Worldwide Week at Harvard 2021

4 - 8 October 2021

Worldwide Week at Harvard showcases the remarkable breadth of Harvard’s global engagement. During Worldwide Week, Harvard Schools, research centers, departments, and student organizations host academic and cultural events with global or international themes.

 

Professor Uri McMillan presents "Airbrush, Instamatics, and Funk: Art, Pop and New York City's Long 1970s" Wednesday October 6th Noon hosted by Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Studies
October 8 Fifth Annual International Comedy Night featuring Ronny Chieng
An individual with a red scarf and baseball hall appears behind five vertical lines holding a large item overhead.

Worldwide Week Events

Saturday 2nd

Oct
2
Sat
Performance

The Arboretum Experience Pop Up Show: "Initiation: In Love Solidarity"

2:00PM to 4:00PM
Arnold Arboretum, 125 Arborway Boston MA 02130

Dancer, choreographer, scholar, and educator Nailah Randall-Bellinger is in residence at Harvard Dance Center this fall creating a new work, titled Initiation– In Love Solidarity, and engaging the community in the process.

Initiation– In Love Solidarity is a choreographic narrative exploring the embodiment of the Middle Passage, and the resilience and evolving identities of women in the African diaspora. A film component of the work was created at historic sites in New England related to the transatlantic slave trade and emancipation. The imagery of the cowrie shell is present throughout, chosen as an emblem of the transformative identity of the Black female body. The work is an invitation to enter a dialogue on the journey of African diasporic people, as it connects to the whole of humanity, through reflection, reclamation, and regeneration, moving from trauma to resilience in love solidarity. The film and live performance will be presented in various formats alongside discussions this fall. Randall-Bellinger is also visiting Fall ’21 credit courses in Theater, Dance & Media and African & African American Studies, as well as The Hutchins Center for African & African American Research Fellowship Program.

Supported through a commission by the Harvard University Committee on the Arts (HUCA). Additional support from Harvard Radcliffe Institute and the Presidential Initiative on Harvard and the Legacy of Slavery.

Host Organizations: The American Repertory Theater, FAS Office for the Arts, and The Arnold Arboretum.

Monday 4th

Oct
4
Mon
Lecture/Panel

Coping with Extreme Heat: Urban Preparedness for Social and Physical Resilience

1:00PM to 2:00PM
Virtual event; registration required.

The heatwaves and wildfires across Europe and the United States are sobering reminders of the effects of climate change. Cities in Europe are expected to be severely impacted. This seminar will discuss ways in which local governments are creating collaborative solutions to address physical and social resilience in the face of extreme heat, with a particular focus on Athens.

Event Presenters:
Amy Chester (Managing Director, Rebuild By Design),
Eleni Myrivili (Senior Advisor for Resilience and Sustainability, City of Athens),

Moderated by Nicolas Prevelakis (Harvard University, CHS, CES) 

The event will take place online. Register for the Zoom webinar: https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_hyrF62IgQH-VpGiXp7n9oA

Hosted by the European Union Seminar, Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies, Harvard University, and Center for Hellenic Studies in Greece, Harvard University

Oct
4
Mon
Lecture/Panel

Another Cakravartin Ruler?: Feminist History and the History of Buddhism

4:00PM to 5:30PM
Virtual event; registration required.

Northern Wei 北魏 (386–534 CE) Empress Dowager Ling 靈 (d. 529) is commonly regarded as the last independent ruler of her dynasty, which descended into terminal internecine war during her regency. As a ruler, she inherited a deeply divided state. The move of the capital from Pingcheng to Luoyang in 494 created severe economic alienation for the northern peoples who had traditionally supported the rise of the dynasty, just as it made them cultural outsiders to elite politics in the new capital. Although the Empress Dowager exacerbated such geographic and ethnic tensions in her time, what is less known about her is that she also shaped Buddhist modalities of statecraft to legitimate her reign and, seemingly, attempt to manage her difficult empire.

In this talk, I will analyze the Empress Dowager’s program of state Buddhism and argue that like her famous contemporary in the South, Emperor Wu 武 (r. 502–549) of the Liang 梁 (502–557), she, too, positioned herself as a universal Buddhist monarch in medieval China. In so doing, I engage the question of how our understanding of Buddhist history changes when we put women into it and I propose a series of new questions, which, based in the study of women, serve to elevate our understanding of the ways in which Buddhism became a dominant social force in early medieval China.

Event Presenter:
Stephanie Balkwill, Assistant Professor, Buddhist Studies, UCLA

Virtual event; registration required: https://harvard.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJYuc-6vqjkjE9yzodSy0HtBA_edh2R_Xdx3

Hosted by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies. 

Oct
4
Mon
Lecture/Panel

Japan’s Changing Cybersecurity and the Future of U.S.-Japan Relations

8:30PM to 9:30PM
Virtual event; registration required.

Mihoko Matsubara, Chief Cybersecurity Strategist at Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT) and Associate Fellow at the Henry Jackson Society's Asia Studies Centre, will speak on Japan's approaches to cybersecurity, cyberthreats, and cyber intelligence and how these in turn impact the relationship between Japan and the United States. This seminar is part of the Program on U.S.-Japan Relations' Special Series on Japan-U.S. Cooperation in Digital Governance.

Event Presenters:
Mihoko Matsubara, Chief Cybersecurity Strategist, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT);
Christina L. Davis, Director, Program on U.S.-Japan Relations, Harvard University

Zoom registration link: https://harvard.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEude2uqTwtEtaklwd2pSg-dowkm_1DAGty  

Hosted by the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs Program on U.S.- Japan Relations. 

Tuesday 5th

Oct
5
Tue
Lecture/Panel

Disruptions to Educational Opportunity in Latin America: Primary and Secondary Education During Covid-19

9:00AM to 10:15AM
Virtual event; registration required.

Join four scholars of education in Latin America as they discuss the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on educational opportunity and education policy responses in the region. This panel is based on the recently published book Primary and Secondary Education During Covid-19: Disruptions to Educational Opportunity During a Pandemic, the first global comparative study of the pandemic’s impact on education, edited by Fernando Reimers and available as an open access publication.

Event Presenters:

Fernando Reimers, Ford Foundation Professor of the Practice of International Education, Harvard Graduate School of Education;

Cristián Bellei, Associate Researcher, Center for Advanced Research in Education, and Professor of Sociology, University of Chile

Sergio Cárdenas, Professor of Public Administration, CIDE; AntonioMadero-Fundación México en Harvard Visiting Scholar, DRCLAS, Harvard University

Claudia Costin, Founder and Director, Center for Excellence and Innovation in Education Policy, Getulio Vargas Foundation

Virtual event; registration required: https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_WlVIaDhTSh224I36ZFPlFQ

Hosted by the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies Mexico Office

Oct
5
Tue
Lecture/Panel

TUNISIA NEWSREEL, "THE JULY 25TH EXPERIENCE: Transition, Performance or Sentiment? by Ouiem Chattaoui

1:00PM to 2:00PM
Virtual event; registration required.

The Tunisia Office, Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Harvard University presents: “Tunisia Newsreel 2021, Notes from the Ground” a webinar series on post July 25th Tunisia.

Session 1: Ouiem Chettaoui is a public policy specialist. She has primarily focused on security sector governance and public policy communication. With her background as an educator (Professeur Agrégé at the University of El Manar in Tunis), she has focused on pedagogy and training innovation as paths to policy reform. Ouiem has also conducted research on questions of economic justice. She is currently the president of the Observatory for Food Sovereignty and the Environment. Ouiem holds a Master’s degree in Public Policy from Oxford University.

On July 25th, national and international observers dissected President Kais Saied’s actions through the lens of democratic and constitutional conformity. In this talk, Ouiem Chettaoui looks at July 25th as a key moment where opinions on, feelings for and expectations of Tunisian democracy reached a fevered pitch; she discusses how Tunisian democracy (or the attempts to forge and maintain it) is perceived and represented domestically and internationally, and the implications these perceptions have for different interest groups.

Event Presenters:

Ouiem Chattaaoui, Professeur Agrégé at the University of El Manar in Tunis

William Granara, Director of the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Harvard University

Virtual event, registration required: https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_-iX-a-l4RzSYqGwfi8RCtg

Hosted by the Tunisia Office, Center for Middle Eastern Studies. 

Oct
5
Tue
Lecture/Panel

How China Escaped Shock Therapy: The Market Reform Debate

4:00PM to 5:30PM
https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_9Z-gUEMcTVKZbDbAj98Ecg

China has become deeply integrated into the world economy. Yet, gradual marketization has facilitated the country's rise without leading to its wholesale assimilation to global neoliberalism. This book uncovers the fierce contest about economic reforms that shaped China's path. In the first post-Mao decade, China's reformers were sharply divided. They agreed that China had to reform its economic system and move toward more marketization - but struggled over how to go about it. Should China destroy the core of the socialist system through shock therapy, or should it use the institutions of the planned economy as market creators? With hindsight, the historical record proves the high stakes behind the question: China embarked on an economic expansion commonly described as unprecedented in scope and pace, whereas Russia's economy collapsed under shock therapy. Based on extensive research, including interviews with key Chinese and international participants and World Bank officials as well as insights gleaned from unpublished documents, the book charts the debate that ultimately enabled China to follow a path to gradual reindustrialization. Beyond shedding light on the crossroads of the 1980s, it reveals the intellectual foundations of state-market relations in reform-era China through a longue durée lens. Overall, the book delivers an original perspective on China's economic model and its continuing contestations from within and from without.

Event Presenter:
Speaker: Isabella Weber, Assistant Professor of Economics, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Virtual event, registration required: https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_9Z-gUEMcTVKZbDbAj98Ecg

Hosted by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies. 

Wednesday 6th

Oct
6
Wed
Lecture/Panel

India at 75: The Global Roots of Independence

8:00AM to 9:30AM
Virtual event; registration required.

Since independence in 1947, India has played a considerable role in shaping the world. But the world also played a considerable role in shaping Indian independence. As India approaches the 75th anniversary of its freedom, the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute in association with the Harvard Club of India, presents a webinar on how the anti-colonial struggle developed beyond India’s borders, in diaspora settlements and with non-Indian partners. This webinar brings together three scholars—all with previous or current Harvard connections—to examine the overseas careers of Kamaladevi Chattopadhyay, Mahendra Pratap, and J.J. Singh.

Event Presenters:

Dinyar Patel, Assistant Professor, History, SP Jain Institute of Management and Research Affiliate, Mittal South Asia Institute, Harvard University.

Carolien Stolte, Sr. Lecturer in History, Leiden University.

Nico Slate, Professor and Department Head (History), Carnegie MellonUniversity

 

This will be a virtual event; registration required: bit.ly/HWWregister.

Hosted by the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute and the Harvard Club of India. 

Oct
6
Wed
Lecture/Panel

Democratic innovation: The Role of Direct Democracy

9:00AM to 10:30AM
This event is virtual and will be held in Spanish with simultaneous English translation. 10:00 am Chile Time.

The massive protests that rocked Chile beginning in 2019 made it clear that levels of public alienation from the political system had grown dangerously high. A profound gap has emerged between Chilean society and the political elite, as citizens have come to view the political process as elitist and disconnected from social reality. Can mechanisms of direct democracy--such as referenda--help to reduce this gap? As Chileans rewrite their constitution, what kinds of democratic innovation might bring political and policy decision-making closer to citizens? What are the prospects and pitfalls of direct democracy? 

Event Presenters:

Welcoming Remarks: Steve Levitsky, Director, David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies (DRCLAS); Professor of Government, Harvard University. Co-author: How Democracies Die.

Keynote Speakers:
David Altman, Professor of Political Science, Catholic University, Chile; DRCLAS Luksic Visiting Scholar. Author of: Citizenship and Contemporary Direct Democracy.

Yanina Welp, Research Fellow, Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy (Graduate Institute, Geneva) and Editorial Coordinator at Agenda Publica. Co- editor: The Devil is in the Details.

Commentator: Patricio Zapata, Professor of Constitutional Law, Catholic University, Chile; Harvard LL.M. (Master of Laws). Former Candidate to the Constitutional Convention.

Moderator: Claudia Heiss, Professor at Institute of Public Affairs (Instituto de Asuntos Públicos, INAP) Universidad de Chile. Author: Why do We Need a New Constitution?

Virtual event, registration required: https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_kPuoqIyISBG9qRTNxERZSw

Host Organizations: 

Chile Regional Office and Andes & Southern Cone Program, David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, DRCLAS. In collaboration with: Institute of Public Affairs, Universidad de Chile; Instituto Milenio Fundamentos de los Datos;  Constitutional Laboratory, Universidad Diego Portales; School of Law, Universidad Católica; Institute of Political Science, School of History, Geography and Political Science, Universidad Católica; School of Government, Universidad Católica and Harvard Chilean Student Association.  

Co-sponsored by: Luksic Scholar Foundation

 

Oct
6
Wed
Lecture/Panel

What Does U.S. Business Really Want From China?

9:00AM to 10:15AM
Virtual event; registration required.

Part of the Critical Issues Confronting China lecture series.

Event Presenter:
Jeffrey Lehman, Vice Chancellor and Professor of Law, NYU Shanghai

Virtual event; registration required: https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_LceyUkYtRk6pgFcpV1S-uQ

Hosted by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies. 

Oct
6
Wed
Lecture/Panel

From Classroom to Clinic to the Global Community: Training Non-Traditional Oral Health Providers

12:00PM to 1:00PM
Virtual event; registration required.

With tooth decay impacting almost half of the world’s population, we must shift our mindset from thinking we can train enough dentists to training all health care providers around oral health and its impact on overall health and wellness. Through the Center for Integration of Primary Care and Oral Health (CIPCOH) and other national and global stakeholders, a community of practice is rapidly growing around this mission. During this webinar, our panelists will share promising practices that use a “train the trainer” approach to prepare health care providers to address the global burden of oral disease and to promote oral and overall health.

Event Presenters:

Brittany Seymour, DDS, MPH Associate Professor, Oral Health Policy and Epidemiology Global Health Discipline Director, Harvard School of Dental Medicine.

Hugh Silk, MD, MPH, FAAFP Co-PI, Center for Integration of Primary Care and Oral Health; Professor, Department of Family Medicine and Community Health University of Massachusetts Medical School; Instructor, Harvard School of Dental Medicine and Harvard Medical School. 

Shenam Ticku, BDS, MPH Investigator, Center for Integration of Primary Care and Oral Health and HSDM Initiative to Integrate Oral Health and Medicine; Instructor, Oral Health Policy and Epidemiology, Harvard School of Dental Medicine. 

Tien Jiang, DMD, MEd (Moderator) Investigator, Center for Integration of Primary Care and Oral Health; Instructor, Oral Health Policy and Epidemiology, Harvard School of Dental Medicine.

Virtual event; registration required: https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_yjocOP2qSA2zlgeKuf8gRA

Hosted by the Harvard School of Dental Medicine Office of Global and Community Health. 

Thursday 7th

Oct
7
Thu
Lecture/Panel

You Are My Other Me: Migrant Voices and (In)Visibilities in the Work of Artist Arleene Correa Valencia

3:00PM to 4:30PM
Virtual event; registration required.

Born in Michoacán, Mexico, Arleene Correa Valencia is a visual artist living and working in both Napa and San Francisco, California. A recipient of DACA, she explores her status as a registered “illegal alien” through her art. Working with painting and textiles, Correa Valencia weaves a rich narrative of complex stories about migration, invisibility, fear, separation, representation, resilience, and pride. In this session–the Observatorio’s contribution to Harvard Worldwide Week 2021–she will discuss the interdisciplinary nature of her work from both a political and artistic perspective with Harvard professor Raquel Vega-Durán. The conversation will serve as an opportunity to meet and interact with this inspiring young artist and to learn more about her dynamic art projects.

Event Presenters:

Artist: Arleene Correa Valencia

Professor Raquel Vega-Durán, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

Virtual event, registration required: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfWk_x-VbvA5msVrGRHMaPkYC4k_W2Bcp0-mUwkdeHranXjIQ/viewform

Hosted by Instituto Cerventes at Harvard

Oct
7
Thu
Lecture/Panel

Disaggregating China, Inc: State Strategies in the Liberal Economic Order

4:00PM to 5:30PM
https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_hFMlIkLOQkuXDu6a3r6uMw

Professor Yeling Tan discusses her book, Disaggregating China, Inc: State Strategies in the Liberal Economic Order. China’s entry into the World Trade Organization (WTO) in 2001 represented an historic opportunity to peacefully integrate a rising economic power into the international order based on market-liberal rules. Yet current economic tensions between the U.S. and China indicate that this integration process has run into trouble. To what extent has the liberal internationalist promise of the WTO been fulfilled? To answer this question, this study breaks open the black box of the massive Chinese state and unpacks the economic strategies that central economic agencies as well as subnational authorities adopted in response to WTO rules demanding far-reaching modifications to China’s domestic institutions. The study explains why, rather than imposing constraints, WTO entry provoked divergent policy responses from different actors within the Chinese state, in ways neither expected nor desired by the architects of the WTO.

Event Presenters: Speaker: Yeiling Tan, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Oregon

Virtual event; registration required: https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_hFMlIkLOQkuXDu6a3r6uMw 

Hosted by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies. 

Oct
7
Thu
Lecture/Panel

Creating a Formidable Hero: Ch’oe Ch’iwŏn and Contested Worlds in Chosŏn Literature and Culture

6:00PM to 7:30PM
Virtual event; pre-registration is required.

Virtual talk on premodern Korean literature as a part of Korea Institute's Korea Colloquium series. 

Event Presenter:
Sookja Cho, Associate Professor of Korean and Comparative Literature, Arizona State University

Chaired by Yoon Sun Yang, Associate Professor of Korean & Comparative Literature and Women's, Gender & Sexuality Studies Program, Boston University

Virtual event; registration required

Hosted by the Korea Institute. 

 

Friday 8th

Oct
8
Fri
Lecture/Panel

Why Biodiversity Matters: Discovering and Describing Novel Species in Brazil

3:00PM to 4:30PM
Virtual event; registration required.

The David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies Brazil Office, Museum of Comparative Zoology and Department of Evolutionary and Organismic Biology kick off a three-part series of discussions on "Why Biodiversity Matters". This series aims to showcase the breadth of cutting-edge research related to biodiversity in Brazil being conducted by Harvard researchers and Brazilian colleagues as well as to promote broader discussions around the importance of studying and preserving biodiversity from scientific and societal perspectives. The first discussion on "Why Biodiversity Matters: Discovering and Describing Novel Species in Brazil", introduced by Gonzalo Giribet and moderated by Naomi Pierce and Scott Edwards, will feature an exciting line-up of leading Brazilian scientists, three of whom currently hold postdoctoral fellowships with Harvard, who will overview their ongoing research related to birds, fossils and spiders and discuss the broader implications of their projects and fields.

Event Presenters:

Gonzalo Giribet, Director of the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology and Curator of Invertebrate Zoology in the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University;

João Tonini, Postdoctoral Fellow, Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University;

Cristina Mitaki, Professor of Genetics and Evolutionary Biology, University of São Paulo; Tiago Simões, Postdoctoral Fellow, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University;

Vera Solferini, Professor in the Department of Genetics, Evolution, Microbiology, and Immunology, Unicamp;

Miquéias Ferrão, Postdoctoral Fellow, Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University. 

Moderated by:

Naomi Pierce, Sidney A. and John H. Hessel Professor of Biology, Curator of Lepidoptera in the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University;

Scott Edwards, Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology and Curator of Ornithology in the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University. 

 

Virtual event, registration is required: https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_SPf4k8_YTgymBcLmxFSBcw

Hosted by David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies Brazil Office, Museum of Comparative Zoology, and Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology

 

Oct
8
Fri
Performance

International Comedy Night 2021 with Ronny Chieng

7:00PM to 9:00PM
In person at Harvard Commons, Smith Campus Center. Open to Harvard ID holders +1 guest. Masks are required.

Get a fresh new perspective on the world. Join us for a dose of international-themed humor with The Daily Show comedian Ronny Chieng and the Harvard College Stand-Up Comic Society, in our fifth annual International Comedy Night.


About Ronny Chieng
Ronny Chieng is a stand-up comedian, actor, and Correspondent on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah. He starred in the worldwide hit movie Crazy Rich Asians and on his Netflix stand-up comedy special Asian Comedian Destroys America! He has featured on NBC's Young Rock, Godzilla vs. Kong, Bliss, The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon, The New York Times, and GQ. Ronny is currently starring in Marvel Studios’ Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings and Disney +’s Doogie Kamealoha M.D. Ronny can next be seen in the Blumhouse tech horror thriller M3GAN.

About the Harvard College Stand-Up Comic Society
Founded in 2007, the Harvard College Stand-Up Comic Society (“Harvard College SUCS”) has been entertaining audiences in Sanders Theatre, Queens Head Pub, the Science Center, Fong Auditorium, the Gotham Comedy Club, and one random Rotary Club ever since. During their time with the Society, members have been seen at Improv Boston, the Comedy Studio, the Laugh Factory, and Last Comic Standing, and alumni have gone on to appear on Late Night, America's Got Talent, Last Comic Standing, the Boston Comedy Festival, and many other festivals and showcases. They've also been called a "ragtag band of misfits" by Cosmopolitan Magazine.

Hosted by the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs.

 

The schedule of events for the 2021 Worldwide Week program will be available closer to the event date. 

 

View schedules from past Worldwide Week programs: 

Archive of events from Worldwide Week 2020 
|  Inaugural 24 hours of Harvard program | 

 

Archive of events from Worldwide Week 2019

Archive of events from Worldwide Week 2018

Archive of events from the 2017 inaugural Worldwide Week