Global Citizen? Is That a Good Thing? The Meaning of Global Citizenship

7:00PM to 8:30PM
Science Center, Hall B, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

~~LARGE VENUE EVENT~~

Panelists: 
Danielle Allen, James Bryan Conant University Professor and Director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics
Homi Bhabha, Anne F. Rothenburg Professor of the Humanities and Director of the Mahindra Humanities Center
Rakesh Khurana, Marvin Bower Professor of Leadership Development and Danoff Dean of Harvard College
Dani Rodrik, Ford Foundation Professor of International Political Economy

Conversation moderated by NPR's Tom Ashbrook (host of On Point), featuring a panel of Harvard faculty considering a range of issues pertaining to varied notions of citizenship, in particular: What is meant by "global citizenship"? The panelists will initiate a critical examination of the proposition of global citizenship, its benefits, costs and associated issues such as migration, nationalism and economic inequality. 

Hosted by the Office of the Vice Provost for International Affairs. 

Open to the Harvard community. 
 

Tuesday 24th

Oct
24
Tue
Lecture/Panel

Looking Back, Moving Forward: The Evolution of Malaria

12:00PM to 1:30PM
Snyder Auditorium, Kresge G1, 677 Huntington Avenue Boston MA

Opening Remarks:
Allan M. Brandt, PhD; Professor of the History of Science, Amalie Moses Kass Professor of the History of Medicine, Harvard University

Moderator & Speakers:
Regina Rabinovich, MPH, MD; ExxonMobil Malaria Scholar in Residence, Harvard University; Director, Malaria Elimination Initiative, Barcelona Institute for Global Health
Jesse Bump, PhD; Executive Director, Takemi Program in International Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Joseph Cook, MPH, MD; Adjunct Professor of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
Conrad Keating*, Writer in Residence; Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, Oxford University
Irene Koek, Senior Deputy Assistant, USAID Global Health Bureau, President's Malaria Initiative
Daniel Neafsey, PhD; Assistant Professor, Department of Immunology & Infectious Diseases,Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Dyann F. Wirth, PhD; Richard Pearson Strong Professor & Chair, Department of Immunology & Infectious Diseases, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Senior Associate Member, Broad Institute

Join us for a reflective look back on the history of neglected tropical diseases, and a future-oriented discussion of academia's role in setting the R&D agenda for malaria eradication by leading experts in the fields of global health delivery, medicine, health policy and malaria research and development. 

Open to the Harvard community. RSVP to

to register for the event. 

Hosted by Harvard's Defeating Malaria: From the Genes to the Globe Initiative, Takemi Program in International Health, and Harvard T.H Chan School of Public Health. 

*Harvard Coop Booksellers will have sale copies of Kenneth Warren and the Great Neglected Diseases of Mankind Programme, The Transformation of Geographical Medicine in the US and Beyond.

 

Oct
24
Tue
Lecture/Panel

Japan's Imperial Household and Abdication: The Contemporary Controversy in Historical Perspective

12:30PM to 2:00PM
Bowie-Vernon Room, K262 CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street Cambridge

Moderator:
Susan Pharr, Edwin O. Reischauer Professor of Japanese Politics and Director of WCFIA Program on U.S. - Japan Relations, Harvard University. 

Featured guest:
Kenneth Ruoff, Professor of History and Director of the Center for Japanese Studies, Portland State University.

Discussant:
Andrew Gordon, Lee and Juliet Folger Fund Professor of History and Victor and William Fung Acting Director of the Asia Center (2016-2017), Harvard University.

This seminar is part of a weekly seminar series sponsored by a grant from the Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership (CGP). 

Co-sponsored by the Program on U.S. - Japan Relations and the Edwin O. Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies.

Open to the Harvard community. 

Oct
24
Tue
Lecture/Panel

The History of U.S.- China Relations

12:30PM to 2:00PM
CGIS South Room S050, 1730 Cambridge Street Cambridge, MA

Moderator:
Michael Szonyi, Professor of Chinese History and Director of the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies

Speaker:
John Delury, Associate Professor of Chinese Studies, Yonsei University

A graduate of Yale University, Professor Delury is an accomplished historian of modern China and expert on North Korean affairs.  He is the author, with Orville Schell, of Wealth and Power: China’s Long March to the Twenty-first Century  (Random House, 2013), which has been translated into Chinese, Japanese and Korean. Prior to joining the Yonsei faculty in 2010, Professor Delury taught courses in Chinese history and politics at Brown, Columbia, and Yale, as well as Peking University.  He is a Senior Fellow (non-resident) of the Center on U.S.-China Relations, Asia Society (New York), where he previously served as associate director.  He is also a term member of the Council of Foreign Relations, member of the National Committee on North Korea, and fellow in the National Committee on US-China Relations’ public intellectuals program. Recent writings appear in Foreign Affairs , Foreign Policy , Late Imperial China , Asian Perspective , and 38 North.

Hosted by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies.

Open to the Harvard community. 

Oct
24
Tue
Lecture/Panel

Economic Development Workshop

2:45PM to 4:00PM
Harvard Hall Room 104, Harvard Yard Cambridge, MA

"The Mediation Deficit: When Information Isn't Enough to Take-Up Welfare Programs"

Speaker: 
Sarika Gupta, PhD Candidate, Public Policy Program , Harvard University

Chairs:
Michael Kremer, Faculty Associate. Gates Professor of Developing Societies, Department of Economics, Harvard University
Jie Bai, Assistant Professor of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School
Anders Jensen, Assistant Professor of  Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School
Melissa Dell, Faculty Associate. Assistant Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, Harvard University
Asim Khwaja, Faculty Associate. Sumitomo-Foundation for Advanced Studies on International Development Professor of International Finance and Development, Harvard Kennedy School

Open to the Harvard community. 

Oct
24
Tue
Lecture/Panel

Global Health as a Tool of Diplomacy

3:30PM to 6:00PM
REB Auditorium, HSDM 190 Longwood Avenue, Boston Massachusetts 02115

Moderator:
Brittany Seymour, DDS, MPH; Assistant Professor, Harvard School of Dental Medicine

Speakers:
Vanessa Kerry, MD, MSc; Founder and CEO, Seed Global Health
Donna Hackley, DMD, MA; Instructor, Harvard School of Dental Medicine
Brett Henson, DMD; Colonel, HQDA, Office of the Surgeon General (Army), 2017 Harvard Kennedy School National Security Fellow
Lois Cohen, PhD; Paul G. Rogers Ambassador for Global Health Research, Consultant, NIDCR, National Institutes of Health

Panel & Discussion: 3:30PM - 5:00PM
Reception & Networking: 5:00PM - 6:00PM Wine, beer and refreshments will be served

Hosted by Harvard School of Dental Medicine (HSDM) Office of Global and Community Health

*RSVP Required* Please reply to hsdm_gch@hsdm.harvard.edu by Friday, October 20, 2017.

 

Oct
24
Tue
Lecture/Panel

Looking Back, Informing the Future: A Multidisciplinary Research on the 1947 Paritition of British India

4:00PM to 7:00PM
Tsai Auditorium, CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge Street Cambridge, MA

Panelists:

Rahul Mehrotra, Professor of Urban Design and Planning, Harvard University
Tarun Khanna, Director, Harvard South Asia Institute; Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor at the Harvard Business School
Karim R. Lakhani, Professor of Business Administration at the Harvard Business School
Jennifer Leaning, François-Xavier Bagnoud Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights; Director, FXB Center for Health and Human Rights, Harvard University)

2017 marks the 70th anniversary of the Partition of British India, as well as the launch of Harvard’s Lakshmi Mittal South Asia Institute’s major research on Partition. Panelists discuss the complexities of large-scale human migration and resettlements. Such lessons can inform current cross-border displacement and the corresponding growth of urban settlements and cities.

Open to the Harvard community.
Hosted by the Lakshmi Mittal South Asia Institute.

Oct
24
Tue
Lecture/Panel

The Role of an International Center in Supporting the University's Global Presence: Programs and Collaborations in Greece

4:00PM to 5:45PM
William James Hall Auditorium B1 / 33 Kirkland St, Cambridge, MA 02138

 

Opening remarks: 
Gregory Nagy, Francis Jones Professor of Classical Greek Literature and Professor of Comparative Literature and Director of Center for Hellenic Studies, Harvard University
Moderator: 
Nicolas Prevalakis, Lecturer on Social Studies, Committee on Degrees in Social Studies & Assistant Director of Curricular Development, Center for Hellenic Studies, Harvard University

First panel: Teaching Internships Program, Cultural Internships Program and Harvard Summer Program in Greece

Faculty perspectives:
Kevin Caffrey, Lecturer on Social Studies, Harvard University
Nicole Newendorp, Assistant Director of Studies for Juniors and Seniors & Lecturer on Social Studies, Harvard University
Dimiter Angelov, Dumbarton Oaks Professor of Byzantine History. Student perspectives: , Harvard University


Student perspectives: 
Thomas Elliott, Allison Toledo, Kate Yoon, Layla Siddig, Andy Secondine, Harvard University

 

 

Second panel: Organzing International Conferences Abroad, Developing Travel Study Programs in Greece, Developing Travel Study Programs in Greece, Developing International Collaborations, Developing Collaboration Across Disciplines

Panelists:
David Elmer, Professor of the Classics, Harvard University
Trearty Bartley, Director, Travel Program, HAA, Harvard University
Rhea Lesage, Librarian for Hellenic Studies and Coordinator for the Classics & Associate of the Center for Hellenic Studies, Harvard University
Kate Anable, Department Administrator, Undergraduate Program Administrator

Faculty, students, and other colleagues from the Harvard community are invited to share their experiences and perspectives in working on different aspects of the University’s international presence in cooperation with Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies (CHS). How can an international Center support the global presence of the University through the development of new educational and collaborative templates and/or the expansion of existing ones?

Open to the Harvard community.
Hosted by the Center for Hellenic Studies.

 

 

 

Oct
24
Tue
Lecture/Panel

Islam and Democracy

4:15PM to 5:30PM
Allison Dining Room, 5th Floor Taubman Building, 79 JFK Street Cambridge MA

Panelists: 
Kristin E. Fabbe, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School
Sophie Lemiere, Postdoctoral Fellow, Weather Center for International Affairs 
Andrew F. March, Berggruen Fellow, Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics
Tarek Masoud, Sultan of Oman Professor of International Relations, Harvard Kennedy School of Government
Roy P. Mottahedeh, Gurney Research Professor of History, Emeritus

Please join the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Islamic Studies Program and the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation for a cross-disciplinary panel discussion on the intersection of Islam and democracy across the Muslim world. Refreshments will be provided. 

Hosted by the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Islamic Studies Program and the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation. 

Open to the Harvard community. 

 

 

 

Oct
24
Tue
Lecture/Panel

Poland at the Crossroads Between Authoritarianism and Democracy

4:15PM to 6:00PM
Adolphus Busch Hall, 27 Kirkland Street at Cabot Way Cambridge, MA

Chair:
Grzegorz Ekiert, Laurence A. Tisch Professor of Government, Harvard University; Director, CES, Harvard University; Resident Faculty, CES; Chair, Director's Seminar

Speakers:
Jan Kubik, Professor of Political Science, Rutgers University; Professor of Slavonic and East European Studies, UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies University College London
Monika Nalepa, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Chicago
Karolina Wigura, Assistant Professor, Institute of Sociology, Warsaw University
Brian Porter-Szűcs, Professor of History, University of Michigan

This event will focus on the political changes in Poland, as part of the CES Director's Seminar. 

Hosted by the Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies. 

Free and open to the public.

 

Oct
24
Tue
Lecture/Panel

New Trends in the Arts of Spain

5:00PM to 6:00PM
Conference Room, Real Colegio Complutense, 26 Trowbridge Street Cambridge, MA

Speaker: 
Francisco Prado-Vilar, RCC Fellow, Visiting Scholar at the Department of Romance Languages & Literatures, Harvard University Faculty of Arts and Sciences

On October 5, 2016, stonemasons working in a small chamber at the base of the south tower on the west façade of the cathedral of Santiago unearthed a monumental column statue, whose iconographic identification as the Prophet Zechariah, originally belonging to the dismantled exterior façade of Master Mateo’s famous Portal of Glory, was presented at the RCC for the first time in the lecture “Fragmentation and the Limits of Iconography”, in anticipation of its publication in the forthcoming book The Portal of Glory: Architecture, Matter, and Vision (Fundación Barrié/Andrew W. Mellon Foundation) which contains the first complete reconstruction of the façade of the Portal of Glory with the restitution of all its dispersed masterpieces to their original locations. 

On November 6, 2016, a month after this first discovery, as workers were tearing down a wall made of irregular rubble, which was blocking entrance to the same chamber, they discovered another mutilated sculpture that had been reused as construction material. On stylistic grounds, this smaller figure can be assigned to the workshop of the Master of the Damped Folds (ca. 1170), so called because of his use of the classical motif of drapery that attaches to the skin to reveal the interior anatomy of the figures and animate them with vibrant light surface effects. In this lecture, Prado-Vilar will advance a hypothesis for the identification of this sculpture as the angel Gabriel, which once formed part of a group of the Annunciation alongside a figure of the Virgin by the same workshop also preserved in the cathedral of Santiago.

Now coming to life from the abyss of its own material disappearance, this magnificent work of art demonstrates that the past is indeed “alive” and it is essential for the construction of our modern collective memory. Visitors to Madrid will have the chance to see it as part of the exhibition commemorating the 150 years of the establishment of the National Archaeological Museum “The Power of the Past”, which opened on October 11, 2017.

This event is hosted by Real Colegio Complutense, and is open to the Harvard community.

Oct
24
Tue
Lecture/Panel

Responsibility to Others: Victim Protection and Transitional Justice in El Salvador

5:30PM to 7:00PM
Andover Hall Room 103, 45 Francis Avenue Cambridge, MA

Speaker:
Noah Bullock, Executive Director, Cristosal

Responsibility to others is a common value across religious traditions and the basis of the international human rights system. We are living in an historic moment in which governments are retreating from commitments to protect and promote the rights of the most vulnerable, including refugees and migrants. In response, individuals and communities around the world are taking action to reaffirm a commitment to basic human rights principles and preserve the gains made by previous generations.

Join us for a discussion with Noah Bullock, executive director of Cristosal, a human rights organization based in El Salvador. Bullock will discuss Cristosal’s work on behalf of victims of contemporary and historic human rights violations in the region and strategies for establishing a human rights climate in which peacemaking is possible.

Hosted by Harvard Divinity School Office of Ministry Studies; Religions and the Practice of Peace Initiative.

This event is open to the Harvard community.

Oct
24
Tue
Lecture/Panel

CHINA Town Hall: Local Connections, National Reflections with Ambassador Susan Rice and Jeremy Goldkorn

6:00PM to 8:00PM
CGIS Knafel K262, 1737 Cambridge Street Cambridge MA

Join 80+ communities across the United States in a national conversation on China.Featuring an interactive webcast with former UN Ambassador Susan Rice, and on-site discussion with Jeremy Goldkorn.

Ambassador Susan E. Rice served President Barack Obama as national security advisor and U.S. permanent representative to the United Nations. In her role as national security advisor from July 1, 2013, to January 20, 2017, Ambassador Rice led the National Security Council staff and chaired the Cabinet-level National Security Principals Committee. She provided the President daily national security briefings and was responsible for coordinating the formulation and implementation of all aspects of the Administration’s foreign and national security policy, intelligence, and military efforts.

As U.S. permanent representative to the United Nations (UN) and a member of President Obama’s cabinet, Ambassador Rice worked to advance U.S. interests, defend universal values, strengthen the world’s security and prosperity, and promote respect for human rights. In a world of 21st century threats that pay no heed to borders, Ambassador Rice helped rebuild an effective basis for international cooperation that strengthened the United States’ ability to achieve its foreign policy objectives and made the American people safer.

_____

Jeremy Goldkorn is the founder and director of Danwei, a research firm that tracks Chinese media, markets, politics and business. The company started in 2003 as a blog that the The London Review of Books said gave “a range of sources, news and opinions on China that no mainstream news organisation can match.” Danwei began offering research services to companies and financial institutions in 2006. The Financial Times acquired Danwei in 2013, after which Goldkorn also took charge of the custom research services of FT Confidential China, Latin America, and ASEAN services.

Hosted by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, in conjunction with the National Committee on U.S. China Relations

Oct
24
Tue
Performance

International Comedy Night

7:00PM to 9:00PM
Radcliffe Gym/Knafel Center, 18 Mason Street Cambridge MA

Featuring:
Comedian Nemr, and the Harvard College Stand Up Comic Society

Join us for a dose of international-themed humor with Comedian NEMR and the HARVARD COLLEGE STAND-UP COMIC SOCIETY. Nemr is a Lebanese/American comedian who is credited with establishing and pioneering the standup comedy scene throughout the Middle East. His latest tour was met with unprecedented success, selling out prestigious venues such as Caroline’s in New York, the Wilbur Theatre in Boston, and the Novo in Los Angeles, making his tour the first global comedy event to successfully stretch from the United States to the Middle East. Breaking down cultural barriers with hilarity and sharp insight is Nemr’s signature comedic style.

Hosted by the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs.

No tickets are required.

Open to the Harvard community.

 

Wednesday 25th

Oct
25
Wed
Lecture/Panel

Jomon Food Diversity, Climate Change and Long-term Sustainability: Lessons from Prehistoric Japan

12:00PM to 1:00PM
Tozzer Anthropology Building Room 203, 21 Divinity Avenue Cambridge, MA

Speaker:
Junko Habu, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of California-Berkeley

Archaeologists have long been interested in the study of long-term social change. Factors that involve specialization and centralization have been proposed as prime movers for the “development” of human societies. Contrary to these interpretations, I propose a hypothesis that diversity and decentralization may be critical for maintaining long-term sustainability of human societies. Using a case study from the Early and Middle Jomon periods (ca. 4000-2400 BC) of prehistoric Japan, this presentation emphasizes the importance of framing recent and current global environmental problems in the context of the greater human experiences.

Hosted by Department of Anthropology, Harvard University Faculty of Arts and Sciences, as part of the Harvard Archaeology Seminar Series.  

 

 

Oct
25
Wed
Lecture/Panel

Asia's Reckoning: China, Japan, and the Fate of U.S. Power in the Pacific Century

12:30PM to 2:00PM
Belfer Case Study Room, CGIS South S020, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

Moderator:
Ezra F. Vogel, Henry Ford II Professor of the Social Sciences, Emeritus

Speaker: 
Richard McGregor, author of Asia’s Reckoning: China, Japan, and the Fate of U.S. Power in the Pacific Century and The Party: The Secret World of China’s Communist Rulers;  former Washington and Beijing Bureau Chief for The Financial Times

Hosted by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies.

 

Oct
25
Wed
Seminar

Postponed: The Challenge of Protecting Refugee Youth in Cities

1:00PM to 2:00PM
FXB 710, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 651 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115

THIS EVENT IS CANCELED AND WILL BE RESCHEDULED AT A LATER DATE. Sorry for the inconvenience!

Elizabeth Donger is a research associate at Harvard FXB and the project lead for two recently completed studies for the UNHCR. These mixed method studies comprehensively evaluate the health and wellbeing of adolescent refugees living in urban areas in Ecuador and in Zambia, and the protection system established to support them. Two very different contexts illustrate widely relevant best practices and challenges for humanitarian and development actors in serving this growing population.

This Work-in-Progress discussion will involve a presentation of findings, and collaborative discussion with other refugee youth researchers and advocates around what the next stage of this project could look like.

Hosted by the FXB Center for Health and Human Rights. 

Open to the Harvard community. Space is limited.

Oct
25
Wed
Lecture/Panel

The Future of Cities

3:30PM to 5:30PM
Askwith Lecture Room, Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way Cambridge, MA

~~LARGE VENUE EVENT~~

Please join President Drew Faust and a panel of experts in a conversation about the future of cities.

Moderator:
John Macomber, Senior Lecturer, Harvard Business School

Panelists:
Diane Davis, Chair, Department of Urban Planning and Design, Harvard Graduate School of Design
John Fernandez, Professor, MIT; Urban Metabolism Group, African Urban Metabolism Network
Christian Irmisch, Principal, Siemens AG, Mobility Division
Stefan Knupfer, Senior Partner, McKinsey & Company; Leader, Sustainability Resource Productivity Practice
Anand Mahindra, Chairman, Mahindra Group
Efosa Ojomo, Research Fellow, Clayton Christensen Institute for Disruptive Innovation
Harriet Tregoning, Former Deputy Assistant Secretary, Office of Planning and Development, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

What will the city of the future look like? How will contemporary urbanization challenges establish the groundwork for the next generation of innovations? Who will spearhead the investments and institutional arrangements needed to address such issues as sprawl, climate change, socio-spatial inequality, and rapid technological change? This panel showcases a range of experts, innovators, and thought leaders in the fields of technology, infrastructure, and governance of cities. Drawing on experience from Africa, Latin America, Asia, Europe, and the U.S., panelists will share their views on how best to address the fact that more than 70% of the world’s population is projected to be living in cities by the year 2050 (with close to 90% of the increase coming from Asia and Africa). Debate will revolve around the impacts of intensified urban growth on the basic political, economic, and social arrangements that have come to define cities, as well as on the role of new technologies and infrastructures in modifying urban footprints and quality of life.

Co-hosted by Harvard Business School Global Initiative and Harvard Graduate School of Design.

Free and open to the public.

Oct
25
Wed
Lecture/Panel

The Future of Work and Welfare – A German Perspective

4:15PM to 6:00PM
27 Kirkland Street at Cabot Way, Adolphus Busch Hall, Cambridge, MA

Max Neufeind of the German Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs will lay out how major stakeholders in Germany are currently discussing the digital transformation, and particularly its effects on the labor market and the welfare system. He will then present the structure and key findings of a comprehensive dialogue process on the future of work and welfare, initiated by the German Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs. He will elaborate on specific challenges Germany faces based on its institutional set-up, vis-à-vis other varieties of capitalism. He concludes by describing policy options currently being discussed within the German government and public sphere, and will offer more general suggestions on how to reform the “German model” to adapt it to the digital age.

Open to the Harvard community. 

Hosted by the Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies at Harvard University. 

Oct
25
Wed
Performance

Middle East Film Series: "As I Open My Eyes" (Tunisia, 2015)

6:00PM
Starr Auditorium, Kennedy School of Government, 79 JFK Street Cambridge, MA

Join us for a screening of As I Open My Eyes (Tunisia, 2015), directed by Layla Bouzid. RSVP requested, but not required (will open October 12, 2017). Pizza and soft drinks will be served.

Synopsis
As I Open My Eyes gives us a look at Tunisian youth on the eve of the Jasmine Revolution as they are pulled in all directions by conflicting forces: disenchantment, fear, creativity, rebellion against dictatorship, rejection of conservatism, and the courage to pursue their desires.

Farah (Baya Medhaffar) is a young woman at a crossroads. Her medical-school application has just been accepted, and nothing could please her mother, Hayet (Ghalia Benali), more — but Farah's passion is for music, and her underground band is just beginning to get noticed. Their music blends rock with daring lyrics that have the raw poetry of spoken word. Soon enough, the police are alerted to the band's subversive performances and begin to harass them, and when Farah is detained and interrogated, she realizes that one of her friends is a snitch.

The story was inspired by director Leyla Bouzid's personal experience: during Ben Ali's dictatorship, she and her friends ran a cine-club, one of whose members was discovered to be a secret-police informant.

Bouzid's behind-the-camera talent is complemented by Iraqi musician Khyam Allami's compositions and Ghassen Amami's hard-hitting lyrics, and by the engaging, truthful performances of the cast — particularly Medhaffar, a joy to watch on stage as the fiery Farah, sharing a marvelous onscreen chemistry with celebrated singer-performer Benali.

[Synopsis courtesy of the Toronto International Film Festival]

Thursday 26th

Oct
26
Thu
Seminar

Art as Research: A Transatlantic Dialogue

8:30AM to 5:30PM
Carpenter Center B04, 19 Prescott Street Cambridge, MA

Under the auspices of the Harvard University Committee on the Arts and the Division of Arts and Humanities, a delegation of students and faculty from PSL (Paris Sciences et Lettres) will be visiting Harvard for a day of conversations on the integration of graduate study in the arts with the scholarly pursuits of a research university. Much of the day will be devoted to presentations by students from the PSL SACRe doctorate program and from the Critical Media Practice secondary field at Harvard. The remainder of the program will be devoted to broad remarks and exchanges about how best to approach the development or refinement of innovative graduate programs in the arts. The hope is that these exchanges will help us envision and pursue new initiatives. This is an open event and any interested colleagues or students are welcome to attend all or portions of the day's events. Breakfast, lunch and refreshments will be available for attendees.

Email the Office of the FAS Dean of Arts and Humanties with any questions: arts-hum@fas.harved.edu

Hosted by the Harvard University Committee on the Arts, FAS Division of Arts and Humanities and Paris Sciences et Lettres SACRe doctorate program.

Oct
26
Thu
Lecture/Panel

Health and Aging in Africa: Early Results from a Longitudinal Study

12:00PM to 1:30PM
9 Bow Street, Cambridge MA

Presenters:
Lisa Berkman, PhD, director, Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies and Thomas D. Cabot Professor of Public Policy, Epidemiology, and Global Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health;
David Canning, PhD, Richard Saltonstall Professor of Population Sciences and Professor of Economics and International Health, the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Livia Montana, PhD, Director of Research, Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies.

In 2013, the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies launched Health and Aging in Africa: A Longitudinal Study of an INDEPTH Community in South Africa (HAALSI), the first Health and Retirement (HRS) sister study in Africa. The project is led by an interdisciplinary team of collaborators from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, University of Witwatersrand in South Africa, and The INDEPTH Network, a global network of health and demographic surveillance systems. The project aims to identify the biological, social, and economic conditions that shape health in the aging population of Agincourt, South Africa. Major themes include: dementia and cognitive impairment, HIV, cardiometabolic risks and disease, and public policies.

Join us on October 26, 2017, when HAALSI researchers will describe the significance of the study, the survey and testing methodologies, early results, and how the data harmonizes with HRS studies in the U.S., India, China, Mexico, and Europe. Lunch will be served.

Hosted by the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Oct
26
Thu
Information Session/Networking

Student Lunch with Dr. Christian Happi

12:30PM to 1:45PM
3rd Floor Seminar Room, Center for African Studies, 1280 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA

Guest:
Dr. Christian Happi, Professor of Molecular Biology and Genomics, Director of the African Center of Excellence for Genomics of Infectious Diseases, and Director of the Directorate of Research Innovations and Partnerships at Redeemer’s University in Nigeria.

Dr. Happi's research focuses on human genomics, molecular biology, and genomics of infectious diseases, especially malaria, viral hemorrhagic fevers, and HIV. His laboratory confirmed the first case of Ebola virus disease in Nigeria in the 2014 outbreak.

Students must register here. This lunch is held in association with the Radcliffe science symposium, "Contagion: Exploring Modern Epidemic" on Friday, October 27th.

Hosted by the Center for African Studies and Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

 

Oct
26
Thu
Social

Humanitarian Academy at Harvard Five-Year Anniversary

1:00PM to 2:00PM
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Building 1, 12th Floor Conference Room, 665 Huntington Avenue Boston, MA

Conversation with faculty and staff from Humanitarian at Harvard Academy, with information for students to become involved.

About HAH: The Humanitarian Academy is dedicated to educating and training current and future generations of humanitarian leaders. We aim to create a professional pathway for students and practitioners of all levels in the humanitarian space and to serve as a prototype for other academic centers of excellence in humanitarian education.

Hosted by Harvard Humanitarian Initiative. 

Oct
26
Thu
Lecture/Panel

The New Era of Epidemics: Surveillance, Response, Impacts, and Challenges

1:00PM to 4:00PM
Bray Room, Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur Boston, MA

Moderator:
Marc Lipsitch, DPhil, Professor of Epidemiology, Departments of Epidemiology and Immunology and Infectious Diseases; Director, Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics, and Associate Director of the Interdisciplinary Concentration in Infectious Diseases Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Speakers:
Marcia Castro, PhD, Associate Professor of Demography, Department of Population and Global Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Celina M. Turchi, PhD, Researcher, Fundaçāo Olswaldo Cruz (Fiocruz)
C. Jessica Metcalf, PhD, Assistant Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Public Affairs, Departments of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University
Anne Rimoin, MPH, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of California at Los Angeles
Pardis Sabeti, MD, PhD, Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at the Center for Systems Biology and Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University and the Department of Immunology and Infectious Disease at the Harvard School of Public Health.

In the new era of epidemics, emergent infectious disease challenges are often superimposed on a background of other public health problems and scarce health care services. A panel of global health experts will explore lessons learned from recent infectious disease outbreaks and discuss ways to prepare for the next public health crisis.

Hosted by Harvard's Defeating Malaria: From the Genes to the Globe Initiative & the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies. 

Open to the Harvard community. RSVP to

to register for the event. 

Oct
26
Thu
Seminar

Firming Up Inequality

2:00PM to 3:15PM
Cotting Hall, Conference Room 107, Harvard Business School

Speaker:
Professor Nicholas Bloom, William Eberle Professor of Economics, Stanford University

In this event, part of the Harvard Business School's International Seminar Series, Professor Nick Bloom dicusses the role that corporations have played in rising income inequality during the last 40 years.

Abstract: We use a massive, new, matched employer-employee database for the United States to analyze the contribution of firms to the rise in earnings inequality from 1978 to 2013. We find that one-third of the rise in the variance of (log) earnings occurred within firms, whereas two-thirds of the rise occurred between firms. However, this rising between-firm variance is not accounted for by the firms themselves: the firm-related rise in the variance can be decomposed into two roughly equally important forces—a rise in the assortative matching of high-wage workers to high-wage firms and a rise in segregation of similar workers between firms. In contrast, we do not find a rise in the variance of firm-specific pay once we control for worker composition. Instead, we see a substantial rise in dispersion of person-specific pay, accounting for 77% of rising inequality, potentially due to rising returns to skill. The rise in between-firm variance due to worker sorting and segregation accounted for a particularly large share of the total increase in inequality in smaller and medium firms (explaining 84% for firms with fewer than 10,000 employees). In contrast, in the very largest firms with 10,000+ employees, almost half of the increase in the variance of earnings took place within firms, driven by both declines in earnings for employees below the median and a substantial rise in earnings for the 10% best-paid employees. However, because of their small number, the contribution of these very top earners to the overall increase in within-firm earnings inequality is small.

Hosted by the Harvard Business School.

Please RSVP to Domenique Ciavattone.

Oct
26
Thu
Lecture/Panel

French Foreign Policy Under President Macron

2:15PM to 4:00PM
Adolphus Busch Hall, 27 Kirkland Street at Cabot Way Cambridge, MA

Speaker:
H.E. Gérard Araud, Ambassador of France to the United States, will discuss French foreign policy under the presidency of Emmanuel Macron. 

Discussant:
Peter A. Hall, Krupp Foundation Professor of European Studies, Department of Government, Harvard Univeristy. 

Chair:
Mary D. Lewis, Robert Walton Goelet Professor of French History, Harvard University. 

Hosted by the Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies. 

Free and open to the public.

Oct
26
Thu
Seminar

Coming Home? The Dilemmas of Political Settlement(s) and Refugee Return in Syria

4:00PM to 5:30PM
Taubman Building, Nye A, 5th Floor

A seminar with Maha Yahya, Director of Carnegie Middle East Center, Beirut. Part of the Middle East Initiative Speaker Series. 

Hosted by the Middle East Initiative, Harvard Kennedy School. 

Free and open to the public. 

Oct
26
Thu
Seminar

Design in Spain: The Production of Public Space

4:00PM to 5:00PM
Conference Room, Real Colegio Complutense, 26 Trowbridge Street Cambridge, MA

Speakers:
Francisco Alarcon, RCC Fellow, MDes Art, Design and the Public Domain at the Graduate School of Design; 
Eduardo Martínez-Medeiro Rubio, RCC Fellow, Master Candidate in Architecture at Harvard Graduate School of Design; 
Natalia Escobar Castrillon, RCC Fellow, PhD Candidate in Architecture and Conservation Theory at Harvard University; 
Ramon Gras Alomà, RCC Fellow, Master Candidate in Design Engineering Candidate at Harvard;
Karen Mata, Master of Architecture in Urban Design Candidate at Harvard Graduate School of Design

This conference at Real Colegio Complutense will focus on the physical public space and its production. Spanish designers from the Graduate School of Design will present the latest projects from their practice in the public realm. 

Public Space comes in different forms: publicy owned parks, streets, sidewalks, privately owned public spaces, privately managed public parks, and temporary spaces. The production of public space implies a larger technical implication from design aspects, management and financing. In this conference, those topics will be discussed with an engaged audience. Daniel will present Ways of Wood: Expressing Material Flows, installation located on the Kennedy Rose Garden. The projects aims to create a link with North American landscapes of industrial extraction. Francisco will lay out the newly inaugurated installation WE ALL: the first built project to occupy a newly expanded section of the Grove, a site at the intersection of North Harvard Street and Western Avenue that serves as an entry point from Cambridge into Allston.

This event is hosted by Real Colegio Complutense, and is open to the Harvard community.

Oct
26
Thu
Lecture/Panel

Populism in Germany: Alternative für Deutschland

4:15PM to 5:45PM
Kennedy School of Government, Taubman Building, Nye B, 5th Floor

Join the Future of Diplomacy Project Executive Director Cathryn Cluver Ashbrook in a conversation with Paris Sciences Lettres Vice President Edouard Husson as he discusses There Is No Alternative: Was the rise of populism in Germany favored by Angela Merkel's favorite formula?

This seminar is free, and open to the public.
Hosted by the Future of Diplomacy Project of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. 

Oct
26
Thu
Lecture/Panel

Global Health and the Future Role of the United States

4:30PM to 6:00PM
Kresge Cafeteria, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts

~~LARGE VENUE EVENT~~

Remarks by Mark C. Elliott, Vice Provost for International Affairs and Michelle Williams, Dean of the Faculty, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Keynote by Michael Merson, Duke Global Health Institute

Speakers:
Lisa Berkman, Thomas D. Cabot Professor of Public Policy and of Epidemiology and Director of PhD Program in Population Health Sciences
Karen Emmons, Dean for Academic Affairs, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Paul Farmer, Kolokotrones University Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine
Wafaie Fawzi, Richard Saltonstall Professor of Population Sciences, and Professor of Nutrition, Epidemiology, and Global Health
Ashish K. Jha, K.T. Li Professor of Global Health at Harvard University, Senior Associate Dean for Research Translation and Global Strategy at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the Director of the Harvard Global Health Institute

Hosted by the Department of Global Health and Population at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Open to the Harvard community. 

Oct
26
Thu
Lecture/Panel

What Was Different from Former Uprisings?: Candlelight Demonstrations in 2016 and 2017 | Kim Koo Forum on Korea Current Affairs

4:30PM to 6:00PM
CGIS South Building S050, 1730 Cambridge Street Cambridge, MA

Speaker:
Tae Gyun Park, Kim Koo Visiting Professor in East Asian Languages and Civilizations, 2017-18, Harvard University; Professor, Graduate School of International Studies, Seoul National University

Chair:
Carter J. Eckert, Yoon Se Young Professor of Korean History, Harvard University

Abstract:
There have been three uprisings to change governments in South Korea since 1945. Although the three have a lot in common, there are critical differences between those before 2000 and after 2000. I would like to examine the commonality and distinction through comparison of uprisings in 1960, 1987, and 2016-2017, which has brought same and different results. The analysis would be on not only from the viewpoint of civil society, but also from the conservative group.

Hosted by the Korea Institute.

This event is open to the Harvard community.

Oct
26
Thu
Lecture/Panel

The Early Zaytuna: The Mosque of a Rebellious City

5:00PM to 6:30PM
Center for Middle Easter Studies room 102, 38 Kirkland Street Cambridge MA

Speaker:
Sihem Lamine, Architect; Administrative Manager, CMES Tunisia Office

The Center for Middle Eastern Studies presents Tunisian architect, Sihem Lamine, who will speak on early Islamic architecture in the Maghreb. Ms. Lamine trained at ESA, Paris, and holds an MA degree in History of Islamic Architecture from SOAS, London. She is the Administrative Manager of the CMES Tunisia Office.

Hosted by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Oct
26
Thu
Social

All Harvard Africa Mixer

6:00PM to 8:00PM
CGIS South Concourse, 1737 Cambridge Street Cambridge, MA

This is a fun event to engage students and faculty across Harvard and the Harvard Africanist community. Student group leaders have the opportunity to reach out to a broader student audience to network as well as spell out their activities for the semester. Enjoy delicious food and lively music!

Friday 27th

Oct
27
Fri
Lecture/Panel

Contagion: Exploring Modern Epidemics

9:00AM to 5:00PM
Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street Cambridge, MA

Epidemic disease spreads quickly in our interconnected, globalized world. This symposium looks at new ways of tracking epidemics using big data and social networks to predict and stem the rise of emergent diseases.

From Ebola and SARS to the more recently recognized social epidemics of the opioid crisis and gun violence, this event assembles epidemiologists, journalists, physicians, public officials, scientists, and sociologists to discuss their cutting-edge research, prediction mechanisms, and possible solutions to the range of epidemics that face our world today.

Hosted by the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.  

Free and open to the public. Please register online.

Oct
27
Fri

Harvard Law School in the World: Session Live Streams

9:00AM to 5:30PM
Live streaming online

In this gathering of leading lawyers, we will ask and address hard questions about the contributions of law and legal education in tackling crucial issues of justice and human welfare in local communities, the U.S., and around the world. Faculty, students, and alumni will join in small, faculty-led sessions addressing issues in legal education, the legal profession, law, and society. Through debate, dialogue, storytelling, and informal conversations, our community will delve deeply into questions that reveal why law matters more than ever.

Available online worldwide via live stream:

Session One: 9:00am-10:30am    HLS Alumni Leaders of the In-House Revolution: A Conversation | The Office of Legal Counsel and the Challenge of Legal Advice to the President

Session Two: 11:00am-12:30pm    The Remarkable Evolution of American Environmental Law from Nixon to Trump and Beyond | National Security, Privacy, and the Rule of Law

Session Three: 2:00pm-3:30pm     Samantha Power and Harold Koh | Leadersip in America: A Conversation with U.S. Senators

Session Four: 4:00pm-5:30pm     Marbury vs. Madison | Loretta Lynch and Annette Gordon-Reed

Part of Harvard Law School Bicentennial 1817-2017

Hosted by Harvard Law School

Oct
27
Fri
Exhibit

Cooper Gallery After Hours

10:00AM to 7:00PM
The Ethelbert Cooper Gallery of African & African American Art, 102 Mount Auburn Street Cambridge, MA

The Cooper Gallery offers evening hours until 7:00PM on Friday, October 27th to celebrate the last day of Worldwide Week at Harvard. This will give visitors the chance to explore our Fall 2017 Exhibition "Wole Soyinka: Antiquities Across Times and Place". Internationally acclaimed dramatist, social critic, and Nobel laureate, Wole Soyinka is an avid collector of African artworks including those from his home country, Nigeria. The Cooper Gallery will feature several of these works in an exhibition curated by New York University professor Awam Amkpa. We place this collection, including masks, head-dresses, dolls, busts, vessels, and weapons made in wood, brass and other media, in conversation with contemporary artworks by: Peju Alatise, Moyo Okediji, Olu Amoda, Chris Abani and Peter Badejo. 

Hosted by the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research.

Free and open to the public. 

Oct
27
Fri
Lecture/Panel

"Nation Building: Why Some Countries Come Together While Others Fall Apart" | Workshop on Culture, History and Society

12:00PM to 2:00PM
William James Hall Room 1550, 33 Kirkland Street Cambridge, MA

Speaker: 
Andreas Wimmer, Lieber Professor of Sociology and Political Philosophy, Columbia University

Chairs: 
Orlando Patterson, Faculty Associate. John Cowles Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology, Harvard University
Daniel Lord Smail, Frank B. Baird, Jr. Professor of History, Department of History, Harvard University
Ya-Wen Lei, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology, Harvard University

Hosted by the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, the Department of Economics, Harvard University, and the Department of Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Oct
27
Fri
Lecture/Panel

Askwith Forum: Learning to Change the World

12:00PM to 1:30PM
Longfellow Hall, HGSE, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge, Massachusetts

~~LARGE VENUE EVENT~~

Moderator:
Fernando Reimers, Ed.M. '84, Ed.D. '88, Ford Foundation Professor of Practice in International Education and Director of the International Education Policy Program and of the Global Education Innovation Initiative, HGSE

Speakers:
Felipe Barrera-Osorio, Associate Professor of Education and Economics, HGSE
Sarah Dryden-Peterson, Ed.D.’09, Associate Professor of Education, HGSE
Dana McCoy, Assistant Professor of Education, HGSE

HGSE faculty will join Professor Fernando Reimers for a showcase of their global research and how it advances the school’s mission.

Hosted by Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Oct
27
Fri
Lecture/Panel

An Alternate View of the North Korea-U.S. Relationship

12:15PM to 2:00PM
S010, Tsai Auditorium, CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge Street Cambridge, MA

Seminar Series: Asia Beyond the Headlines

 

The Honorable Donald P. Gregg, Former Ambassador to the Republic of Korea; former National Security Advisor, former CIA officer; Chairman; Pacific Century Institute, Los Angeles; Chairman Emeritus, The Korea Society, New York City

Discussants:
Professor Katharine Moon, Professor of Political Science and the Wasserman Chair of Asian Studies, Wellesley College; nonresident Senior Fellow, Center for East Asia Policy, The Brookings Institution

Dr. John Park, Director, Korea Working Group and Adjunct Lecturer, Harvard Kennedy School (HKS); Faculty Affiliate, Project on Managing the Atom, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, HKS

Chair:
Professor Karen Thornber, Victor and William Fung Director, Harvard University Asia Center; Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations and of Comparative Literature, Harvard University

Open to the Harvard community.
Hosted by Harvard University Asia Center and Korea Institute

Oct
27
Fri
Seminar

Women's Suffrage and Intergenerational Mobility | Economic History Workshop

2:00PM to 3:30PM
Littauer Center M16, 1805 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA

Speaker:
James Feigenbaum, Assistant Professor of Economics , Department of Economics, Boston University.

Chairs:
Eric Chaney, Faculty Associate. Assistant Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, Harvard University.
Melissa Dell, Faculty Associate. Assistant Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, Harvard University.
Claudia Goldin, Henry Lee Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, Harvard University.
Nathan Nunn, Executive Committee; Faculty Associate. Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, Harvard University.

The Economic History Workshop is an interdisciplinary offering of the Department of Economics. In continuous operation for about fifty years, the workshop has become an exceptionally important forum for economic historians in the greater Boston area, serving as a lively and deeply informative seminar for those interested in long-term economic change, economic growth, and development. 

Hosted by the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs. 

Free and open to the public. 

Oct
27
Fri
Performance

Author Readings from Transition Magazine

3:00PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Harvard Book Store is pleased to host an afternoon with Transition magazine, featuring issues 123 "Fear" and 124 "Writing Black Canadas." This event includes a book signing.

Event Presenters

Issue 124:
Phanuel Antwi  (Guest Editor)
David Chariandy (Guest Editor)
Sarah Ladipo Manyika (novelist, contributor)

Issue 05/123 (collaborative issue with Jalada Africa):
Moses Kilolo (Managing Assistant, Jalada)
Danielle Legros Georges (poet, contributor)
Enzo Silon Surin (poet, contributor)
Novuyo Rosa Tshuma (Managing Editor, Jalada)

About Jalada 05 / Transition 123

Through fortuitous meeting in Kampala at the 2015 Writivism Festival, Transition and Jalada have joined forces to present this issue on the theme of Fear. Contributors were asked to reflect on our phobias, the things that make us human or, indeed, inhuman. Our fears, and the dance between fear and fearlessness, can shape how we live and how we conceptualize ourselves and others.

About Transition 124

In this year marking the 150th anniversary of Canadian confederation, Transition celebrates over four hundred years of Black presence in Canada.

In issue 124, “Writing Black Canadas,” we highlight Rinaldo Walcott’s observation that “Black Canada is not one thing. It’s multiple moments of Blackness. It’s multiple relations to the nation space. It’s multiple points of arrival. It’s a set of different histories.” Guest editors Phanuel Antwi and David Chariandy present glimpses of a robust living archive of Black Canadian writing, highlighting critical thought, cultural memory, formal innovation, and radical intimacy that channels the global sweep of the diaspora. Contributors include Dionne Brand, George Elliott Clarke, Afua Cooper, Juliane Okot Bitek, Ian Williams, Wayde Compton, H. Nigel Thomas, M. NourbeSe Philip, and cover artist Sandra Brewster.

Profiles of two formidable women of letters—Toni Morrison and Toi Derricotte—round out the issue, while works of short fiction by Olufunke Ogundimu and Christian Ojochegbe Jacob speak again to the theme of Fear. In this issue, we also honor the memory of F. Abiola Irele—former Transition editor and renowned scholar of francophone African and Caribbean literature—with tributes from colleagues and admirers.

Hosted by Transition Magazine, Hutchins Center for African and African American Research, and Harvard Book Store.

Oct
27
Fri
Lecture/Panel

The Dilemma of Bad Karma: Prison Chaplains and the Japanese Correctional System

4:00PM to 5:30PM
Porté Seminar Room S250, CGIS South Building 1730 Cambridge Street Cambridge, MA

Speaker:
Adam Lyons, Reischauer Institute Postdoctoral Fellow (Ph.D. Harvard University, 2017, Religion) 

Moderator:
Helen Hardacre, Reischauer Institute Professor of Japanese Religions and Society, Harvard University

Hosted by the Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies. 

Oct
27
Fri
Lecture/Panel

Spanish Public Innovation

4:30PM to 6:00PM
26 Trowbridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Spain is a country under the continental-European socio-administrative framework with a vertical distribution of competences typical from a centralized State which provides powers to self-governing regions and a significant role to the cities in managing the public space. Therefore, the role of the public administrations is vital for the economic and political life in the country. Despite the fact that some of the roles of the Public Administration are developed under the framework of their own competences and the Public Administration management, this reality is connected to some innovation components at different levels. In this panel, young professionals and graduate students, as well as researchers at Harvard Kennedy School will deliver a presentation on some of the most innovative projects that are currently carried out in Spain with a national and international relevance.

Speakers:

Melina Sánchez Montañés, RCC Fellow, Master in Public Policy Candidate at Harvard Kennedy School

Fernando Alvarez-Cienfuegos, RCC Fellow, Master Candidate in Public Administration at Harvard Kennedy School

Borja Gómez Rojo, RCC Fellow, Master Candidate in Public Administration at Harvard Kennedy School

 

Hosted by Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard 

Open to the Harvard community

Oct
27
Fri
Social

Harvard Spain Open Day and Spanish Tapas

6:00PM to 9:00PM
Real Colegio Complutense, 26 Trowbridge Street Cambridge, MA

HARVARD SPAIN Students Association is an association of Spanish students at Harvard University founded in 2014. Harvard Spain is committed to the gathering and coordination of the interests of the Spanish community at Harvard University, the establishment of connections between Harvard University and talent niches in Spain, and the diffusion of Spanish culturenn within the Harvard community at large.

Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard (RCC) is a Spanish center affiliated to Harvard University since 1990, under the presidency of Derek C. Bok. It is the only World Class Excellence Center in the US and has an exclusive relationship with the Ivy League university. RCC is a non-profit organization, aimed at providing academic, scientific, and cultural cooperation between Harvard University and the Spanish system of Higher Education. It promotes and develops activities in every realm of the knowledge triangle

The Open Day is intended to bring together Harvard Community, namely faculty and other Students Associations members for creating and reinforcing already existing bonds with Harvard Spain.

This event is hosted by Harvard Spain Students Association and Real Colegio Complutense; it is open to the Harvard community.

Saturday 28th

Oct
28
Sat
Reception

Internationals of Harvard

4:00PM to 5:30PM
Science Center West Wing, 1 Oxford Street Cambridge, MA

An event that combines internationalism with photography. The event will center around photo displays in a sort of informal gallery. These displays will include highlights from the First-Year International Program (FIP), features the Woodbridge Society "Internationals of Harvard" social media campaign, and an investigative series about photography around the world. There will also be food and refreshments. 

Everyone is welcome to this event! We want all members of the community to feel included: FIPers, non-FIPers, international or domestic students. Importantly, because it is Freshman Family Weekend, we encourage students without visiting family to come to our event to build community, and we welcome students to bring their visiting family members as well! 

This event is hosted by the First-Year International Program, Woodbridge International Society, Harvard International Office and the Freshman Dean's Office. 

Sunday 29th

Oct
29
Sun
Performance

In Between - a one man show written and performed by Ibrahim Miari

1:00PM to 3:00PM
Tsai Auditorium, CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge Street Cambridge, MA

In Between is a semi-autobiographical one-man show that portrays the complexities and contradictions inherent in Palestinian-Israeli identity. On the precipice between two cultures stands Ibrahim Miari. His play recalls his childhood in Acre, memories of his Jewish and Palestinian grandmothers, of war, and of the struggle to shape and understand his own multi-faceted identity.

The event is free and open to the public.

Hosted by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies and the Center for Jewish Studies.

For members of the Harvard community interested to submit an event as part of Worldwide Week, please fill out this form


Large events, open to the public, include:

Sun      22 Oct

   
   
   

International Festival - Food, Dance, Music, and Magic, 2:00-6:00p.m., Science Center Plaza, hosted by Harvard Graduate Council

 

Mon      23 Oct

 

"Women & The Global Health Wokforce," 2:00-5:00p.m., Radcliffe Gymnasium, hosted by Harvard Global Health Institute

 

 

 

Wed          25 Oct

"Are You a Global Citizen? Is That a Good Thing? The Meaning of Global Citizenship," Moderated by NPR's Tom Ashbrook, 7:00-8:30p.m., Science Center B, hosted by the Office of the Vice Provost for International Affairs 

 

"The Future of Cities," 3:30-5:30 pm, Askwith Lecture Room, Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Wayhosted by the Harvard Business School Global Initiative and the Graduate School of Design 

Thurs      26 Oct

 

"Global Health And The Future Role of the United States," 4:30-6:00p.m., Kresge Cafeteria, Kresge Building, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, hosted by the Department of Global Health and Population at Harvard Chan School

 

Fri          27 Oct

Askwith Forum: "Learning to Change the World," 12:00-1:30p.m., Askwith Lecture Room, Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way, hosted by Harvard Graduate School of Education

 

Free Kindle book download for Worldwide Week:

Teaching Two Lessons about UNCESCO and other writings on Human Rights by Fernando M. Reimers, Ford Foundation Professor of the Practice in International Education, available for free Kindle download during Worldwide Week.

 

 

 

 

 

Open Access Week and Worldwide Week Merge:

This week, Harvard merges two celebrations: Open Access Week, led by the Harvard Library Office for Scholarly Communication, and Worldwide Week. Open Access Week is marked by an international series of events highlighting open access to research, and promoting it as the new default. Scholarly works in DASH (Digital Access to Scholarship at Harvard), Harvard's open-access repository, are freely available to anyone with an internet connection, and have been downloaded more than 13 million times by users from every country on Earth.