Worldwide Week at Harvard 2023

9 - 13 October 2023

Worldwide Week at Harvard showcases the remarkable breadth of Harvard’s global engagement. During Worldwide Week, Harvard Schools, research centers, departments, and student organizations host academic and cultural events with global or international themes.

Submit your event here.

Worldwide Week Events

Tuesday 10th

Oct
10
Tue
Lecture/Panel

20-Year Anniversary Scientific Symposium & Partners Dialogue Promoting Partnerships to Advance the Healthcare Sector in Viet Nam

8:00AM to 4:00PM
Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA 02115

In 2023, Harvard Medical School (HMS) and two of its affiliated hospitals, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, celebrate 20 years of collaboration with our partners, including the Viet Nam Ministry of Health, and Vietnamese universities, hospitals, and clinics. A series of events and celebrations will mark this momentous anniversary. Throughout the 2023 year, we are reflecting and celebrating the accomplishments of this dynamic partnership, examining ways to strengthen further and grow the partnership, and looking forward to new areas of collaboration to support the continued growth and development of a prosperous healthcare sector in Viet Nam, and support the new Comprehensive Strategic Partnership between Viet Nam and the United States.

As a part of these celebration activities, HMS is hosting a symposium entitled “Promoting Partnerships to Advance the Healthcare Sector in Viet Nam” on October 10, 2023.

Event Presenters

Nguyen Thi Lien Huong, Vice Minister of Health of Viet Nam; George Daley, Harvard Medical School Dean; David Golan, HMS Dean of Research Operations and Global Programs; and, many other Harvard faculty, international partners and industry representatives

Host Organization(s)

Viet Nam Ministry of Health; Viet Nam Embassy in the United States; Harvard University Asia Center; Brigham and Women's Hospital; Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Oct
10
Tue

[Exhibition] Chinese, Japanese, and Korean Holdings at Yenching and Houghton Libraries

10:00AM to 5:00PM
Houghton Library Lobby, First Floor, Harvard Yard, Cambridge, MA 02138

Harvard-Yenching Library holds the largest East Asian language collection outside East Asia.
This collaborative exhibition features a diverse selection of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean language materials curated from both Yenching and Houghton’s collections. From depictions of 18th- and 19th-century cross-cultural encounters to video games and playing cards, this display gestures towards the breadth of East Asian holdings across the two repositories.
Items on display include:

• A poem written in Chinese for Harvard president Charles W. Eliot by Ge Kunhua, Harvard's first instructor of Chinese
• A scroll illustrating the arrival of Matthew C. Perry's naval fleet to Japan
• The first Korean translation of The Pilgrim's Progress (1895)
• A 16th-century volume from the Yongle da dian, the largest encyclopedia in existence until the advent of Wikipedia
• A 19th-century illustrated history of a Korean civil servant's different workplaces
• Japanese-language video games

This exhibition was curated by staff members from Yenching and Houghton libraries, faculty from the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, and a member of the 2022–23 cohort of Houghton Visiting Fellows.

Host Organization(s)

Harvard-Yenching Library, Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies

Oct
10
Tue

[Exhibition] Surrogate Nature

10:00AM to 5:00PM
East Asian Art, Gallery 2600, Second Floor, Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy Street, Cambridge

How humans and nonhumans can coexist is a question with a long history. The tenets of Buddhism, for example, reserve special hells for those who abuse animals and plants. Our most recent attempts and failures to respond have brought us face to face with climate change and the devastating results of extractive use of nonhuman beings in a destructive equation that pits humans against “nature.” Can looking for other paradigms help us reconceive our ongoing relationship with the environments that sustain us?

Japanese culture is often characterized as closely affiliated with nature. The pervasive use of seasonal imagery in Japanese literature and painting is built upon centuries of aesthetic tradition that symbolically encodes the emotions and concerns of the human world in emblems such as seasonal flowers and birds. Delicate plum blossoms, the first flowers of the year, for example, are harbingers of hope, while autumnal maple leaves are carriers of the melancholy of autumn.

This kind of re-created or “surrogate” nature evolved and proliferated in urban centers. The results, while beautiful, are not mere decorative representations of flora and fauna. Most of the paintings exhibited here were originally intended to produce an auspicious environment when displayed, others to invoke the moral purity of contemplation of certain symbolically charged plants. However they are read, these works provide an opportunity to reflect on the gap between environment and culture and to ask: What is obscured? What is illuminated? And what new views can we experience in this encounter with paintings from a place and time so different from the here and now?

Host Organization(s)

Harvard Art Museums , Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies

Oct
10
Tue
Lecture/Panel

Why Presidents Leave Early: New or Continued Political Instability in Peru and Ecuador?

12:00PM to 1:30PM
S216, CGIS South

Panelists will reflect on how well their past work, such as Linan’s Presidential Impeachment and the New Political Instability in Latin America (2007) and Helmke’s Institutions on the Edge (2017), explain the recent inter-branch crises in Peru and Ecuador. Do the same theoretical frameworks still apply or did we see new dynamics develop during these recent crises that went against their predictions?

Event Presenters

  • Andres Mejia Acosta, Associate Dean of Policy and Practice and Professor of Political Economy of Development, Keough School of Global Affairs, University of Notre Dame; Gretchen Helmke, University of Rochester; Mariana Llanos, Lead Research Fellow / Co-Leader of the GIGA Institute for Latin American Studies (ad interim).
  • Moderated by: Alisha Holland, Associate Professor of Government, Harvard University

Host Organization(s)

David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies

If attending via Zoom, please register using the following link: https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_j-KEYPTyQruRnnOETDS0WA#/regi... .

Oct
10
Tue
Lecture/Panel

Collaborative Systems for Solving Complex Social Challenges: Preventing Mental Illness in Chile

4:00PM to 6:30PM
In-person: Thompson Room (110), Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street

Event showcasing Worldwide Week: Harvard’s Chile Regional Office, David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, part of the Mahindra series Pedagogies for Life.

The Coalition represents a unified platform, bringing together diverse institutions with a shared goal: crafting sustainable, innovative solutions to bolster mental health in the Maipú and Peñalolén communities. Our particular emphasis lies in aiding women and children.

Addressing this layered and complex challenge demands collaboration from actors accross society, academia, political local authorities, social leaders, the business sector, NGO's and professionals from various fields, including medicine and arts. Sharing a common purpose, driven by trust, knowledge, grassroots experience, and focus on solutions, we implement interventions that embrace preventive strategies by harnessing social technologies. These technologies extend beyond digital means, involving human intellect and creativity, all aimed at positively transforming social processes.

The pandemic's global reach has exposed our societal fragility, yet it has also revealed a profound resilience. Communities banded together, addressing urgent mental health concerns, especially among isolated children and women forced to uphold family structures. The Coalition's high-impact work has deepened our understanding of prevention and spurred innovation in crafting well-structured solutions for multifaceted mental health challenges.

Please register for this event using the following link:  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/collaborative-systems-for-solving-complex-s...?

Event Presenters

  • Claudia Bobadilla, Board Business Member, Founder Puente Social and Senior Fellow, Harvard ALI
  • Fawwaz Habbal, Former Executive Dean for Education and Research, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and Senior Lecturer on Applied Physics
  • Carolina Leitao, Major in Peñalolén, Chile
  • Benjamin Miller, Leader, Speaker, Advocate Empower Program
  • Doris Sommer, Ira and Jewell Williams Professor, Romance Languages & Literatures, African and African American Studies, Harvard University
  • Susana Torres, President of the Board of the Chilean-Swiss Chamber of Commerce
  • Brian Trelstad, Faculty Chair, Advanced Leadership Initiative and Senior Lecturer of Business Administration and Joseph L. Rice, III Faculty Fellow, Harvard Business School
  • Mario Valdivia, Former Dean and Professor, Medical School, Universidad de Concepción
  • Benjamín Villa, Master’s in Design Engineering, Harvard University, and co-instructor with Professor Habbal
  • Tomás Vodanovic, Mayor in Maipú, Chile

Host Organization(s)

DRCLAS Chile Regional Office, The Mahindra Humanities Center, Cultural Agents, Puente Social, Viñedos Chadwick, Municipalidad de Maipú, Municipalidad de Peñalolén, Universidad de Concepción, Cámara Chileno Suiza de Comercio

Oct
10
Tue
Social, Reception, Other

Strings and Ink. Creative Writing through Songs’ Lyrics

4:00PM to 7:00PM
The event will be hybrid (in person and virtual). The link will be accessible on the RCCHU website.

This Creative Writing Workshop proposes the creation of literary texts through the reading, analysis and inspiration of song lyrics. So that people from all backgrounds can participate, and not only students of Spanish or Spanish speakers, we will take as inspiration song lyrics in English, from some of the best singer-songwriters in this language, such as Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen, Joni Mitchell, Kris Kristofferson, Joan Baez, Nick Cave or Nick Drake. We will travel from the first person voice writing to the epistolary and the narrative one, from journals to letters and short stories.

In a first activity, we will start with songs that are portraits of characters, as “Henry Lee” from Nick Cave, to write a diary from the perspective of the same character, capturing the psychology and imagining the background. In a second activity, we will choose as inspiration epistolary songs, as “Famous Blue Raincoat” from Leonard Cohen or Joan Baez’s “Diamonds and rust”, in which one character addresses another, and we will write the answer to that message, embodying the voice that is not heard in the song. Finally, we will start from a song that tells a mysterious and open story, as Dylan’s “I threw it all away”, to write a short story inspired by it, as a prequel or sequel. At the end, we will discuss the literary value of songs, the first drafts of the texts created, and the various interpretations that each one has made of the lyrics of the songs that served as inspiration.

After the workshop and discussion, we will offer an informal reception with beverages and light food in our garden terrace. Those interested in creative writing are welcome, as well as those who love singer-songwriters, or wonder about the didactical uses of songs.

Event Presenters

-Main speaker: Clara Marías, Department of Spanish and Latinamerican Literature, University of Seville, Spain, Research Project +PoeMAS https://poemas.uned.es/, Research Group PASO https://grupo.us.es/paso/)

Host Organization(s)

Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard University (RCCHU)

Oct
10
Tue
Lecture/Panel, Information Session/Networking

Archaeological Exploration of Sardis: Documentation, Design, and Preservation 

5:00PM to 6:00PM
William James Hall, 33 Kirkland St, B1 Lecture Hall

Since its founding in 1958 by Harvard and Cornell Universities, the Archaeological Exploration of Sardis has excavated, conserved, and published on aspects of the ancient city of Sardis in western Türkiye from the prehistoric through the Islamic periods. The expedition is one of the longest-running international projects sponsored at Harvard and is one of the oldest classical archaeology projects in the Mediterranean. In 2013, Türkiye placed the ancient city of  Sardis and the Lydian Tumuli of Bin Tepe  on its Tentative List for inscription onto the UNESCO World Heritage List.

The Archaeological Exploration of Sardis has offered students opportunities to gain academic, professional, cultural, and life skills while contributing to the entire process of archaeological research, documentation, conservation, and publication. The project, which consists of over seventy team members each summer, has in recent years included participants largely from Türkiye and the US, as well as Austria, Bolivia, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Colombia, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Slovakia, Switzerland, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Venezuela, and Vietnam. 

This Worldwide Week at Harvard 2023 event will introduce activities of the Archaeological Exploration of Sardis, and highlight the longstanding involvement of students, particularly of the Graduate School of Design, in documenting and visualizing the ancient site, as well as in designing structures to preserve exposed monuments as part of ongoing site preservation efforts. Recent projects include the construction of a protective covering over an ancient Synagogue (one of the largest known) in 2021, and now over a Lydian mudbrick fortification wall, one of the largest outside Mesopotamia. 

Examples of documentation produced by team members will be on display during the event, such as drawings and 3D models. The event will also be a meet-and-greet for Harvard undergraduate and graduate students to learn more about opportunities to participate in the 2024 excavation season at Sardis.

If you are unable to attend but would like to learn more about participating in the 2024 season, please email  alyssa_martinez@harvard.edu  as soon as possible for more information about the application process. We encourage those interested to submit their application as soon as possible, and no later than the deadline of October 24.

For more information on Sardis, visit:  sardisexpedition.org. 

 

Event Presenters

David N. Fixler, Lecturer in Urban Planning and Design, Department of Urban Planning and Design, Graduate School of Design, Harvard University 

Bahadır Yıldırım, Expedition Administrator and Assistant Director, Archaeological Exploration of Sardis, Harvard Art Museums, Harvard University 

Philip Stinson, Associate Professor of Classics, Department of Classics, Curator and Director, Wilcox Classical Museum, University of Kansas

Zichen Liu, Master’s student in Urban Design, Graduate School of Design, Harvard University 

Hanjia Wang, Master’s student in Design Studies, Graduate School of Design, Harvard University 

Troy Thompson, Managing Partner and CEO of SmithGroup

Jason Ur, Stephen, Phillips Professor of Archaeology and Ethnology, Department of Anthropology, Harvard University

 

Host Organization(s)

Harvard Art Museums, Archaeological Exploration of Sardis

Oct
10
Tue
Social

CultureFest 2023

5:30PM to 7:00PM
Kresge Cafeteria

The Office for Student Affairs invites you to participate in our annual CultureFest event on Tuesday October 10th from 5:30-7:00pm in the Kresge Cafeteria! Celebrate our diverse community with cultural snacks, music, activities and more. All are welcome to attend this fun, social, and community-centered event!

Host Organization(s)

Office for Student Affairs

Wednesday 11th

Oct
11
Wed

[Exhibition] Chinese, Japanese, and Korean Holdings at Yenching and Houghton Libraries

10:00AM to 5:00PM
Houghton Library Lobby, First Floor, Harvard Yard, Cambridge, MA 02138

Harvard-Yenching Library holds the largest East Asian language collection outside East Asia.
This collaborative exhibition features a diverse selection of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean language materials curated from both Yenching and Houghton’s collections. From depictions of 18th- and 19th-century cross-cultural encounters to video games and playing cards, this display gestures towards the breadth of East Asian holdings across the two repositories.
Items on display include:

• A poem written in Chinese for Harvard president Charles W. Eliot by Ge Kunhua, Harvard's first instructor of Chinese
• A scroll illustrating the arrival of Matthew C. Perry's naval fleet to Japan
• The first Korean translation of The Pilgrim's Progress (1895)
• A 16th-century volume from the Yongle da dian, the largest encyclopedia in existence until the advent of Wikipedia
• A 19th-century illustrated history of a Korean civil servant's different workplaces
• Japanese-language video games

This exhibition was curated by staff members from Yenching and Houghton libraries, faculty from the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, and a member of the 2022–23 cohort of Houghton Visiting Fellows.

Host Organization(s)

Harvard-Yenching Library, Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies

Oct
11
Wed

[Exhibition] Surrogate Nature

10:00AM to 5:00PM
East Asian Art, Gallery 2600, Second Floor, Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy Street, Cambridge

How humans and nonhumans can coexist is a question with a long history. The tenets of Buddhism, for example, reserve special hells for those who abuse animals and plants. Our most recent attempts and failures to respond have brought us face to face with climate change and the devastating results of extractive use of nonhuman beings in a destructive equation that pits humans against “nature.” Can looking for other paradigms help us reconceive our ongoing relationship with the environments that sustain us?

Japanese culture is often characterized as closely affiliated with nature. The pervasive use of seasonal imagery in Japanese literature and painting is built upon centuries of aesthetic tradition that symbolically encodes the emotions and concerns of the human world in emblems such as seasonal flowers and birds. Delicate plum blossoms, the first flowers of the year, for example, are harbingers of hope, while autumnal maple leaves are carriers of the melancholy of autumn.

This kind of re-created or “surrogate” nature evolved and proliferated in urban centers. The results, while beautiful, are not mere decorative representations of flora and fauna. Most of the paintings exhibited here were originally intended to produce an auspicious environment when displayed, others to invoke the moral purity of contemplation of certain symbolically charged plants. However they are read, these works provide an opportunity to reflect on the gap between environment and culture and to ask: What is obscured? What is illuminated? And what new views can we experience in this encounter with paintings from a place and time so different from the here and now?

Host Organization(s)

Harvard Art Museums , Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies

Oct
11
Wed
Lecture/Panel

Memorials and the Cult of Apology

12:00PM to 1:00PM
https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_HFNr78RJSfWYf48WHGKflQ#/registration

Valentina Rozas-Krause is an assistant professor in design and architecture at Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez, in Chile. She is an architect and a historian of the built environment who focuses on global cultural practices across the Americas and Europe.

In this lecture, Rozas-Krause will examine the role that memorials play in symbolic and material reparation after political conflicts. Through case studies located in Berlin, Buenos Aires, Detroit, and San Francisco, she builds an empirical and theoretical understanding of multiple aspects of apology and memorialization, of their material forms, the actors involved, and the diverse effects built apologies produce.

Host Organization(s)

Harvard Radcliffe Institute

Oct
11
Wed
Lecture/Panel

US-Japan Cooperation and the Future of the Indo-Pacific: A Conversation with Ambassador Koji Tomita

12:00PM to 1:00PM
Belfer Case Study Room (S020), CGIS South Bldg., 1730 Cambridge St. ; https://harvard.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJwqd-GpqTIjG9HKbvTR8sRyJV2s_zR0XqgR#/registration

Japanese Ambassador to the United States Koji Tomita will give a talk regarding cooperation between the US and Japan on affairs relating to the Indo-Pacific region.

Event Presenters

Christina Davis, Director, Program on U.S.-Japan Relations; Edwin O. Reischauer Professor of Japanese Politics, Department of Government, Harvard University

Host Organization(s)

Sponsored by the Program on US-Japan Relations; Co-sponsored by the Edwin O. Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies; the Harvard Kennedy School Japan Caucus; the Harvard Undergraduate Japan Policy Network; and the Japan Society of Boston.

Oct
11
Wed
Lecture/Panel

Law and Political Economy in China: The Role of Law in Corporate Governance and Market Growth

12:15PM to 1:45PM
WCC 2036 Milstein East A, Harvard Law School

In her new book, Law and Political Economy in China: The Role of Law in Corporate Governance and Market Growth (Cambridge University Press, 2023), Tamar Groswald Ozery takes a law & political economy approach to deconstruct the role of law in China’s market development since 1978.

Please join us for a book launch event featuring a panel of international corporate governance and China law experts. Professor Groswald Ozery, Professor Meg Rithmire, and Dr. Rui Guo will join Professor William Alford in person. Professor Nicholas Howson and Professor Mariana Pargendler will participate via Zoom.

Discussion will mainly focus on the role of formal law in governing markets during the “Legalized Politicization Era” (2010–present), the present era of market development in China.

Event Presenters

Speaker:

  • Tamar Groswald Ozery, Assistant Professor, Department of Asian Studies, Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Panelists:

  • William P. Alford (moderator), Jerome A. and Joan L. Cohen Professor of Law, Director of East Asian Legal Studies, Chair of the Harvard Law School Project on Disability, Harvard Law School
  • Rui Guo, Visiting Scholar, East Asian Legal Studies, Harvard Law School
  • Nicholas C. Howson, Pao Li Tsiang Professor of Law, University of Michigan Law School
  • Mariana Pargendler, Professor, Fundação Getulio Vargas (FGV) Law School; Professor of Law, Harvard Law School (effective July 2024)
  • Meg Rithmire, F. Warren MacFarlan Associate Professor, Business, Government, and International Economy Unit, Harvard Business School

Host Organization(s)

Harvard Law School

Oct
11
Wed
Lecture/Panel

China’s Increased Influence in Europe and Its Impact on Transatlantic Relations

2:00PM to 3:15PM
Hoffmann Room, Adolphus Busch Hall

The New Research on Europe Seminar serves as a weekly forum in which Visiting Scholars at the Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies (CES) present their work-in-progress. This seminar encourages discussions across disciplinary as well as national boundaries. After each presentation, there is ample time for critique and feedback.

Pre-reads are circulated in advance. To request a copy of the paper, participants should contact the speaker directly.

Event Presenters

Valbona Zeneli, Non-Resident Senior Fellow, Europe Center, Atlantic Council; Visiting Scholar 2023-2024, Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies, Harvard University

Host Organization(s)

Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies

Oct
11
Wed
Lecture/Panel

German Exceptionalism in Transformation

4:00PM to 5:15PM
Goldman Room, Adolphus Busch Hall

In response to the war against Ukraine, Germany's Chancellor Olaf Scholz announced a Zeitenwende – a historic turning point – for the country's traditionally cautious defense policy. This policy-shift has many implications for Germany affecting its energy sector, the Bundeswehr and its defense industry. It has also transformed Germany’s historic national identity of military and political restraint, born out of the horrific murders of the Second World War and the Shoa. Anna Sauerbrey will explore the roots for the Zeitenwende – and why it was so quickly accepted by the German public after decades of military skepticism.

Event Presenters

Anna Sauerbrey, Foreign Editor, Die Zeit; John F. Kennedy Memorial Policy Fellow (Fall 2023), Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies, Harvard University

Host Organization(s)

Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies

Oct
11
Wed
Lecture/Panel

Academic Freedom: Empirical Data on a Contested Idea

4:15PM to 5:30PM
In person: Malkin Penthouse, 4th Floor, Littauer Building, Harvard Kennedy School; Registration link: https://hksexeced.tfaforms.net/f/event-registration?c=7014V000000jD4jQAE

You’re invited to a Global Challenges to Democracy  Seminar Series event featuring Katrin Kinzelbach, Professor of International Politics of Human Rights, Friedrich-Alexander-Universitä. Professor Kinzelbach will discuss academic freedom from a human rights-based perspective, drawing on international hard and soft law, and then present the 2023 edition of the Academic Freedom Index (AFI), highlighting comparisons between countries and developments over time.

Event Presenters

Katrin Kinzelbach, Professor of International Politics of Human Rights, Friedrich-Alexander-Universitä; Tarek Masoud, Ford Foundation Professor of Democracy and Governance, will serve as a discussant. Kathryn Sikkink, Ryan Family Professor of Human Rights Policy, will serve as moderator.

Host Organization(s)

Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation + Carr Center for Human Rights at Harvard Kennedy School

Oct
11
Wed
Lecture/Panel

Job Search for International Students with Dan Beaudry

4:30PM to 5:30PM
MCS (54 Dunster Street, Cambridge, MA 02138)

Interested in hearing how H-1B sponsorship happens from the inside? Dan Beaudry, former head of campus recruiting at Monster.com, shares the potent job search system used by many international students to find U.S. employment. H-1B’s are won in ways you likely don’t expect.

 

Host Organization(s): Mignone Center for Career Success

Oct
11
Wed
Lecture/Panel, Social, Reception

Puzzle-solving in AI Ethics: Putting Ethics into Practice in Innovation

5:00PM to 8:00PM
The event will be hybrid (in person and virtual). The link will be accessible on the RCCHU website.

Lecture / Panel

While Artificial Inteligence (AI) ethics and responsible AI increasingly receive more attention, there remains a confusion about their scope and how to execute them. Multiple disciplines work on ethical questions related to AI but the disconnect between them impair the efficiency and robustness of the practice. Every organization comes up with a set of AI ethics principles but often they fail to operationalize them because of conceptual errors and vagueness, and a lack of understanding of their function. In this talk, an AI ethics practice model developed and employed at AI Ethics Lab: The Puzzle-solving in Ethics (PiE) Model is presented. The PiE Model is a comprehensive and structured practice framework for organizations to integrate ethics into their operations as they develop and deploy AI systems. The PiE Model aims to make ethics a robust and integral part of innovation and enhance innovation through ethical puzzle-solving. Social gathering After the panel and discussion, we will offer an informal reception with beverages and light food in our garden terrace.

Social Gathering
After the panel and discussion, we will offer an informal reception with beverages and light food in our garden terrace.

Event Presenters:

-Main speaker: CANSU CANCA, Northeastern University, AI Ethics Lab, United Nations Expert Consultant
-Presenters: Daniel Sanchez Mata, Director, Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard University (RCCHU), and Luis Salgado, Delegate of Technical University of Madrid (UPM) at RCCHU

Host Organization(s):

Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard University (RCCHU)

Oct
11
Wed
Lecture/Panel, Reception

'Books are Useless': Collecting, Excess, and Bibliophile Culture in Prewar Japan

5:30PM to 7:00PM
In-person: Houghton Library, Harvard Yard, Cambridge, MA 02138

This talk is followed by a Q&A with Prof. Shockey and a reception. Attendees are also encouraged to visit the newly-opened East Asian materials exhibition in the lobby of the Houghton Library.
 

Event Presenters

Nathan Shockey, Associate Professor of Japanese, Bard College

Host Organization(s)

Houghton Library Winship Lecture co-sponsored by the Harvard-Yenchin Institute and Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies.

Oct
11
Wed
Lecture/Panel

Translating the Language of Death

6:00PM to 7:30PM
Pritsak Memorial Library at HURI, 34 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

This bilingual reading will feature Iya Kiva, a Ukrainian poet, translator, and journalist who left her native Donetsk when war broke out in 2014 against Russia-backed separatists. At that time, Kiva also shifted from writing in Russian to writing in Ukrainian. Kiva’s critically acclaimed poetry has been translated into numerous languages. Kiva has long written about the act of translation as a process for understanding her own, and her country’s, diverse linguistic and ethnic history. Her poetic personae wander Ukraine, where they visit unfamiliar cemeteries “translating the language of death,” and mix up streets "like words in related languages”. A bilingual collection of Iya’s poetry, translated by Amelia Glaser and Yuliya Ilchuk, is currently in press with Harvard University’s Ukrainian Research Institute, distributed by Harvard University Press.

Event Presenters

Poetry Reading by Iya Kiva, poet, translator, and journalist living in Kyiv, Ukraine; Moderated by Oleh Kotsyuba, Manager of Publications at the Ukrainian Research Institute, Harvard University

Host Organization(s)

Ukrainian Research Institute, Harvard and the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Harvard

Thursday 12th

Oct
12
Thu
Lecture/Panel

The Geopolitics of Critical Materials: The Role of Central Asia

9:00AM to 10:00AM
Zoom Webinar; https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_dilRxDZFQwiBGdzsCIyC8w#/registration

The energy transition is causing a surge in demand for minerals for clean energy technologies, raising concerns about the sources and security of supplies of critical materials. Central Asia has vast deposits of critical materials. The seminar will shed light on the Central Asian mineral resource base and assess its current and potential contributions to global supply chains. It will explore whether Central Asia can become a new hotspot for mineral extraction and a major global supplier of selected critical materials for clean energy technologies. It will also discuss the rising tensions and competition over critical materials between China, the EU, and the US and possible implications for Central Asia.

Event Presenters

Sophia Kalantzakos, Global Distinguished Professor in Environmental Studies and Public Policy, New York University Abu Dhabi, the UAE; Roman Vakulchuk, Head of Climate and Energy Research Group, Norwegian Institute of International Affairs (NUPI); Nargis Kassenova, Senior Fellow; Director, Program on Central Asia, Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies

Host Organization(s)

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard University and Norwegian Institute of International Affairs (NUPI)

Oct
12
Thu
Lecture/Panel

Harvard Humanitarian Initiative Global Showcase

10:00AM to 11:15AM
https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_n-eLwo3ySeuvtRtW1nu1Iw

Please join the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative (HHI) on October 12 at 10 am ET for a virtual showcase of our work. HHI is a university-wide academic and research center in humanitarian crisis and leadership. We aim to create new knowledge and advance evidence-based leadership in disasters and humanitarian crises through two main areas: the Humanitarian Academy at Harvard and Research & Translation. Our Humanitarian Academy produces a variety of online and in-person trainings designed to prepare students, practitioners, and emerging leaders to succeed in the humanitarian field. Our global research programs explore topics critical to communities affected by crises, such as infectious diseases and epidemics, disaster preparedness, gender-based violence, and the ethical use of data in humanitarian settings. 

During this webinar, participants will learn more about our global research and educational programs and how to get involved in our work. This event is free and open to the public.

Register here: https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_n-eLwo3ySeuvtRtW1nu1Iw

To request accommodations, please contact hhi@harvard.edu in advance of the program. 

Host Organization(s)

Harvard Humanitarian Initiative

Oct
12
Thu

[Exhibition] Chinese, Japanese, and Korean Holdings at Yenching and Houghton Libraries

10:00AM to 5:00PM
Houghton Library Lobby, First Floor, Harvard Yard, Cambridge, MA 02138

Harvard-Yenching Library holds the largest East Asian language collection outside East Asia.
This collaborative exhibition features a diverse selection of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean language materials curated from both Yenching and Houghton’s collections. From depictions of 18th- and 19th-century cross-cultural encounters to video games and playing cards, this display gestures towards the breadth of East Asian holdings across the two repositories.
Items on display include:

• A poem written in Chinese for Harvard president Charles W. Eliot by Ge Kunhua, Harvard's first instructor of Chinese
• A scroll illustrating the arrival of Matthew C. Perry's naval fleet to Japan
• The first Korean translation of The Pilgrim's Progress (1895)
• A 16th-century volume from the Yongle da dian, the largest encyclopedia in existence until the advent of Wikipedia
• A 19th-century illustrated history of a Korean civil servant's different workplaces
• Japanese-language video games

This exhibition was curated by staff members from Yenching and Houghton libraries, faculty from the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, and a member of the 2022–23 cohort of Houghton Visiting Fellows.

Host Organization(s)

Harvard-Yenching Library, Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies

Oct
12
Thu

[Exhibition] Surrogate Nature

10:00AM to 5:00PM
East Asian Art, Gallery 2600, Second Floor, Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy Street, Cambridge

How humans and nonhumans can coexist is a question with a long history. The tenets of Buddhism, for example, reserve special hells for those who abuse animals and plants. Our most recent attempts and failures to respond have brought us face to face with climate change and the devastating results of extractive use of nonhuman beings in a destructive equation that pits humans against “nature.” Can looking for other paradigms help us reconceive our ongoing relationship with the environments that sustain us?

Japanese culture is often characterized as closely affiliated with nature. The pervasive use of seasonal imagery in Japanese literature and painting is built upon centuries of aesthetic tradition that symbolically encodes the emotions and concerns of the human world in emblems such as seasonal flowers and birds. Delicate plum blossoms, the first flowers of the year, for example, are harbingers of hope, while autumnal maple leaves are carriers of the melancholy of autumn.

This kind of re-created or “surrogate” nature evolved and proliferated in urban centers. The results, while beautiful, are not mere decorative representations of flora and fauna. Most of the paintings exhibited here were originally intended to produce an auspicious environment when displayed, others to invoke the moral purity of contemplation of certain symbolically charged plants. However they are read, these works provide an opportunity to reflect on the gap between environment and culture and to ask: What is obscured? What is illuminated? And what new views can we experience in this encounter with paintings from a place and time so different from the here and now?

Host Organization(s)

Harvard Art Museums , Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies

Oct
12
Thu
Lecture/Panel

From Local Innovations to Global Impact: Oral Cancer Screenings and Multimedia

12:00PM to 1:00PM
https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_NU63rRX8Q0OFo3VpeoFzhg

Innovation grows from an individual’s quest to fix a problem. One such problem is that oral cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. In the U.S., 72.2% of patients are diagnosed at late stages, which leads to poor survival rates. The solution is earlier detection. But turning theory into practice takes creativity and perseverance. During this webinar, two clinician-educators will share their stories about their multimedia innovations in oral cancer screening, their passion for training future oral health providers, and the impact both will have on improving patient outcomes.

Event Presenters

Tien Jiang, DMD, MEd, Instructor & Prosthodontist
Harvard School of Dental Medicine

Razan Baabdullah, BDS, MS, FRCDC
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon
Assistant Professor, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Faculty of Dentistry, King AbdulAziz University

Reshma Menon, BDS, DMSc
Assistant Professor, Diagnostic Sciences - Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Tufts University, School of Dental Medicine

Host Organization(s)

Harvard School of Dental Medicine - Office of Global and Community Health

Oct
12
Thu
Lecture/Panel

China, Cuba and Latin America in the current context

1:00PM to 2:30PM
https://drclas.harvard.edu/event/china-cuba-y-latinoamérica-en-el-contexto-actual?delta=0

This virtual seminar will explore the impact of China’s geopolitical strategies in Latin America and delve into Cuba's position in this evolving landscape. This event is online; to register, please use the following link: https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Fa2cLqDNRtyK4d5lQxqdSA#/regi....

Event Presenters

  • Carlos Malamud, Professor of Latin American History at the National University of Education at Distance (UNED), Madrid.
  • Jeffrey DeLaurentis, Diplomat, Former Ambassador, Adjunct Professor, Consultant.
  • Carlos Alzugaray, Independent political analyst, Ex-diplomat, Professor and Writer.
  • Alejandro de la Fuente, Robert Woods Bliss Professor of Latin American History and Economics; Chair, Cuba Studies Program, Harvard University.
  • Tania Bruguera, Senior Lecturer In Media & Performance, Theater, Dance & Media, Harvard University.

Host Organization(s)

Presented in collaboration with the Institute for Latin American Studies of the Sorbonne Nouvelle University

Oct
12
Thu
Lecture/Panel

In our own voices: Community-led research on police violence in Brazil

2:00PM to 3:30PM
In-person: CGIS S216, 1730 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA 02138

Join us for a presentation of the participatory action research project, “Voices of Pain, Struggle, and Resistance of Mothers of Victims of State Violence in Brazil.” The project is a collaborative initiative led researchers at Harvard Kennedy School, the Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP), and Mothers of May, a collective of mothers of victims of police killings in Brazil. IMPORTANT NOTE: the conversation will be in Portuguese. Please bring your own earphones to access the online simultaneous translation app.

Presenters:
Yanilda González, Assistant Professor of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School
Raiane Assumpção, Professor and President of the Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP)
Débora Maria da Silva, Coordinator and Co-founder, Mothers of May Movement
Edna Carla Souza Cavalcante, Coordinator, Mothers of the Periphery
Nívia do Carmo Raposo, Movement of Mothers and Families of Victims of State Violence
Rute Fiuza, Mothers of May of the Northeast
Aline Rocco, Researcher, Center for Forensic Anthropology and Archeology
Valéria Oliveira, Researcher, Center for Forensic Anthropology and Archeology

Host Organization:

David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies (DRCLAS)

Oct
12
Thu
Lecture/Panel

Center for International Development: Research Engagements in Morocco with Professor Rema Hanna

2:30PM to 3:45PM
Perkins Conference Room, Rubenstein 4th Floor, Harvard Kennedy School

How does the Center for International Development (CID) help to create a culture of evidence-based policymaking through research engagements? Join CID Faculty Affiliate Rema Hanna and CID students to learn about ongoing research and programming in Morocco, where CID started an engagement in 2020 in collaboration with the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL) and is looking to expand the research scope in the coming years.

Please register for the event using the following link: https://hksexeced.tfaforms.net/f/cid-check-in?c=7014V000000jCwBQAU&ts=16...

Event Presenters

Rema Hanna, Jeffrey Cheah Professor of South-East Asia Studies and Chair of the International Development Area at the Harvard Kennedy School. She is the Evidence for Policy Design (EPoD) Faculty Director and a CID Faculty Affiliate.

Host Organization

Center for International Development (CID)

Oct
12
Thu
Lecture/Panel, Performance, Information Session/Networking, Reception

Asia-Africa Relations: Its Status and Possible Trajectories (Day 1)

3:00PM to 6:15PM
S020, Belfer Case Study Room, CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge St., Cambridge, MA

PANEL: Diaspora and Identity in Asia-Africa Relations: A Conversation with Authors

The discussion featuring two authors, Ufrieda Ho, and Gayatri Sethi, will be moderated by Duncan Yoon from New York University. The conversation will delve into the themes explored in their respective books: Paper Sons and Daughters: Growing up Chinese in South Africa (Ohio University Press, 2012) by Ufrieda Ho and Unbelonging (Mango & Marigold Press, 2021) by Gayatri Sethi. The conversation hopes to explore the diaspora experiences and identity formation as seen through the lens of these two authors and their works. It provides an opportunity to engage with the rich tapestry of narratives that shape the relationships between Asia and Africa while exploring the personal stories that breathe life into these broader themes.

3:00 p.m.
Opening Address
Emmanuel K. Akyeampong, Harvard University

3:20-5:15 p.m.
Diaspora and Identity in Asia-Africa Relations: A Conversation with Authors
Ufrieda Ho, Journalist and Author
Gayatri Sethi, Educator and Author
Moderator: Duncan Yoon, New York University

Reception
Performance by The Kuumba Singers of Harvard College
Concourse, CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge St. Cambridge

This is the first day of the two-day conference. Check full conference details here: https://asiacenter.harvard.edu/asia-africa-relations-its-status-and-poss...

The conversation hopes to explore the diaspora experiences and identity formation as seen through the lens of these two authors and their works. It provides an opportunity to engage with the rich tapestry of narratives that shape the relationships between Asia and Africa while exploring the personal stories that breathe life into these broader themes.

The conference will also be live-streamed via Asia Center's YouTube channel.

Event Presenters

Emmanuel K. Akyeampong, Harvard University

Host Organization(s)

Organized by the Harvard University Asia Center and Harvard University Center for African Studies in collaboration with Maria Adele Carrai and Duncan Yoon. Co-sponsored by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard-Yenching Institute, Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Program on U.S.-Japan Relations, and Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies.

Oct
12
Thu
Lecture/Panel

Data Science and AI Career Pathways

4:00PM to 5:00PM
https://harvard.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJ0lcuurqT0qHtydoXTOfCoAaBpM7aimOi3h

AI is changing our lives and impacting all sectors including education, art and healthcare. Data Science and AI are hot fields with growing opportunities for those with advanced quantitative, analytical, and computational skills to make a huge global impact. Organizations are looking for scientists and engineers who can demystify big data and AI trends into understandable business terms. Learn more about how you can enter this exciting field, and talk with data scientists/ ML Engineers from a variety of companies focused on making sense of AI and data.

If you have accessibility needs or questions related to this event, please contact mcs@fas.harvard.edu.

Event Presenters

Caroline Rende, Interim Associate Director, Harvard Griffin GSAS Graduate Career Services; Meaghan Shea, Assistant Director, Harvard College Career Services (Technology, Data Analytics, Life & Physical Sciences and Entrepreneurship)

Host Organization(s)

Harvard University Faculty of Arts and Sciences- Mignone Center for Career Success

Oct
12
Thu
Lecture/Panel

America's Longest War: Korea

4:30PM to 6:00PM
Hybrid: Harvard Faculty Club, 20 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA 02138 (please see link to register for Zoom attendance)

Wagner Special Lecture

Bruce Cumings
Gustavus F. and Ann M. Swift Distinguished Service Professor of History and the College, University of Chicago

Chaired by Carter Eckert, Yoon Se Young Professor of Korean History, Harvard University and Nicholas Harkness, Modern Korean Economy and Society Professor of Anthropology; Director, Korea Institute, Harvard University

Abstract:
Korean War has never ended, and that it was first envisioned in 1945 when the US sent 25,000 combat troops to occupy southern Korea. It still has 28,000 troops there today but now faces a nuclear armed North. Professor Cumings will focus on the conclusion of conventional combat in 1953, which occurred under the shadow of American nuclear blackmail, presaging the placing of American nuclear weapons in South Korea in 1958, and inaugurating a long term policy down to the present of threatening North Korea with nuclear weapons, which it never possessed until 2006.

Host Organization(s):

Korea Institute

Oct
12
Thu
Lecture/Panel

The First European Women in the Americas

4:30PM to 6:00PM
In person and virtually: https://cervantesobservatorio.fas.harvard.edu/enhttps://cervantesobservatorio.fas.harvard.edu/en/contact

The historical and literary imaginary of the colonization of the Americas has been crystalized in epic deeds and hardworking, valiant men. The near-total absence of women in a centuries-long process would lead us to think the men were there alone, even if it is manifestly obvious that this could not have been the case. When the voices of minoritized groups arrive on the literary and historiographical scenes (only in the 20th century), we understand that women had been silenced, though, of course, they had had much to do and to say. Thanks to collaborative history and to historiographic metafiction, among other critical perspectives that help, little by little, to register notable absences, we can now approach colonization in its multiple perceptions. As a professor of literature, the speaker will address the topic by resorting to literary texts, memoirs, and biographies. This event will be held in Spanish.

 

Hosted by Observatory of the Spanish Language and Hispanic Cultures in the United States (Instituto Cervantes at Harvard University)

Oct
12
Thu
Lecture/Panel

[Postponed] The Israeli Protest Movement: Is 'Jewish and Democratic' Really Possible?”: A conversation with Dr. Shaul Magid & Derek Penslar

4:30PM to 6:00PM
In-person: CGIS Knafel 262, 1737 Cambridge St, Cambridge, MA 02138

This event has been postponed until further notice.

Professors Shaul Magid and Derek Penslar will lead a discussion of the recent Israeli protest movement.

Event Presenters

Shaul Magid, Professor of Jewish Studies at Dartmouth College and Visiting Professor of Modern Jewish Studies at Harvard University, and

Derek Penslar, William Lee Frost Professor of Jewish History and Director of the Center for Jewish Studies, Harvard University

Host Organization(s)

Center for Middle Eastern Studies Middle East Seminar

Oct
12
Thu

Harvard Global Health Institute: Summer Research & Internship Showcase

5:00PM to 6:00PM

Join us for a Global Health Internship Showcase, where students from the Harvard Global Health Institute Summer Programs will present about their transformative summer research and internship experiences in Mexico, Peru, South Africa, Rwanda, England, and more!

This event will be on Zoom. Please register using the following link: https://harvard.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEtfumtrjkjGt2VBuzs1p-H08MhgZE...

Host Organization(s)

Harvard Global Health Institute

Oct
12
Thu
Lecture/Panel

Empowerment through education in prisons: examples in Greece and the US

5:15PM to 7:15PM
Hybrid: William James Hall, Room 105, 33 Kirkland St, Cambridge, MA; Zoom link provided in description.

This open roundtable discussion brings together different experiences and ideas on teaching humanities to residents within prisons, domestically and abroad. We will also hear the perspective of a re-entering citizen after decades behind bars. What can be done to improve education programs in prisons? Why are the humanities crucial now more than ever? How have these initiatives helped to empower the residents within these facilities? Join us to learn more and get involved in the development of the CHS prison education initiative.

For those who would like to attend remotely, please use the following Zoom registration link: https://harvard.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJYsd-urrD4jGtznMfnRhrbh_YYpU2DULq7q#/registration

Addtionally, you can see the event page on the CHS US website here, and on the CHS Greece website here.

Event Presenters

Emily Allen-Hornblower, Associate Professor of Classics, Rutgers University
Jessie Bates, Harvard student (Senior), Social Studies Concentrator
Matina Goga, Curricular Development Manager, Center for Hellenic Studies in Greece
Alkistis Kontogianni, Emeritus Professor, Department of Theatre Studies, University of the Peloponnese
Marquis McCray, Mass Incarceration Survivor and Advocate for the Humanities (Behind Bars and Beyond)
Adaner Usmani, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Social Studies, Harvard University

Moderator
Caroline Stark, Associate Professor of Classics, Howard University, and Associate Director of Academic Affairs, Center for Hellenic Studies, Washington, DC

Oct
12
Thu
Lecture/Panel

Rivermouth: A Chronicle of Language, Faith and Migration—A Conversation with Alejandra Oliva

5:15PM to 6:30PM
James Room, Swartz Hall, Harvard Divinity School, 45 Francis Ave.

Alejandra Oliva, MTS '19, Mexican-American writer, translator, and immigration-justice activist, will speak with us about her work and her recent book, described as "a supremely intelligent account of a translator's journey into the Kafkaesque machinery of U.S. immigration and asylum policy." (Héctor Tobar, author of Translation Nation).

Host Organization(s)

Harvard Divinity School

Oct
12
Thu
Performance, Reception

Mūsīqā: An Evening of Music from the Islamicate World

6:30PM to 9:00PM
In-person: Williams Chapel, Schwarz Hall, Harvard Divinity School, 45 Francis Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138; Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/musiqa-an-evening-of-music-from-the-islamicate-world-tickets-722874476017?aff=oddtdtcreator

An evening of music from the Islamicate world, featuring presentations and performances in Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Urdu and other musical traditions.

Event Presenters

Masoud Ariankhoo, PhD Student in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations
Bahar Badieitabar, Student, Berklee College of Music
Nicholas Boylston, Assistant Professor of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations
Ali Demir, Research Fellow in Neurology, Harvard Medical School
Mahya Hamedi, Student, Berklee College of Music
Richard Wolf, Professor of Music and South Asian Studies
Tulaib Zafir, PhD Student in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations
Noor Ensemble

Host Organization(s)

Hosted by the Alwaleed Islamic studies Program at Harvard University
Co-sponsors: Department of Music, Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, and Center for the Study of World Religions at Harvard Divinity School

Oct
12
Thu
Performance

International Comedy Night with Alingon Mitra and the Harvard University Stand-Up Comic Society

7:00PM to 9:00PM
In-person: Smith Campus Center, 1350 Massachusetts Avenue, Harvard Commons, 1st Floor.

Get a fresh new perspective on the world. Join us for a dose of international-themed humor with comedian Alingon Mitra and the Harvard College Stand-Up Comic Society, in our seventh annual International Comedy Night.

About Alingon Mitra: Alingon is a stand-up comedian and comedy writer living in New York. He has written for the Daily Show with Trevor Noah on Comedy Central and was also staffed on Adam Ruins Everything for TruTV. He has done stand-up on the Late Show with Stephen Colbert, Conan, Late Night with Craig Ferguson, and Adam Devine's House Party. After becoming a semi-finalist on Last Comic Standing, Alingon won the coveted “Comic Comeback” award to appear in the season finale. He was selected to be a new face at Just For Laughs Comedy Festival in Montreal in 2015. Alingon graduated from Harvard, where he was a writer for the illustrious Harvard Lampoon.

About the Harvard College Stand-Up Comic Society: Founded in 2007, the Harvard College Stand-Up Comic Society (“Harvard College SUCS”) has been entertaining audiences in Sanders Theatre, Queens Head Pub, the Science Center, Fong Auditorium, the Gotham Comedy Club, and one random Rotary Club ever since. During their time with the Society, members have been seen at Improv Boston, the Comedy Studio, the Laugh Factory, and Last Comic Standing, and alumni have gone on to appear on Late Night, America's Got Talent, Last Comic Standing, the Boston Comedy Festival, and many other festivals and showcases. They've also been called a "ragtag band of misfits" by Cosmopolitan Magazine.

 

This event is free and open to the Harvard community and guests. No tickets required; seating is on first available basis. 

 

Event Presenters

Alingon Mitra with the Harvard College Stand-Up Comic Society

Host Organization(s)

Weatherhead Center for International Affairs

Friday 13th

Oct
13
Fri
Lecture/Panel, Information Session/Networking

Asia-Africa Relations: Its Status and Possible Trajectories (Day 2)

8:15AM to 5:00PM
S010, Tsai Auditorium, CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge St., Cambridge, MA

Panel 1: Globalization Beyond the West
Globalization is often portrayed through a Western lens, shaping our understanding and expectations of international relations and economic development. But what about narratives beyond the West? In this panel, "Globalization Beyond the West," we explore globalization's distinctive yet intertwined trajectories within the context of Asia-Africa relations. We invite scholars to examine the cross-continental influences, shared experiences, and unique challenges these regions face. The panel aims to unravel the multifaceted dynamics of globalization that extend beyond the Western world and envision a more nuanced and inclusive global discourse.


Panel 2: Africa-Asian Historical Connections
The panel explores the historical ties that bind the African and Asian continents. It aims to shed light on the shared experiences and intricate interconnections that span millennia, ranging from ancient trade routes and civilizational exchanges to shared struggles for independence and decolonization. As we excavate these historical ties, we aim to foster an understanding of how these rich interactions have shaped present-day Africa-Asia relations and their joint role in today's global landscape.


Panel 3: Reconceptualizing Agency
Agency, often considered from a Western paternalistic perspective, warrants reconsideration in light of Asia-Africa relations. The panel invites participants to examine this concept through the unique socio-cultural, economic, and political contexts of Asian and African societies. This panel aims to uncover how agency, as experienced and expressed in these diverse societies, shapes. It also hopes to go beyond the agency, exploring ways in which we can reconceptualize Africa and Asia's contribution to international society.


Panel 4: The Vernacular of Everyday Infrastructures
In this panel, we hope to reveal the profound influence of everyday infrastructures - from public transportation and local markets to digital networks and informal housing - on the societies and relationships within and between Asian and African nations. Our panel of experts will show how these infrastructures, often constructed and consumed in local languages and practices, create a vibrant vernacular that underpins social dynamics, economic activities, and cultural exchanges.

8:15-9:00 a.m.

 Breakfast 

9:15-10:45 a.m. 
Panel 1: Globalization Beyond the West
Moderator: Geoffrey Jones, Harvard Business School
Panelists:

  • Annette Skovsted Hansen, Aarhus University
  • Isaac Odoom, Carleton University
  • Marlous van Waijenburg, Harvard Business School


10:45-11:00 a.m.

 Coffee Break 

11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Panel 2: Africa-Asia Historical Connections
Moderator: Emmanuel K. Akyeampong, Harvard University
Panelists:

  • Seifudein Adem, Doshisha University
  • Lina Benabdallah, Wake Forest University
  • Maria Adele Carrai, New York University Shanghai
  • Idriss Fofana, Harvard University


12:30-1:30 p.m. 

Lunch

1:30-3:00 p.m.
Panel 3: Reconceptualizing Agency
Moderator: Maria Adele Carrai, New York University Shanghai
Panelists:

  • Kumiko Makino, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization
  • Xiaoyang Tang, Tsinghua University
  • Veda Vaidyanathan, Institute of Chinese Studies, Delhi


3:00-3:15 p.m.

Coffee Break 

3:15-4:45 p.m. 
Panel 4: The Vernacular of Everyday Infrastructures
Moderator: Annette Lienau, Harvard University
Panelists:

  • Daniel E. Agbiboa, Harvard University
  • Gaurav Desai, University of Michigan
  • Pedro Machado, Indiana University Bloomington


4:45-5:00 p.m.
Concluding Remarks  

 

The conference will also be live-streamed via Asia Center's YouTube channel.
 

Host Organization(s)

Organized by the Harvard University Asia Center and Harvard University Center for African Studies in collaboration with Maria Adele Carrai and Duncan Yoon. Co-sponsored by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard-Yenching Institute, Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, Program on U.S.-Japan Relations, and Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies.

Oct
13
Fri
Lecture/Panel

Water Stories: Panel Discussions

10:00AM to 11:30AM
Hybrid: Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 and online via Zoom

The exhibition, “Water Stories: River Goddesses, Ancestral Rites, and Climate Crisis,” on view at Harvard Radcliffe Institute, illuminates the cultural, religious, and political significance of water—beyond an extractive commodity framework—and draws attention to the legacy of colonial rule and imperialism in the climate crisis. This program will bring together artists with scholars of religion, anthropology, and transnational studies to explore water’s multivalent meaning and to contemplate our current relationships with water. Participants will discuss traditional paintings depicting mythological stories along with contemporary works evoking different aesthetic and spiritual experiences of water in the age of climate crisis.

Host Organization(s)

Harvard Radcliffe Institute

Oct
13
Fri

[Exhibition] Chinese, Japanese, and Korean Holdings at Yenching and Houghton Libraries

10:00AM to 5:00PM
Houghton Library Lobby, First Floor, Harvard Yard, Cambridge, MA 02138

Harvard-Yenching Library holds the largest East Asian language collection outside East Asia.
This collaborative exhibition features a diverse selection of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean language materials curated from both Yenching and Houghton’s collections. From depictions of 18th- and 19th-century cross-cultural encounters to video games and playing cards, this display gestures towards the breadth of East Asian holdings across the two repositories.
Items on display include:

• A poem written in Chinese for Harvard president Charles W. Eliot by Ge Kunhua, Harvard's first instructor of Chinese
• A scroll illustrating the arrival of Matthew C. Perry's naval fleet to Japan
• The first Korean translation of The Pilgrim's Progress (1895)
• A 16th-century volume from the Yongle da dian, the largest encyclopedia in existence until the advent of Wikipedia
• A 19th-century illustrated history of a Korean civil servant's different workplaces
• Japanese-language video games

This exhibition was curated by staff members from Yenching and Houghton libraries, faculty from the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, and a member of the 2022–23 cohort of Houghton Visiting Fellows.

Host Organization(s)

Harvard-Yenching Library, Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies

Oct
13
Fri

[Exhibition] Surrogate Nature

10:00AM to 5:00PM
East Asian Art, Gallery 2600, Second Floor, Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy Street, Cambridge

How humans and nonhumans can coexist is a question with a long history. The tenets of Buddhism, for example, reserve special hells for those who abuse animals and plants. Our most recent attempts and failures to respond have brought us face to face with climate change and the devastating results of extractive use of nonhuman beings in a destructive equation that pits humans against “nature.” Can looking for other paradigms help us reconceive our ongoing relationship with the environments that sustain us?

Japanese culture is often characterized as closely affiliated with nature. The pervasive use of seasonal imagery in Japanese literature and painting is built upon centuries of aesthetic tradition that symbolically encodes the emotions and concerns of the human world in emblems such as seasonal flowers and birds. Delicate plum blossoms, the first flowers of the year, for example, are harbingers of hope, while autumnal maple leaves are carriers of the melancholy of autumn.

This kind of re-created or “surrogate” nature evolved and proliferated in urban centers. The results, while beautiful, are not mere decorative representations of flora and fauna. Most of the paintings exhibited here were originally intended to produce an auspicious environment when displayed, others to invoke the moral purity of contemplation of certain symbolically charged plants. However they are read, these works provide an opportunity to reflect on the gap between environment and culture and to ask: What is obscured? What is illuminated? And what new views can we experience in this encounter with paintings from a place and time so different from the here and now?

Host Organization(s)

Harvard Art Museums , Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies

Oct
13
Fri
Lecture/Panel

New Approaches to Experiential Teaching on Health and Human Rights: Summer in Palestine, Greece, and opportunities for global ex

12:00PM to 12:45PM
Zoom (see link in description)

Join for a discussion on the core pedagogical initiatives of the FXB Center for Health and Human Rights and ways you can get involved. Learn more about the following:

Intensive Summer Course on Migration and Refugee Studies in Greece
This three-week intensive, interdisciplinary course on migration and refugee studies is designed to offer participants both conceptual and practical engagement with key issues related to contemporary forced migration. The course schedule includes lectures, seminars, interactive class sessions and fieldwork. It is held in four sites in Greece – Athens, Ancient Olympia, Nafplio and Lesvos. Expert lecturers include leading scholars, politicians, leaders of international organizations, civil society organizations and migrant/refugee groups. The course is taught in English and organized around a multidisciplinary, rights-based curriculum that draws on legal, medical, environmental and broader social science approaches to migration policy and practice. Enrollment is limited to 30 students (15 Harvard graduate students and 15 students from other Universities across the world).

Palestine Social Medicine Course
This three-week intensive summer course is designed to introduce students to the social, structural, political, and historical aspects that determine Palestinian health ‘beyond the biological basis of disease.’ Course pedagogy includes field visits, group discussion, presentations, and personal reflection to foster a transformative learning environment. Guest speakers include a wide range of health and social actors including health practitioners, community organizers, activists, academics, and representatives from civil society organizations. The course is based at the Institute of Community and Public Health at Birzeit University, West Bank, occupied Palestinian territory. A variety of experiential field visits take students to locations throughout the West Bank and Israel.

G. Barrie Landry Child Protection Professional Training Program
The G. Barrie Landry Child Protection Professional Training program (Landry CP Training) is a one week, on site intensive course for mid-career professionals who work to protect children from abuse, violence, exploitation and neglect, whether at an international organization, a local NGO, or a government agency. The training is designed to create a stimulating learning opportunity for experienced professionals involved with child protection issues and to help participants gain a deep understanding of child protection issues and of the leadership and negotiation skills relevant to building and sustaining effective child protection systems.

 

Please register on Zoom using the following link: https://harvard.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJApcuirqzMuHNx0diLI8yKxIQ0l-Wh....

 

Host Organization(s)

FXB Center for Health & Human Rights at Harvard University

Oct
13
Fri
Lecture/Panel

Future of Cities: Extreme Heat

4:00PM to 5:30PM
Askwith Hall (Longfellow), Graduate School of Education

 

PLEASE REGISTER TO ATTEND THIS EVENT HERE

 

Extreme weather patterns are increasing; how should individuals and institutions decide what to do next? Future of Cities: Extreme Heat, the third installation of OVPIA’s Future of Cities series, will showcase a panel discussing concerns around environmental justice and public health as global average temperatures rise. Cosponsored by the Office of the Vice Provost for International Affairs, the Salata Institute for Climate and Sustainability at Harvard University, and the Bloomberg Center for Cities at Harvard University, this discussion will convene experts in urban planning and design, building design and materials, environmental science, public health, and medicine to share their ideas on tangible next steps for lessening the impact of extreme heat.

The event will be held at 4pm on Friday, October 13, 2023 at Askwith Hall at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and will be open to the Harvard community. It will feature an introduction by University Provost Alan Garber and remarks from Vice Provost for International Affairs Mark Elliott and Vice Provost for Climate and Sustainability James Stock. Moderator John Macomber of Harvard Business School will then lead a panel discussion with Harvard faculty members and practitioners, including:

  • Satchit Balsari, Assistant Professor in Emergency Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
  • Zoe Davis, Climate Resilience Project Manager, City of Boston
  • Francesca Dominici, Clarence James Gamble Professor of Biostatistics, Population and Data Science at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Co-Director of the Harvard Data Science Initiative
  • Jane Gilbert, Chief Heat Officer, Miami-Dade County, Florida
  • Spencer Glendon, Founder, Probable Futures

 

Oct
13
Fri
Lecture/Panel

Is Activism Futile?: The Case of Israel

4:00PM to 6:00PM
In-person: Harvard Faculty Club, Library, 20 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA 02138 No registration required. https://cmes.fas.harvard.edu/event/activism-futile-case-israel

ANNUAL HILDA B SILVERMAN MEMORIAL LECTURE ON ISRAEL-PALESTINE

 

Host Organization(s)

The Middle East Forum at Harvard's Center for Middle Eastern Studies
Religion, Conflict and Peace Initiative, Harvard Divinity School

Oct
13
Fri
Lecture/Panel, Social, Reception

'Agora': Film Screening and Discussion. Exploring Gender Perspective, Cinematic Value, and Historical Insights

5:00PM to 8:00PM
The event will be hybrid (in person and virtual). The link will be accessible on the RCCHU website.

Join us on October 13th at 5:00 PM for an engaging event. We will begin the evening with a screening of the film 'Agora'. Directed by the Chilean-Spanish Alejandro Amenábar, 'Agora' is a visually stunning historical drama set in ancient Alexandria, Egypt. The film explores the life of the philosopher and mathematician Hypatia of Alexandria, who grapples with societal and scientific challenges of her time. Following the screening, we will have a discussion that spans various aspects of the film, including:

1. Gender Perspective: We will examine the portrayal of women in academia and society during the historical period depicted in the film. How does Hypatia's character challenge gender norms, and what can we learn from her experiences?

2. Cinematic Value: Let's explore the visual and storytelling techniques used by Alejandro Amenábar. How does the cinematography, music, and overall direction contribute to the film's impact?

3. Historical Insights: "Agora" offers a glimpse into the religious and philosophical conflicts of ancient Alexandria. What historical events and figures are depicted in the movie, and how accurately are they portrayed?

4. Literary Themes: Are there any literary or philosophical themes in the film that resonate with us today? How does the movie's narrative connect with broader philosophical discussions?

The event will conclude after the film's duration, followed by approximately 30 to 45 minutes of discussion, allowing participants to share their thoughts and insights. Don't miss this opportunity to immerse yourself in the world of ‘Agora’ and engage in a thought-provoking conversation about its many facets in the Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard University. After the discussion, we will offer an informal reception with beverages and light food in our garden terrace.

Event Presenters

-Presenter: Daniel Sanchez Mata, Director, Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard University
-Main speakers: Uniai Iriarte and Pablo Sanahuja, Postdoctoral Researchers at Harvard University, fellows of the Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard University

Host Organization(s)

Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard University (RCCHU)